2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R MC Commute Review

Suzuki pairs performance, versatility, and value with its up-spec GSX-R1000R superbike as described in this review.

2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R MC Commute Review

Suzuki pairs value, versatility, and performance in the liter-sized superbike segment with its 2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R ($17,749). This up-spec GSX-R benefits from upgraded suspenders, a slick-shifting electronic quickshifter, and a couple of other worthwhile upgrades that make it more competent on and off track.


Suzuki offers plenty of bang for the buck with its up-spec GSX-R1000R superbike ($17,749). (Joseph Agustin/)

When it comes to outright street-riding comfort, few sportbikes ride as well as Suzuki GSX-Rs. And that trend continues with its 1000R. It’s a very slim motorcycle—especially for an inline-four. The seat is well supported and the reach to the clip-on style controls isn’t too aggressive. We like the position of the rider’s footpegs, which are neither too high, nor too low. It would be nice if this GSX-R had foot control adjustment like its GSX-R600 and 750 duo. One change we bemoan is its 0.4-gallon-smaller 4.2-gallon fuel tank.

We love the livery and color combination of the 2021 GSX-R1000R. It looks clean, yet makes a racy statement when parked.
We love the livery and color combination of the 2021 GSX-R1000R. It looks clean, yet makes a racy statement when parked. (Joseph Agustin/)

Tap the starter button and the GSX-R fires to life with a unique growl. Despite employing a conventional inline-four firing order, the engine offers signature character unlike others in its class. We especially appreciate its meaty intake roar and whiny, high-tech-sounding exhaust note. Suzuki offers an ingenious variable valve timing solution that helps give its four-cylinder the best of both worlds.

The cockpit of the GSX-R1000R is one of the more comfortable in the liter-and-above sportbike segment.
The cockpit of the GSX-R1000R is one of the more comfortable in the liter-and-above sportbike segment. (Joseph Agustin/)

Peppy bottom-end bark morphs into thick car-passing midrange oomph. Top-end power is strong too, but not quite as powerful as competitors in its class. Still, it’s got enough giddyap to get the blood pumping. We’d estimate a horsepower figure in the mid-160s at the 190-series Bridgestone Battlax RS11 tire. Fuel-mileage-wise, we measured an average of 36 mpg.

Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R impresses with its high-level of agility. It dances well for a 445-pound motorcycle.
Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R impresses with its high-level of agility. It dances well for a 445-pound motorcycle. (Joseph Agustin/)

An early leader in sportbike electronics (the ’97 GSX-R750 was the first Japanese sportbike with fuel injection), this GSX-R retains its S-DMS adjustable power mode setup. Ride-by-wire throttle integration affords throttle control adjustment that’s neatly integrated into each power mode. Full-power mode A was our favorite.

Showa’s up-spec Balance Free fork is worth the upcharge. It offers more responsive action and simple adjustment at the bottom of each fork leg.
Showa’s up-spec Balance Free fork is worth the upcharge. It offers more responsive action and simple adjustment at the bottom of each fork leg. (Joseph Agustin/)

Ten-way-adjustable IMU-powered traction control is also present, however its programming feels more rudimentary compared to other contemporary setups from Japan and Europe. The 1000R also adds launch control to its arsenal, but we didn’t test it this time. Wheelie and engine-brake control are absent from its electronics suite, as is cruise control. Heated grips would be a nice upgrade too considering how roadworthy this Gixxer is.

Rear suspension duties are handled by Showa’s Balance Free Rear Cushion Lite shock. It’s a weird name, but it performs well both on the street and track.
Rear suspension duties are handled by Showa’s Balance Free Rear Cushion Lite shock. It’s a weird name, but it performs well both on the street and track. (Joseph Agustin/)

The slick-shifting up-and-down electronic quickshifter, on the other hand, performs splendidly allowing you to row through the six-speed gearbox instantly.

In terms of agility, the 445-pound GSX-R1000R impresses with its maneuverability. It steers more sharply than its predecessor while still offering a high degree of stability. Equally impressive is the lofty level of rear grip that the chassis affords. The upgraded Balance Free suspension components follow the road more accurately than the older hardware on the basic GSX-R. Still, the front end isn’t as magical feeling as Team Green’s offering (employs similar front suspension).

The GSX-R1000R benefits from a bright LED headlamp. However we wish it offered a cornering light function for fast paced night rides.
The GSX-R1000R benefits from a bright LED headlamp. However we wish it offered a cornering light function for fast paced night rides. (Joseph Agustin/)

The R model’s stainless steel front brake lines are a much-needed improvement and help mitigate brake fade—a feature that has plagued Suzuki GSX-Rs. We also appreciate the rear brake’s strong, responsive feel. Full-time ABS with cornering functionality mitigates instability during braking.

The 2021 GSX-R1000R commands an additional $1,950 versus the base GSX-R1000. For that upcharge you get higher specification suspension, an bi-directional quickshifter, launch control, steel-braided front brake lines, and cornering ABS.
The 2021 GSX-R1000R commands an additional $1,950 versus the base GSX-R1000. For that upcharge you get higher specification suspension, an bi-directional quickshifter, launch control, steel-braided front brake lines, and cornering ABS. (Joseph Agustin/)

A bright LED headlamp throws a deep spread of light during night rides. The R’s LED positioning lights are also a nice touch. However, because it employs an IMU, we wish Suzuki added a cornering light function to boost visibility during fast-paced night rides through curvy stretches of road. Keeping tabs on vehicle settings is a 5.5-inch backlit LCD. Despite being only one color, the display is functional and easy to read day and night. However, the display could be larger.

The GSX-R1000R also gets LED positioning lights above both ram air intakes.
The GSX-R1000R also gets LED positioning lights above both ram air intakes. (Joseph Agustin/)

Despite not employing a truly modern electronics package, the GSX-R1000R continues to be one of our favorites due to its versatility and ease of use. We’re big fans of its punchy powertrain and capable chassis that’s as adept on track as it is off of it. Considering its competitive price tag and fine craftsmanship, there’s no doubt Suzuki drives a hard bargain with its GSX-R1000R.

The 2021 GSX-R1000R rolls on Bridgestone’s versatile Battlax RS11 tires. The Japanese-made rubber offers loads of grip and quick warm-up time.
The 2021 GSX-R1000R rolls on Bridgestone’s versatile Battlax RS11 tires. The Japanese-made rubber offers loads of grip and quick warm-up time. (Joseph Agustin/)

Gear Box:

Helmet: Shoei RF-SR

Jacket: REV’IT! Hudson

Pant: REV’IT! Austin

Gloves: Racer Mickey Gloves

Boots: TCX X-Cube EVO Air

Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R is easily one of the most comfortable sportbikes for dedicated street riding.
Suzuki’s GSX-R1000R is easily one of the most comfortable sportbikes for dedicated street riding. (Joseph Agustin/)

2021 Suzuki GSX-R1000R Technical Specifications and Price

PRICE $17,749
ENGINE 999cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 16-valve
BORE x STROKE 76.0 x 55.1mm
COMPRESSION RATIO 13.2:1
FUEL DELIVERY Fuel injection w/ ride-by-wire throttle bodies
CLUTCH Wet, multiplate slipper; cable actuation
TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain
FRAME Twin spar
FRONT SUSPENSION Showa Balance Free 43mm inverted fork, fully adjustable; 4.7 in. travel
REAR SUSPENSION Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion Light shock, fully adjustable; 5.1 in. travel
FRONT BRAKES Brembo 4-piston calipers, 320mm discs w/ ABS
REAR BRAKE Nissin 1-piston caliper, 220mm disc w/ ABS
WHEELS, FRONT/REAR Cast aluminum; 17 x 3.5 in. / 17 x 6.0 in.
TIRES, FRONT/REAR Bridgestone Battlax RS11; 120/70-17 / 190/55-17
RAKE/TRAIL 23.2°/3.7 in.
WHEELBASE 55.9 in.
GROUND CLEARANCE 5.1 in.
SEAT HEIGHT 32.5 in.
FUEL CAPACITY 4.2 gal.
CLAIMED WET WEIGHT 445 lb.
WARRANTY 1 year, unlimited mileage
AVAILABLE June 2021
Its LED tail light is bright and helps the Suzuki rider stand out after dark. One gripe: we wish the turn signals were LED, too.
Its LED tail light is bright and helps the Suzuki rider stand out after dark. One gripe: we wish the turn signals were LED, too. (Joseph Agustin/)
Source : Motorcyclist More   

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2021 Moto Guzzi V7

The 2021 Moto Guzzi V7 maintains its traditional and unique design, but a new engine, chassis, electronics, etc. improves the package.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Azzurro Ghiaccio). (Moto Guzzi/)

Ups

  • Claimed 25 percent increase in power compared to previous generation via a larger 853cc engine
  • Styling that is uniquely Moto Guzzi
  • Comfortable upright body position
  • Good feel at the brakes for precise stopping application

Downs

  • Very vague clutch feel
  • Abrupt fueling
  • Vibration through the handlebars at 3,000 rpm that doesn’t subside until 5,000 rpm

Verdict

The transverse V-twin and the overall styling of the Moto Guzzi V7 is iconic. Now that V-twin sees a boost in power that makes it even more capable.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ruvido).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ruvido). (Moto Guzzi/)

Overview

One hundred years is quite a milestone, and Moto Guzzi is celebrating with a limited-edition version of its V7 Stone as well as an expansive list of changes, which includes a boosted transverse V-twin. Its engine’s transverse configuration is iconic to Moto Guzzi and the bike’s lines are distinct and good looking. It is a friendly V-twin that fits in the growing retro standard category.

Updates for 2021

Many updates are seen on the latest V7. First thing you may notice is Moto Guzzi dropped the Roman numerals at the end of the name, so it is now known simply as the V7 Stone or V7 Special. One of the major mechanical changes is the switch to the larger 853cc engine and revamped gearbox. This engine has many other internal changes which include: a more rigid crankcase, new lubrication system with a semi dry sump, and shorter cylinders.

Chassis changes include a new sheet of reinforced steel beneath the headstock, fitment of a larger shaft final drive, longer-travel Kayaba shocks with modified connections, a wider rear tire (150/70), new Dunlop Arrowmax Streetsmart tires, and new aluminum rims (Stone).

The electronics suite sees some changes to a full LED lighting system, debuted on the Stone, as well as a new instrument cluster.

Stylistic and comfort changes include the new side panels and shorter rear mudguard, newly designed exhaust, new split-level seat, brand-new rider footpeg vibration-damping support.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ravido).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ravido). (Moto Guzzi/)

Pricing and Variants

The Moto Guzzi V7 is available in either Special ($9,490) or Stone ($8,999) variants. A unique 100th anniversary livery is available on the Stone that celebrates the brand’s past, this model is listed at $9,190.

In comparison to the Special, the Stone replaces chrome with matte black, it also features a new saddle, full LED system, new instrument cluster, and six-spoke aluminum wheels. The Special flaunts chrome and different graphics, brown saddle, milled cylinder cooling fins, dual analog displays, and spoked rims.

The Stone comes in the Nero Ruvido color scheme as well as the new Azzurro Ghiaccio, Arancione Rame, and limited edition Centenario livery. The Special is available in two options: Blu Formale and Grigio Casual.

Competition

The Guzzi’s direct competition is Royal Enfield’s INT650. Seeing as it received a boost in displacement, its competition also includes the Triumph Street Twin and even Harley-Davidson Sportster 883.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special (Grigio Casual).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special (Grigio Casual). (Moto Guzzi/)

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The V7 has housed a 750cc V-twin since 2009, but now the model boosts up to the air-cooled 853cc V-twin while maintaining the classically Moto Guzzi transverse configuration and meeting Euro 5 emissions standards. A six-speed gearbox and shaft drive work with the engine to deliver the power; the manufacturer claims 65 hp at 6,800 rpm and 53.8 pound-feet of torque at 5,000 rpm. A vague clutch feel and abrupt fueling are a few criticisms that test rider Morgan Gales noted in his review of the new V7.

Gales also commented that the pull-to-the-right effect still occurs, but the tug has been reduced to a minor sway. The increase in power is welcome as it makes the new bike “a much more capable machine,” Gales continued. “Most of that power comes on after the 3,000 rpm mark, but the engine produces tiring vibration through the handlebars at the same point; this does not smooth out until it reaches peak torque at 5,000 rpm.”

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ruvido).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Nero Ruvido). (Moto Guzzi/)

Handling

Handling is very neutral. It drops into turns, handles low-speed maneuvers easily, and is stable on the highway. When pushed hard, however, Gales noted that the bike bobs due to the soft suspension. Adjusting the preload at the dual shocks alleviates much of the problem there, but the 40mm fork is nonadjustable.

Brakes

Braking on the V7  is done with a 320mm front disc and four-piston Brembo caliper and 260mm rear disc and two-piston caliper.

The front lever needs a fair squeeze, but it provides good feel for precise application, writes Gales. The rear setup is not too grabby and also has good feel.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Arancione Rame).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (Arancione Rame). (Moto Guzzi/)

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The manufacturer claims the V7 makes 4.9 liters/100 kilometers which equates to about 48 mpg from the 5.5-gallon tank.

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

At a tall 6-foot-4, Gales found the riding position to be comfortable with an upright body position.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special (Blu Formale).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Special (Blu Formale). (Moto Guzzi/)

Electronics

In addition to the LED lighting, the V7 is equipped with two-channel ABS, and Moto Guzzi Traction Control (MGTC). The latter has two sensitivity levels to choose from and can also be calibrated to rear tire circumference in case the rear tire is swapped.

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

The Moto Guzzi V7 has a two-year unlimited-mileage warranty.

Quality

Moto Guzzi carries over beautifully polished styling year after year, and this current model is no different. We love its lines and style. Small details from the eagle silhouette daytime running light complete the look.

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (100th Anniversary Livery).
2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone (100th Anniversary Livery). (Moto Guzzi/)

2021 Moto Guzzi V7 Claimed Specifications

MSRP: $8,999–$9,490
Engine: 853cc, air-cooled, transverse V-twin, pushrod; 2 valves/cyl.
Bore x Stroke: 84.0 x 77.0mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 5-speed/shaft
Fuel Delivery: EFI w/ 38mm mechanical throttle body
Clutch: Dry clutch
Engine Management/Ignition: N/A
Frame: Double cradle tubular steel frame
Front Suspension: 40mm telescopic fork; 5.1 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Dual Kayaba shocks, preload adjustable; 3.9 in. travel
Front Brake: Brembo 4-piston caliper, 320mm disc
Rear Brake: Brembo 2-piston floating caliper, 260mm disc
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast aluminum mags; 18 in. / 17 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: 100/90-18 / 150/70-17
Rake/Trail: 26.4°/4.2 in.
Wheelbase: 57.1 in.
Ground Clearance: 6.1 in.
Seat Height: 30.7 in.
Fuel Capacity: 5.5 gal.
Wet Weight: 481 lb.
Contact: motoguzzi.com/us_EN/
Source : Motorcyclist More   

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