2021 Aprilia Tuono V4/Factory

The Aprilia Tuono V4 and its Factory version bring 175 hp to the tour or the track and feature electronics, design, and engine updates for 2021.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4/Factory

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Tarmac Grey). (Aprilia/)

Ups

  • Legendary V-4 power with refined throttle response and shifting
  • Confidence-boosting handling
  • Extensive list of top-tier electronic rider aids
  • Stunning sound

Downs

  • Claimed peak power is less than competitors, but do you really need more?

Verdict

Think Italian superbike technical know-how in a stripped-down naked package built for street riding and serious racetrack potential. Welcome the Aprilia Tuono V4.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory.
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory. (Milagro/)

Overview

The Aprilia Tuono V4 and Tuono V4 Factory are top-tier Italian hypernakes. Components are largely derived from the RSV4 but it targets the sport-touring segment with a more upright riding position. With a 1,077cc 65-degree V-4 engine, aluminum chassis, Brembo brakes, and full suite of electronics these two have sat near or at the top of the totem pole for years. The Factory edition is track focused with electronic semi-active suspension and aluminum wheels.

Updates for 2021

Updates for Aprilia’s Tuono V4 include a revamped aerodynamic-focused design, new swingarm, narrower fuel tank with same tank capacity, revamped electronics with new adjustable engine-brake control, revised Magneti Marelli ECU, new 5-inch color TFT instrument cluster, and new handlebar controls. The engine complies with Euro 5 emissions thanks to the new exhaust and sees lighter valve spring bucket tappets. New color schemes round out the list.

The Tuono V4 Factory has a longer saddle, new fuel tank, and electronic semi-active suspension.

Pricing and Variants

The base Tuono V4 is priced at $15,999 and comes in two color schemes. The track-focused Factory edition ($19,499) comes in one color scheme. The base differs from its stablemate with a higher handlebar, larger windscreen, roomier passenger seat, and can fit accessory panniers. The latter also has a longer final drive ratio, forged aluminum wheels, Pirelli Diablo Rosso Supercorsa tires (wider 200/55 rear) and Öhlins electronic suspension, plus its mirrors, passenger pegs, and license plate bracket can be easily removed for trackdays.

Competition

If the Tuono were to go head to head with other standard motorcycles it would be staring down the BMW S 1000 R, Ducati Streetfighter V4, KTM 1290 Super Duke R, Yamaha MT-10, and Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS.

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

At the heart of the Tuono V4 lies a 1,077cc V-4 engine which Aprilia claims to produce 175 hp at 11,350 rpm and 121 Nm at 9,000 rpm. It meets Euro 5 emissions standards, but unlike the RSV4, does not see an increase in displacement.

Smooth and seamless shifting through the six-speed gearbox is done with an up/down quickshifter. “The fueling and throttle response, like the clutchless gear changes, are immaculate,” writes our test rider Adam Child. Because the engine’s fueling and quickshifting actions are so great, rider confidence is boosted, which in turn allows the rider to push the bike hard right out of the gate.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory.
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory. (Milagro/)

Handling

On board, Child reflected that the Tuono’s handling is controlled and is less physically demanding than some of the competition. Integrated winglets are designed to increase downforce and stability at speed. The aluminum frame strengthens torsional rigidity while Aprilia claims the new swingarm reinforces transverse rigidity by 48 percent in the wheel pin area.

The standard Tuono uses Sachs suspension versus the semi-active Öhlins setup in the Factory version we tested. Child wrote that the Factory’s suspension remained untouched throughout his day of testing because they were perfect right out of the box.

Brakes

Brembo M50 calipers with sintered pads and dual 330mm (front) and 220mm (rear) remain unchanged for this year. What does change is the increased vigilance of the ABS system, which makes quicker calculations thanks to the revised ECU.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Glacier White).
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 (Glacier White). (Aprilia/)

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Fuel consumption is claimed to be 32.7 mpg.

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

Because of the upright, road-focused nature of the Tuono versus the RSV4, ergonomics are more neutral. The redesigned 4.7-gallon fuel tank is narrower while maintaining the same capacity and a small top fairing offers some wind protection. On the Factory version, the seat is longer to accommodate taller riders. Seat height is listed at 33.0 inches.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory.
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory. (Milagro/)

Electronics

There’s no arguing that Aprilia has an expansive and sophisticated electronics suite. The Aprilia Performance Ride Control (APRC) now has adjustable engine-brake control and also includes five-level wheelie control, six ride modes, engine maps, launch control, up/down quickshifter, pit limiter, cruise control, cornering ABS, and on-the-fly-adjustable traction control. The new 5-inch color TFT dash and switch gear ease navigation through it all.

The Tuono has unmistakable LED lighting with cornering lighting, a twilight sensor that activates low beams automatically, and self-cancelling indicators that flash in case of emergency braking.

The Factory’s Öhlins electronic suspension system has two operating modes (semi-active and manual) with three maps each, which can be selected with buttons on the handlebar. There is also an Öhlins steering damper which is managed by the Smart EC 2.0 system.

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Aprilia has a 2-year, unlimited-mileage warranty.

Quality

Top-of-the-line electronics, excellent fueling, confidence-boosting handling, and a V-4 engine that produces a stunning sound. Saying the Aprilia Tuono V4 is impressive could be somewhat of an understatement.

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory.
2021 Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory. (Aprilia/)

2021 Aprilia Tuono V4/Factory Claimed Specifications

MSRP: $15,999/$19,499
Engine: 1,077cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V-4; 4-valve/cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 x 52.3mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Fuel Delivery: Fuel injection w/ Marelli 48mm throttle bodies, ride-by-wire
Clutch: Wet, multiplate slipper/assist
Engine Management/Ignition: Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system
Frame: Aluminum dual beam
Front Suspension: 43mm Sachs USD fork/Öhlins NIX fork, fully adjustable; 4.6 in. travel/4.7 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Sachs/Öhlins shock, fully adjustable; 5.1 in. travel
Front Brake: Radial Brembo M50 4-piston caliper, dual 330mm discs w/ Cornering ABS
Rear Brake: 2-piston floating caliper, 220mm disc w/ Cornering ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast alloy; 17 x 3.5 in. / 17 x 6.0 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso III; 120/70-17, 190/55-17 / Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa; 120/70-17, 200/55-17
Rake/Trail: 24.7°/3.9 in.
Wheelbase: 57.2 in.
Ground Clearance: N/A
Seat Height: 33.0 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gal.
Wet Weight: 461 lb.
Contact: aprilia.com
Source : Motorcyclist More   

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2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R MC Commute Review

Suzuki pairs performance, versatility, and value with its up-spec GSX-R1000R superbike as described in this review.

2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R MC Commute Review

Suzuki pairs value, versatility, and performance in the liter-sized superbike segment with its 2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R ($17,749). This up-spec GSX-R benefits from upgraded suspenders, a slick-shifting electronic quickshifter, and a couple of other worthwhile upgrades that make it more competent on and off track.


Suzuki offers plenty of bang for the buck with its up-spec GSX-R1000R superbike ($17,749). (Joseph Agustin/)

When it comes to outright street-riding comfort, few sportbikes ride as well as Suzuki GSX-Rs. And that trend continues with its 1000R. It’s a very slim motorcycle—especially for an inline-four. The seat is well supported and the reach to the clip-on style controls isn’t too aggressive. We like the position of the rider’s footpegs, which are neither too high, nor too low. It would be nice if this GSX-R had foot control adjustment like its GSX-R600 and 750 duo. One change we bemoan is its 0.4-gallon-smaller 4.2-gallon fuel tank.

We love the livery and color combination of the 2021 GSX-R1000R. It looks clean, yet makes a racy statement when parked.
We love the livery and color combination of the 2021 GSX-R1000R. It looks clean, yet makes a racy statement when parked. (Joseph Agustin/)

Tap the starter button and the GSX-R fires to life with a unique growl. Despite employing a conventional inline-four firing order, the engine offers signature character unlike others in its class. We especially appreciate its meaty intake roar and whiny, high-tech-sounding exhaust note. Suzuki offers an ingenious variable valve timing solution that helps give its four-cylinder the best of both worlds.

The cockpit of the GSX-R1000R is one of the more comfortable in the liter-and-above sportbike segment.
The cockpit of the GSX-R1000R is one of the more comfortable in the liter-and-above sportbike segment. (Joseph Agustin/)

Peppy bottom-end bark morphs into thick car-passing midrange oomph. Top-end power is strong too, but not quite as powerful as competitors in its class. Still, it’s got enough giddyap to get the blood pumping. We’d estimate a horsepower figure in the mid-160s at the 190-series Bridgestone Battlax RS11 tire. Fuel-mileage-wise, we measured an average of 36 mpg.

Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R impresses with its high-level of agility. It dances well for a 445-pound motorcycle.
Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R impresses with its high-level of agility. It dances well for a 445-pound motorcycle. (Joseph Agustin/)

An early leader in sportbike electronics (the ’97 GSX-R750 was the first Japanese sportbike with fuel injection), this GSX-R retains its S-DMS adjustable power mode setup. Ride-by-wire throttle integration affords throttle control adjustment that’s neatly integrated into each power mode. Full-power mode A was our favorite.

Showa’s up-spec Balance Free fork is worth the upcharge. It offers more responsive action and simple adjustment at the bottom of each fork leg.
Showa’s up-spec Balance Free fork is worth the upcharge. It offers more responsive action and simple adjustment at the bottom of each fork leg. (Joseph Agustin/)

Ten-way-adjustable IMU-powered traction control is also present, however its programming feels more rudimentary compared to other contemporary setups from Japan and Europe. The 1000R also adds launch control to its arsenal, but we didn’t test it this time. Wheelie and engine-brake control are absent from its electronics suite, as is cruise control. Heated grips would be a nice upgrade too considering how roadworthy this Gixxer is.

Rear suspension duties are handled by Showa’s Balance Free Rear Cushion Lite shock. It’s a weird name, but it performs well both on the street and track.
Rear suspension duties are handled by Showa’s Balance Free Rear Cushion Lite shock. It’s a weird name, but it performs well both on the street and track. (Joseph Agustin/)

The slick-shifting up-and-down electronic quickshifter, on the other hand, performs splendidly allowing you to row through the six-speed gearbox instantly.

In terms of agility, the 445-pound GSX-R1000R impresses with its maneuverability. It steers more sharply than its predecessor while still offering a high degree of stability. Equally impressive is the lofty level of rear grip that the chassis affords. The upgraded Balance Free suspension components follow the road more accurately than the older hardware on the basic GSX-R. Still, the front end isn’t as magical feeling as Team Green’s offering (employs similar front suspension).

The GSX-R1000R benefits from a bright LED headlamp. However we wish it offered a cornering light function for fast paced night rides.
The GSX-R1000R benefits from a bright LED headlamp. However we wish it offered a cornering light function for fast paced night rides. (Joseph Agustin/)

The R model’s stainless steel front brake lines are a much-needed improvement and help mitigate brake fade—a feature that has plagued Suzuki GSX-Rs. We also appreciate the rear brake’s strong, responsive feel. Full-time ABS with cornering functionality mitigates instability during braking.

The 2021 GSX-R1000R commands an additional $1,950 versus the base GSX-R1000. For that upcharge you get higher specification suspension, an bi-directional quickshifter, launch control, steel-braided front brake lines, and cornering ABS.
The 2021 GSX-R1000R commands an additional $1,950 versus the base GSX-R1000. For that upcharge you get higher specification suspension, an bi-directional quickshifter, launch control, steel-braided front brake lines, and cornering ABS. (Joseph Agustin/)

A bright LED headlamp throws a deep spread of light during night rides. The R’s LED positioning lights are also a nice touch. However, because it employs an IMU, we wish Suzuki added a cornering light function to boost visibility during fast-paced night rides through curvy stretches of road. Keeping tabs on vehicle settings is a 5.5-inch backlit LCD. Despite being only one color, the display is functional and easy to read day and night. However, the display could be larger.

The GSX-R1000R also gets LED positioning lights above both ram air intakes.
The GSX-R1000R also gets LED positioning lights above both ram air intakes. (Joseph Agustin/)

Despite not employing a truly modern electronics package, the GSX-R1000R continues to be one of our favorites due to its versatility and ease of use. We’re big fans of its punchy powertrain and capable chassis that’s as adept on track as it is off of it. Considering its competitive price tag and fine craftsmanship, there’s no doubt Suzuki drives a hard bargain with its GSX-R1000R.

The 2021 GSX-R1000R rolls on Bridgestone’s versatile Battlax RS11 tires. The Japanese-made rubber offers loads of grip and quick warm-up time.
The 2021 GSX-R1000R rolls on Bridgestone’s versatile Battlax RS11 tires. The Japanese-made rubber offers loads of grip and quick warm-up time. (Joseph Agustin/)

Gear Box:

Helmet: Shoei RF-SR

Jacket: REV’IT! Hudson

Pant: REV’IT! Austin

Gloves: Racer Mickey Gloves

Boots: TCX X-Cube EVO Air

Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R is easily one of the most comfortable sportbikes for dedicated street riding.
Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R is easily one of the most comfortable sportbikes for dedicated street riding. (Joseph Agustin/)

2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R Technical Specifications and Price

PRICE $17,749
ENGINE 999cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 16-valve
BORE x STROKE 76.0 x 55.1mm
COMPRESSION RATIO 13.2:1
FUEL DELIVERY Fuel injection w/ ride-by-wire throttle bodies
CLUTCH Wet, multiplate slipper; cable actuation
TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain
FRAME Twin spar
FRONT SUSPENSION Showa Balance Free 43mm inverted fork, fully adjustable; 4.7 in. travel
REAR SUSPENSION Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion Light shock, fully adjustable; 5.1 in. travel
FRONT BRAKES Brembo 4-piston calipers, 320mm discs w/ ABS
REAR BRAKE Nissin 1-piston caliper, 220mm disc w/ ABS
WHEELS, FRONT/REAR Cast aluminum; 17 x 3.5 in. / 17 x 6.0 in.
TIRES, FRONT/REAR Bridgestone Battlax RS11; 120/70-17 / 190/55-17
RAKE/TRAIL 23.2°/3.7 in.
WHEELBASE 55.9 in.
GROUND CLEARANCE 5.1 in.
SEAT HEIGHT 32.5 in.
FUEL CAPACITY 4.2 gal.
CLAIMED WET WEIGHT 445 lb.
WARRANTY 1 year, unlimited mileage
AVAILABLE June 2021
Its LED tail light is bright and helps the Suzuki rider stand out after dark. One gripe: we wish the turn signals were LED, too.
Its LED tail light is bright and helps the Suzuki rider stand out after dark. One gripe: we wish the turn signals were LED, too. (Joseph Agustin/)
Source : Motorcyclist More   

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