15 Most Popular Home Styles Across the U.S.

From extravagant to quaint, homes across the U.S. hold their own unique beauty and characteristics just like the people who inhabit them. Check out the 15 most popular home styles in the United States right now. The post 15 Most Popular Home Styles Across the U.S. appeared first on Redfin | Real Estate Tips for Home Buying, Selling & More.

15 Most Popular Home Styles Across the U.S.

No matter where you live, you’ll likely encounter a wide variety of architectural home styles just by driving through your neighborhood. From extravagant to quaint, homes across the U.S. hold their own unique beauty and characteristics just like the people who inhabit them.

So, what are the most popular home styles in the U.S.? From to , you don’t have to be an architect to appreciate the range of stunning house styles available on the . So whether you’re in the market for a new home or just love browsing homes on your favorite , check out the 15 most popular home styles in the United States right now.

What Are the Most Popular Home Styles?

1. Ranch-style homes

Dating back to 1932, the ranch-style home grew in popularity during the 1950s and 1960s, and is still popular today. The iconic ranch architecture is known for its simple, single-story floor plan, low-to-the-ground look, often with an open layout and occasional basement. This style of house typically has a smaller yard, attached garage, and a low-pitched roof. The ranch-style home often features large windows and sliding glass doors, encouraging an indoor-outdoor living style. A ranch can also be called a ‘rambler,’ depending on which region in the country you live in and local terminology. 

Looking locally, ranch-style homes currently have the highest sale-to-list ratio in a handful of cities,  meaning this style of house is more likely to sell above the list price. These cities include , , , San Francisco, CA, and . Each of these cities favor the rambler, with a current sale-to-list ratio of over 100%.

2. Craftsman-style homes

Two-story red brick colored craftsman home with greenery

The beloved craftsman style home became increasingly popular in the 1900s by architect and furniture designer Gustav Stickley, and has remained popular throughout the 21st century. This staple for American Architecture adds charm to any neighborhood with its exterior features, including shingles, low-pitched roofs, and covered front porches. Craftsman homes also feature recognizable interior details such as thick trim, prominent ceiling beams, and built-in shelving and seating.

Craftsman homes are a desirable home style all across the U.S., but they are often sold above list price in , , , and .

4. Contemporary-style homes

A two story white contemporary-style home with black garage and trim

Contemporary architecture is often used interchangeably when describing modern style architecture. A wide range of recently built homes are built with Contemporary-style architecture. These homes have inventive designs and simple forms without elaborate ornamentation or detail. They usually have geometric lines, large windows and doors to bring in light, and open floor plans. They often incorporate sustainable and eco-friendly building materials, textures, and components, exposed roof beams, and flat or low-pitched roofs. 

Contemporary-style homes see the highest sale-to-list ratio in , , , , , Chicago, IL, and .

5. Modern-style homes

Single-story modern home with pool is one of the most popular home styles

Emerging in the 1920s to embrace minimalism and reject the more ornate home styles, modern house styles typically include progressive elements such as asymmetrical exteriors, flat roofs, and integrated outdoor spaces. Many modern interiors also feature minimal molding and trim, neutral color palettes, and metal accents.

You’ll find the highest sale-to-list ratio in .

6. Cape Cod-style homes

Single-story white cape-cod home with large lawn and front porch

With roots dating back to 1675, the quaint and charming Cape Cod-style homes are reminiscent of the classic American cottage style. This type of home design migrated from England to the United States, maintaining its symmetrical design and central chimney. Cape Cod-style homes feature a steep roof to keep snow from accumulating, dormer windows for added light, wood siding and shutters to keep the heat in, and hardwood floors for comfort and practicality. 

This style of house is prevalent in the northeastern part of the United States, commonly found in the New England region.

7. Colonial-style homes

Two story, brick colonial style homes with dark blue shutters

Dating back to 1876, East Coast architecture has maintained its allure in many parts of the United States. These classic homes are known for their old-world charm, decorative doorways, and symmetrical window placement. Many colonial-style homes will have two or three stories, fireplaces, and brick or wood exteriors.

Colonial-style homes are similar to the Cape Cod-style home because of their symmetry and side-gabled roofs, but Cape Cod-style homes are typically one story rather than two or three. Colonial-style homes can be found in the northeastern part of the United States.

8. Tudor-style homes

Neutral colored tudor style home with path to the front door

Originating in the 15th century during the reign of the House of Tudor, this style of house is fairly easy to identify with its unique features. Tudor-style homes typically have a combination of brick, stone, or stucco exterior and decorative half-timbering on the second story to create the well-known striped exterior. They also feature a steeply-pitched roof, cross gables, and tall, narrow windows. Today, Tudor-style homes are prominent in the Northeast and Midwest regions of the United States.

9. Cottage-style homes

two story cottage style home painted blue with an arched doorway

Inspired by the medieval styles of the English countryside, American architects designed the cozy cottage-style houses during the 1920s and 30s. This style of house typically has a steep, thatched roof, arched doorways, shuttered windows, and a warm storybook character bringing to life old-world charm.

10. Mediterranean-style homes

Mediterranean style home is mot popular in California and Florida

Mediterranean-style homes are suitable for warmer climates, which is why this style of house became prevalent in Southern California during the 1920s and 1930s. Influenced by the architecture of countries in the Mediterranean region, they often have low-pitched red tile roofs, vaulted ceilings, arched doors and windows, and a stucco or adobe exterior. The floor plan is typically U-shaped, creating a central courtyard for a garden or fountain. Today, this style of house remains popular in California and Florida.

11. Farmhouse-style homes

Two story white farmhouse-style home with a large lawn and black trim

The farmhouse was designed back in the early 1700s, built as housing for farmers and all about practicality. Modern farmhouses still exhibit many of the same features that the original design included, like large, wraparound front porches, clapboard siding, large fireplaces, wood floors, eat-in kitchens, and oversized kitchen sinks. 

12. Mid-Century modern-style homes

Neutral colored mid century modern home with triangle-shaped entry and wood fence

Mid-century modern style is part of the modernism movement and dates back to post-World War II, and remained popular throughout the 1970s. A mid-century modern design is characterized by minimalism, clean lines, and floor-to-ceiling windows. You’ll often see open layouts, and a mix of natural and manufactured materials for the interior elements like wood, stone, steel, and plastic.

Mid-century modern style homes are most popular in , , , and , with a sale-to-list ratio as high as 131.5% in Oakland.

13. Victorian-style homes

Two-story, pink victorian style home with white trim and round tower

Victorian-style homes were first seen during the Victorian Era from around 1860 to 1900. This house style is best described as a colorful dollhouse with romantic and distinctive features. Victorian-style homes have elaborate detailing in just about every part of the home, from the intricate wood trim, ornate staircases, stained glass, and decorative woodwork. They have steep gabled roofs, a front-facing gable, patterned shingles, bay windows, a round tower, and a front porch.

Victorian-style homes remain popular in and , with a sale-to-list ratio of 98.5% and 101.1%, respectively. 

15. Townhouse

four story brick townhouse

Originating in Europe and eventually migrating to the United States, townhomes are most commonly found across cities in the United States. With the convenience of spacious layouts, townhomes offer more amenities than the condo styles and are lower maintenance than most residential homes. They’re typically two or three-story homes, usually sharing one or two walls with adjacent properties, and a rooftop deck to enjoy sprawling views.

Home styles with the highest sale-to-list ratio in the largest 12 US metros:

Metro Home Style Sale-to-list ratio % active listings
Phoenix, AZ Ranch 102.3% 4.0%
Contemporary 101.8% 2.0%
Atlanta, GA Craftsman 100% 1.9%
Ranch 99.9% 2.0%
New Construction 101.9% 3.0%
Portland, OR Ranch 105.4% 2.2%
New Construction 103.5% 11.2%
Craftsman 101.5% 2.0%
Oakland, CA Mid Century Modern 131.5% 1.2%
Craftsman 128.4% 2.2%
Contemporary 112.5% 4.4%
Boston, MA Victorian 98.5% 1.0%
Craftsman 99.1% 1.0%
Penthouse Unit 103.3% 1.0%
Chicago, IL Raised Ranch/Ranch 100.2% 1.0%
Contemporary 99.1% 1.3%
Elevator Building 99.0% 1.0%
Denver, CO Contemporary 101.5% 7.9%
Mid Century Modern 105.1% 1.0%
Modern Architecture 103% 1.1%
San Francisco, CA Mid Century Modern 122.8% 1.0%
Contemporary 102.6% 6.5%
Ranch 104.7% 2.4%
Seattle, WA Mid Century Modern 110.9% 1.0%
Craftsman 108% 3.9%
New Construction 105.4% 28.0%
San Diego, CA Ranch 102.5% 2.3%
Contemporary 100.7% 3.3%
New Construction 101.2.% 1.2%

 

*Per on Redfin.com, as of May 2021 

Individual results may vary. This is not intended as a substitute for the services of a licensed real estate agent, or licensed and bonded home services professional or appraiser.

 

The post 15 Most Popular Home Styles Across the U.S. appeared first on Redfin | Real Estate Tips for Home Buying, Selling & More.

Source : Red Fin More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

REVEALED: What are the UK political parties’ key private rented sector policies?

Which way is the political wind blowing for landlords? Ahead of tomorrow’s local and regional elections, we ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - REVEALED: What are the UK political parties’ key private rented sector policies? | LandlordZONE.

REVEALED: What are the UK political parties’ key private rented sector policies?

Which way is the political wind blowing for landlords? Ahead of tomorrow’s local and regional elections, we take a look at the main political parties’ policies and their plans for the PRS.

Conservatives

The Conservatives have famously declared they want to turn Generation Rent into Generation Buy – evidenced by the government’s mortgage guarantee scheme announced  in the last Budget.

They are backing the introduction of the Renters’ Reform Bill and plan to remove section 21 ‘no fault’ evictions. In London, Conservative candidate Shaun Bailey has announced he wants, “more homeowners and fewer private landlords”. He wants to build 100,000 shared ownership homes available for £100,000, requiring only a £5,000 deposit.

Greens

The Greens believe assured shorthold tenancies should be phased out and replaced with a new stable rental tenancy. They have also called for the abolition of section 21 and rent controls to achieve a living rent.

To tackle rogue and slum landlords, the Green Party would simplify and toughen up the Housing Health and Safety Rating System, ensure local authorities dedicate adequate resources to proactively enforce it and has backed a national landlord licensing scheme.

Lib Dems

The Liberal Democrats have promised to scrap business rates altogether and replace them with a levy on landlords. It would also allow local authorities to increase council tax up to 500% where properties are being bought as second homes.

The party plans to introduce a new ‘rent to own’ model for social housing where rent payments give tenants an increasing stake in the property, so that they own it outright after 30 years. It’s also in favour of scrapping Section 21 and mandatory landlord licensing.

Plaid Cymru:

Plaid Cymru proposes a Fair Rents Bill, which would include measures such as ending ‘no-fault’ repossessions and providing tenancies of indefinite duration. It also wants to make tenancies more transferable between generations and to give councils the power to set a Living Rent rule to cap rent in rental pressure zones at a maximum of one third of local average income.

It would strengthen the powers to deal with poor landlords who don’t meet housing standards or social responsibilities, making them subject to annual vetting and being struck off if they fail to comply.

Labour

In London, Sadiq Khan has pledged to build 10,000 more council homes, as well as to explore a possible new fund to help local authorities buy back homes sold under the Right to Buy. He has also called for. In Manchester, Andy Burnham announced a £1.5m ‘good landlords scheme’ aimed at driving up standards in the private rented sector, and a long-term homelessness prevention strategy.

Labour wants to scrap Right to Rent, to introduce nationwide landlord licensing and ban discrimination against housing benefit tenants. It has pushed for the abolition of Section 21. It would also give councils new powers to regulate short-term lets through companies such as Airbnb.

SNP

The SNP has promised to deliver 100,000 affordable homes over the next decade, tackle high rents and increase stability for those in the private rented sector and to give local authorities the tools they need to improve access to housing in their local areas.

to improve accessibility, affordability and standards across the whole rented sector, publishing a new Rented Sector Strategy, informed by tenants, and would bring forward a new Housing Bill to strengthen tenants’ rights and improve the housing rights of people experiencing domestic abuse. A new Housing Standard would cover all new and existing homes.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - REVEALED: What are the UK political parties’ key private rented sector policies? | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.