20 Essential Photography Tips For Beginner Photographers

Starting out in photography can be really confusing. There is so much stuff to learn, so many things to do, and so many resources to read, not to mention the insane amount of people screaming opinions at you all the time. It’s hard to fight through all the noise. To make matters worse, there are […]

20 Essential Photography Tips For Beginner Photographers

Starting out in photography can be really confusing. There is so much stuff to learn, so many things to do, and so many resources to read, not to mention the insane amount of people screaming opinions at you all the time. It’s hard to fight through all the noise.

To make matters worse, there are so many resources out there that — while they may have great intentions — can often guide you down the wrong path, lead you to dead ends, or influence your mindset in a particular way. For example, if you put too much emphasis on gear or settings or focus on tips that are very domain-specific to a particular category of photography and not pertinent to you, you may not learn anything valuable to creating good photos.

In the video above, I aim to solve that. This video is the answer to all of the common questions I get from people who are in their first few years of photography. It’s not necessarily for people who are absolutely green and will be more useful to someone who has a firmer grasp on photography, but even if you are in their first few weeks with a camera, you can definitely grow into these tips.

These tips lay the foundation for solid photography skills and will help you set your basics up correctly. I’ll give you just enough detail to tell you about the point, but if you want to go deeper into the subject then, you know what to Google next!

Here are the first 10 points I mention in the video above:

  1. Photography is 70 percent about what is in the photo, 20 percent how you take the photo, and 10 percent how you edit it.
  2. The real secret to getting better at photography is vision.
  3. Understand what “good” looks like as fast as you can.
  4. Look to other forms of visual art for inspiration.
  5. Style isn’t something you should really worry about at the beginning.
  6. Understand the basics of the exposure triangle.
  7. Photography “rules” are a bad way to think about them.
  8. Take a lot of photos, make a lot of mistakes, and learn from all of them.
  9. Create a habit to work on skills daily.
  10. Get a firm grasp on the importance of light.

If those points look interesting to you, then check the video above for the explanations of each point, as well as the next 10 points that I think are important to understand.


About the author: Pat Kay is an award-winning travel photographer and multi-disciplinary content creator based in Sydney, Australia. With a passion for travel and adventure, Kay specializes in exploring the contrast between nature and urban, through landscape, cityscape, aerial, lifestyle, and street photography. He has worked with many of the world’s top brands such as Sony, Adobe, Microsoft, Samsung, Nike, Adidas, Ford, Toyota, Lexus, DJI, Razer, Instagram, and more. For more from Kay, follow him on Instagram and subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

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Instagram Tests ‘Suggested Posts’ That Can Appear Ahead of Friends

Instagram is reportedly testing a feature with a “small number” of users where its “suggested posts” feature will expand beyond just when you’ve reached the end of your feed and will be mixed throughout a browsing experience, possibly coming ahead of posts from those users follow. In a confirmation to The Verge, Instagram says that […]

Instagram Tests ‘Suggested Posts’ That Can Appear Ahead of Friends

Instagram is reportedly testing a feature with a “small number” of users where its “suggested posts” feature will expand beyond just when you’ve reached the end of your feed and will be mixed throughout a browsing experience, possibly coming ahead of posts from those users follow.

In a confirmation to , Instagram says that reception to the “suggested posts” feature was so positive that the company decided to try and mix those suggestions in with the average viewing experience, sometimes ahead of photos and videos from people a user explicitly follows.

Additionally, Instagram is testing new controls that will allow users to add a specific topic of interest for suggested posts as well as the ability to “snooze” the recommendations for 30 days or hide them from a feed entirely. “Suggested posts” is a feature that Instagram added last year, but prior to this small test was only ever seen after a user saw everything from all people they followed that was shared.

This shift would make Instagram theoretically function similarly to how YouTube manages its “home” page, which highlights content that is a mix of videos made by those a user is subscribed to as well as videos that YouTube’s algorithm thinks are of interest. YouTube leans so heavily on this analytics-forward approach that subscriptions have fallen in importance over the years.

If Instagram were to adopt placing suggested posts for all users, it may have a dramatic impact on how the social network functions. Instagram has a vested interest in keeping users on the platform for as long as possible, and keep them coming back. As such, the social network should not necessarily need to put as much value on showing a user content from people they follow as opposed to delivering photos and videos that keep them engaged. As YouTube has shown, just because a person subscribes to a Channel doesn’t mean that the user necessarily wants to see all content that Channel produces.

That’s the theory, anyway, and it might have ramifications in the long term for content creators who rely on Instagram to reach an audience, especially if suggested posts become more popular and show higher engagement than that of specifically followed accounts.

Algorithm-focused approaches have generally superseded ones that focus on giving users complete control over what they see. Facebook and Instagram both ditched a timeline-based approach years ago, and Twitter defaults users to the “Home” view instead of “Latest Tweets” which uses an algorithm to determine the most interesting content. At least in Twitter’s case, switching back to Latest Tweets is an option.

Instagram did not specify how many people its “suggested posts” test would affect nor how long it intended to test the feature.

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