2021 BMW X7 40i gets 48V mild-hybrid and lots of new changes

The new X7 is a smashing success for BMW in the United States. Highly criticized at first, the 7-seater SUV is now driving a lot … The article 2021 BMW X7 40i gets 48V mild-hybrid and lots of new changes appeared first on BMW BLOG

2021 BMW X7 40i gets 48V mild-hybrid and lots of new changes

The new X7 is a smashing success for BMW in the United States. Highly criticized at first, the 7-seater SUV is now driving a lot of new customers to the brand. So naturally, BMW aims to keep it refresh every year.

The 2021 BMW X7 ordering guide just became available and it contains a wide range of new features. Let’s start with the 48V mild-hybrid system which will be included in the BMW X7 xDrive40i model.

The mild hybrid technology is particularly useful, as it optimizes the powertrain functioning, provides a power boost when needed and supports the engine workload in various situations.

The 48V mild hybrid drive first became available in the pre-LCI 5 Series model in Fall 2019, specifically in the 520d 4-cylinder diesel unit. Eventually, towards late 2019, the 3 Series and several X models also benefitted from the new technology.

Now, starting with July and August 2020, BMW will extend the 48-volt solution to a further 37 models, bringing the total number of mild hybrid-equipped models within the range to no less than 51 different models.

More Standard Features, New Options

The 2021 BMW X7 will now also include a significant amount of standard features:

  • Remote Engine Start on the BMW X7 xDrive40i
  • Heated Front Seats, Armrests, and Steering Wheel
  • Lifetime Apple CarPlay
  • Lifetime Android Auto
  • Satellite Radio with SiriusXM

SECOND DRIVE: 2019 BMW X7 – The “Big Boy” Is Here To Stay

Optional Equipment Changes:

  • M Sport Brakes with Black Calipers (3M3) will now be available as an alternative to the M Sport Brakes with Blue Calipers (2NH).
  • Ventilated Seats (453) were released in MY20 as a single option due to capacity restraints on several upholstery variants. In MY21, this will no longer be offered as a single option.
  • Extended Shadowline (7M9) has been repriced at $300 to align with the cross platform pricing of the option.
  • Glass Controls (4A2) will no longer be available as a single option, but will remain a part of the Executive Package (ZPX).
  • Head-Up Display (610) and Harman Kardon surround sound (688) will no longer be offered as single options, but will remain a part of the Premium and Executive packages.
  • Ambient Air (4NM) will no longer be offered.
  • Offroad Package (ZOR) will no longer be offered.
  • Night Vision (6UK) will no longer be offered.
  • Rear Seat Entertainment (6FH) will no longer be offered.
  • Bowers and Wilkins (6F1) will no longer be offered on the X7 xDrive40i.
  • Leather Dashboard (4M5) will no longer be offered on the X7 xDrive40i.
  • Fineline Cross Black trim with Aluminum inserts (XET) and Black Metallic Ash trim (4KP) will no longer be offered.
  • Vermont Bronze (C1Z) will no longer be offered.
  • All Full Merino Leather Upholsteries (ZBxx) and Black Vernasca Leather with Brown Stitching (MAH9) will no longer be offered.

FIRST DRIVE: 2019 BMW X4 – A Refined and Improved Sports Activity Coupe

To turn the BMW X7 into an even more compelling product, BMW of North America is further enhancing its equipment:

  • SA322 – Comfort Access 2.0 has been enhanced to stop from unlocking and locking as the key holder walks around the rear of the vehicle.
  • SA4A2 – Glass Controls no longer include the radio volume knob in crystal when ordered.
  • SA655 – Satellite Radio has been enhanced with SiriusXM with 360L.
    Package Changes:
  • As 4HB was made standard, Cold Weather Package (ZCW) includes Heated Front and Rear Seats (4HA), and 5-Zone Climate Control (4NN).
  • As 1CR was made standard, Premium Package (ZPP) for the X7 xDrive40i includes Soft-close doors (323), rear window shades (417), Gesture Control (6U8), Head-Up Display (610), and Harman/Kardon (688).

The ordering bank will open up in July 2020.

 

The article 2021 BMW X7 40i gets 48V mild-hybrid and lots of new changes appeared first on BMW BLOG

Source : BMW Blog More   

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Self-charging hybrid vs. Plug-In Hybrid – What’s The difference

When it comes to buying a hybrid car, you’re faced with two choices: plug-in hybrids cars and self-charging hybrids. Of course, by now you are curious to know … The article Self-charging hybrid vs. Plug-In Hybrid – What’s The difference appeared first on BMW BLOG

Self-charging hybrid vs. Plug-In Hybrid – What’s The difference

When it comes to buying a hybrid car, you’re faced with two choices: . Of course, by now you are curious to know the differences between these two hybrid architectures.

Vehicles classified as self-charging hybrids are cars that combine a petrol (sometimes even a diesel) engine with a tiny electric motor and an even smaller electric battery.

Sometimes, people call these kind of vehicle “full hybrids”, but this term might disguise you, letting you think that these cars can travel by using a full-electric mode for a long time.

We won’t discuss mild-hybrid vehicles right now, because this type of vehicles is equipped just with a starter generator and not with a real electric motor. This electric starter-generator can help the main engine in start-stop situations and while you enable your cruise control at a constant speed.

But can’t do a lot more than that.

How are self-charging hybrids made? And how do they work?

Self-charging hybrid vehicles are cars that have one (sometimes more) small electric motors. These motors have the task to assist the main engine to increase overall performances and improve the car’s efficiency. The Japanese car manufacturer Toyota (and also Lexus) loves this type of architecture and sells a lot of these models around the world.

You can’t just plug your self-charging hybrid car into an electrical outlet and recharge it. To do so, the only thing you have to do is drive – or, to be more precise, to brake. The car will use the kinetic energy produced by the petrol engine or by braking to recharge the electric motor’s battery.

How to charge my electric car – The Ultimate Guide

This energy will be used by the motor to help the car gain speed faster, also to completely shut down the petrol engine when you are traveling at low speed or while you are driving in traffic.

By using a self-charging hybrid vehicle, you won’t only consume less fuel, but also emit less CO2 in the environment. If you live in the European Union where cities keep banning diesel and old petrol cars, a self-charging hybrid car might be a perfect solution for you.

Are self-charging hybrid cars convenient?

It depends. To answer this question, let’s start from the car’s cost and its efficiency. We’ll take as an example one of the most famous self-charging hybrid cars: the Toyota Yaris.

If you won’t take advantage of ecological incentives (which are pretty frequent, to be honest), the price difference between a full-petrol Yaris and a self-charging hybrid Yaris is €4,500 more or less.

If you use your car to travel around town or to go to work, Toyota declares a decrease on fuel consumption of about 30%, while at increasing speeds the difference between the two versions will gradually decrease (at highway speeds, the two versions’ efficiency is almost the same).

But the comparison is not over yet. A lot of countries guarantee a discount on annual taxes and car insurance too. Moreover, thanks to lower CO2 emissions, you will be able to enter some congestion charge zones for free.

You should consider buying a self-charging car also if you can’t be 100% sure to plug your car to an electrical outlet at the end of the day. If your plug-in hybrid car’s battery is not charged, the additional weight will make you lose a lot of efficiency, while self-charging cars’ battery will reload itself faster.

What is Fast Charging for electric cars?

Obviously, every country has its advantages and we can’t predict yours, so be sure to consider everything before calculating a hybrid car’s convenience.

By the way, if you travel a lot in town, this type of hybrid car will be a good choice 99.9% of the times.

Got it. And why should I consider something else?

You should consider another type of hybrid car (plug-in hybrid cars) if you are usual to travel a lot at high speeds (more than 110 km/h – 70 mph). Self-charging hybrid electrical motors are not powerful enough to help the main engine at those speeds and you will just “suffer” more because of the additional weight.

If you can recharge your hybrid car 100% of the times (at home and at work), probably a plug-in hybrid car is the best solution for you because it can do more than a couple of miles-kilometers in electric-only mode, making you consume less fuel.

Last but not least, self-charging hybrid cars are usually not powerful. If you want to have a little bit of fun on your car every now and then, just consider that almost every self-charging car don’t have more than 100 – 120 hp to offer, even if you consider both the engines combined.

Go get a plug-in hybrid car if you want more power than that.

[Source: EVGLOBE]

The article Self-charging hybrid vs. Plug-In Hybrid – What’s The difference appeared first on BMW BLOG

Source : BMW Blog More   

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