2022 BMW M240i Coupe M Performance Parts: Carbon Fiber Galore

We bring a new photo gallery of the 2022 BMW M240i Coupe with M Performance Parts. The car is on-display in Munich showcasing the latest and greatest parts from the M Performance Catalog. Even though... The article 2022 BMW M240i Coupe M Performance Parts: Carbon Fiber Galore appeared first on BMW BLOG

2022 BMW M240i Coupe M Performance Parts: Carbon Fiber Galore

We bring a new photo gallery of the 2022 BMW M240i Coupe with M Performance Parts. The car is on-display in Munich showcasing the latest and greatest parts from the M Performance Catalog. Even though...

The article 2022 BMW M240i Coupe M Performance Parts: Carbon Fiber Galore appeared first on BMW BLOG

Source : BMW Blog More   

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2021 Honda CBR600RR

Buyer’s guide essential info on the 2021 Honda CBR600RR with specs, pricing, good and bad points, reviews, competition, and more.

2021 Honda CBR600RR

2021 Honda CBR600RR. (Honda/)

Ups

  • Excellent handling
  • Good suspension and brakes

Downs

  • Only adequate engine power
  • Hasn’t really changed since 2013
  • High sticker price

Verdict

Although it shows its age with its old-school underseat exhaust and cable-operated throttle, Honda’s CBR600RR is still a very good middleweight supersport machine. In typical Honda style, it doesn’t excel in any particular area, but does everything well.

2021 Honda CBR600RR.
2021 Honda CBR600RR. (Honda/)

Overview

When it made its debut in 2003, Honda’s CBR600RR was a bit underwhelming in the then-cutthroat competition of the middleweight supersport class. Major upgrades to the engine and chassis in 2007 gave it a major boost in performance to bring it on par with its rivals, although there’s only been minor changes since then; regardless, as Motorcyclist’s Adam Waheed mentioned in his review in 2020, the CBR600RR still is a very good sportbike. Honda made some significant changes for 2021 to a limited production version of the CBR, but unfortunately that version will not be sold in the US.

Updates for 2021

The only change for 2021 is a new Grand Prix Red Tricolor graphics motif, and that’s the only graphics package available.

Pricing and Variants

The CBR600RR will be available in non-ABS version for $11,899 and an ABS version using Honda’s C-ABS (Combined-ABS) that applies both front and rear brakes electronically for $12,899. The only available color scheme for 2021 is the Grand Prix Red Tricolor.

Competition

The Honda CBR600RR’s direct competition now only consists of the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R and Suzuki GSX-R600. Other comparable bikes include the Yamaha R7, Ducati Supersport 950/S, ’s Adam Waheed talk about his ride on the Triumph), Aprilia RS 660, and MV Agusta F3 800.

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The CBR’s well-developed liquid-cooled 599cc DOHC inline-four engine is equally at home zipping about in urban confines or screaming at 14,000 rpm on the racetrack. The last update to the engine was in 2013 with a centrally located ram-air intake, improved ECU, and revised PGM-DSFI programming for more midrange power and improved throttle response at high rpm. It’s definitely not the most powerful 600 engine out there, as review of the 2020 CBR600RR.

2021 Honda CBR600RR.
2021 Honda CBR600RR. (Honda/)

Handling

When Honda upgraded the CBR600RR’s suspension to a 41mm Showa BPF inverted fork and revised settings to the rear shock in 2013, it helped polish the bike’s already excellent handling characteristics. Quick and light-effort steering into corners is complemented by sure-footed stability even over rough pavement, providing good feel and communication about what’s happening at the tire contact patches.

Brakes

Four-piston radial-mount Tokico calipers and 310mm discs provide crisp, responsive stopping power with excellent feel. The ABS model is equipped with Honda’s C-ABS that automatically actuates both front and rear brakes (depending on the situation) to provide improved control in panic braking situations. When the rider pulls on the front brake lever, the rear brake is also lightly actuated; if the rider presses on the rear brake pedal beyond a certain point, the front brakes are also lightly applied.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Honda claims an average of 44 mpg with the 2021 CBR600RR.

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

The CBR600RR is a supersport machine, so it has clip-on bars, but they are set a little higher than others in the class, and there is more legroom than the competition. As a result, the ergonomics aren’t as harsh as you’d expect for a bike of this type. In typical supersport fashion, while the rider’s saddle is wide and fairly supportive, the passenger seat is mostly an afterthought (though it is better than average).

2021 Honda CBR600RR.
2021 Honda CBR600RR. (Honda/)

Electronics

The only electronic rider aid on the CBR600RR is C-ABS on the ABS model. Otherwise, the CBR is very old school, with a standard cable controlling the throttle plates, no traction control, and no switchable engine modes.

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

The 2021 Honda CBR600RR comes standard with a one-year, unlimited-mileage warranty. Extended warranty coverage of up to five years (including roadside assistance) via HondaCare is also available.

Quality

Hondas have always set the standard for quality and fit and finish in the motorcycle industry, and the CBR600RR is no exception. Although the lack of updates since 2013 are obvious, such as the black-on-gray LCD dash panel in an age of full-color TFT displays.

2021 Honda CBR600RR.
2021 Honda CBR600RR. (Honda/)

2021 Honda CBR600RR Claimed Specifications

MSRP: $11,899/$12,899 (ABS)
Engine: 599cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 16 valves
Bore x Stroke: 67.0 x 42.5mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection w/ 40mm throttle bodies
Clutch: Wet, multiple disc; cable operation
Engine Management/Ignition: DSFI/digital 3D mapping
Frame: Twin-spar aluminum chassis
Front Suspension: 41mm Showa BPF inverted fork, fully adjustable; 4.3 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa shock, fully adjustable; 5.1 in. travel
Front Brake: 4-piston Tokico radial-mount caliper, dual 310mm discs
Rear Brake: 2-piston Tokico caliper, 220mm disc
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast aluminum rims; 17 x 3.50 in. / 17 x 5.50 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: 120/70ZR-17 / 180/55ZR-17
Rake/Trail: 23.5°/3.9 in.
Wheelbase: 53.9 in.
Ground Clearance: 5.3 in.
Seat Height: 32.3 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.8 gal.
Wet Weight: 410 lb.
Contact: powersports.honda.com
Source : Motorcyclist More   

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