4 Ways Those Highest At Risk Can Help Prevent A Stroke

Here are some helpful tips to follow to reduce your risk of having a stroke regardless of initially being at a higher risk. Written By Anica Oaks / Reviewed By Ray SpottsMore

4 Ways Those Highest At Risk Can Help Prevent A Stroke
Written By Anica Oaks / Reviewed By Ray Spotts

A stroke can happen to both men and women due to an interruption to the supply of blood to the brain. Having a family history of strokes can put you at a higher risk than others for having one. Here are some helpful tips to follow to reduce your risk of having a stroke regardless of initially being at a higher risk.

Keep Your Blood Pressure Low

High blood pressure can almost quadruple your chances of having a stroke. It's best to monitor your blood pressure and activity when it's too high. You should aim for a blood pressure of 135/85. You should start by reducing salt in your diet and avoid high-cholesterol foods. Try and exercise at least three times a week for 30 minutes or more. If you currently smoke, then give it up.

Drop Those Extra Pounds

Obesity can increase your risk of having a stroke. It's best to keep your BMI at 25 percent or less. Any locum tenens stroke doctor in your area can work with you to develop a diet and exercise plan that will assist you in losing the extra weight. Aim for eating between 1,500 and 2,000 calories per day. Remember that regular exercise is key to burning extra calories throughout the day.

Alcohol In Moderation

When it comes to alcoholic beverages, you should ditch overdoing it. While studies suggest having a glass a day to reduce your risk of a stroke, more than one greatly increases your odds of having a stroke. You should aim for one glass a day and pay close attention to your portion size. A glass of wine is five ounces while beer is typically considered 12 ounces.

Exercise More

Having a regular exercise routine does wonders for reducing your risk of a stroke. Not only does exercise help you to lose weight but it will also lower your blood pressure. It's recommended to undergo an exercise routine that is considered moderate. Aim for five days a week to keep your body moving. If you have trouble starting with 30-minute programs, then consider breaking that up into two different 15-minute programs.

When it comes to preventing strokes, you have a lot that you can do about it. You don't have to be plagued by your genetics or your lifestyle. By instituting the four tips above, you can work to lower your risk of having a stroke in the future.

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Written By:
Anica Oaks is a professional content and copywriter who graduated from the University of San Francisco. She loves dogs, the ocean, and anything outdoor related. You can connect with Anica on Twitter @AnicaOaks.

Reviewed By:

Founder Ray Spotts has a passion for all things natural and has made a life study of nature as it relates to health and well-being. Ray became a forerunner bringing products to market that are extraordinarily effective and free from potentially harmful chemicals and additives. For this reason Ray formed , a company you can trust for clean, effective, and healthy products. Ray is an organic gardener, likes fishing, hiking, and teaching and mentoring people to start new businesses. You can get his book for free, “How To Succeed In Business Based On God’s Word,” at .

Source : Trusted Health Products More   

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Federal Judge Blocks Georgia’s Controversial Law Banning Most Abortions After 6 Weeks

A federal judge permanently struck down Georgia’s controversial law banning most abortions after six weeks

Federal Judge Blocks Georgia’s Controversial Law Banning Most Abortions After 6 Weeks

A federal judge permanently struck down Georgia’s controversial law banning most abortions after six weeks on Monday, ruling that it violates the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

The controversial law, which was passed in 2019, after a doctor detected fetal cardiac activity, which can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy, sometimes before a woman realizes she is pregnant. The law included some exceptions for victims of rape and incest but only if they had filed official police reports.

On Monday, District Judge Steve C. Jones ruled that the law infringed upon constitutional rights, including those established by the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade and the 1992 decision Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

“In sum, the undisputed material facts in this case lead to one, indisputable conclusion: that Section 4 of H.B. 481, by prohibiting a woman from terminating her pregnancy upon the detection of a fetal heartbeat, constitutes a pre-viability abortion ban,” Jones wrote in his decision. “As this ban directly conflicts with binding Supreme Court precedent (i.e., the core holdings in Roe, Casey, and their progeny) and thereby infringes upon a woman’s constitutional right to obtain an abortion prior to viability, the Court is left with no other choice but to declare it unconstitutional.”

“It is in the public interest, and is this court’s duty, to ensure constitutional rights are protected,” Jones continued.

The suit, SisterSong v. Kemp, was brought by advocacy groups and abortion providers including Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Georgia.

“This win is tremendous, and [it] also makes a very bold statement,” said Monica Simpson, the executive director of the suit’s lead plaintiff SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, in a statement. “No one should have to live in a world where their body and reproductive decision-making is controlled by the state. And we will continue to work to make sure that is never a reality in Georgia or anywhere else.”

In a statement to TIME, the office of Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said: “We will appeal the Court’s decision. Georgia values life, and we will keep fighting for the rights of the unborn.”

The controversial law faced widespread criticism, including from several famed filmmakers and actors who threatened to pull out of Atlanta’s multi-billion dollar film industry if the law was enacted. The law was initially going to take effect at the start of 2020, but Jones placed a preliminary injunction blocking the law in October 2019.

“The district court blocked Georgia’s abortion ban, because it violates over 50 years of Supreme Court precedent and fails to trust women to make their own personal decisions,” said Sean J. Young, the legal director of the ACLU of Georgia, in a statement. “This case has always been about one thing: letting her decide. It is now up to the state to decide whether to appeal this decision and prolong this lawsuit.”

Monday’s ruling came the same day a federal judge temporarily blocked a bill in Tennessee that would ban most abortions after the detection of fetal cardiac activity. At least seven other states passed similarly restrictive abortion laws in 2019, all of which are currently stopped in the courts.

Source : Time More   

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