6 Reasons to Start Prenatal Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy

The nine months before baby arrives are usually filled with long lists of doctor’s appointments to keep, nursery equipment to buy, and baby showers to attend. While it may seem overwhelming to add another item to your baby prep checklist, prenatal pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) is one you don’t want to leave out. More than just the occasional kegel, PFPT is even more helpful when started during pregnancy. What is Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy (PFPT)? Layers of muscles and connective tissue form your pelvic floor, like a woven hammock. Like the base of a bowl, this sling spans from The post 6 Reasons to Start Prenatal Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy appeared first on The Pulse.

6 Reasons to Start Prenatal Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy


The nine months before baby arrives are usually filled with long lists of doctor’s appointments to keep, nursery equipment to buy, and baby showers to attend. While it may seem overwhelming to add another item to your baby prep checklist, prenatal pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) is one you don’t want to leave out. More than just the occasional kegel, PFPT is even more helpful when started during pregnancy.

What is Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy (PFPT)?

Layers of muscles and connective tissue form your pelvic floor, like a woven hammock. Like the base of a bowl, this sling spans from your pubic bone back to your tail bone and holds up your pelvic organs. The pelvic floor muscles help with the alignment of your spine and pelvis.

Pelvic floor physical therapy is a specialized kind of physical therapy that can help treat chronic pain, incontinence (leaking urine or stool), and painful sex. Just like all of your muscles, regular exercise also strengthens pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic Floor Physical Therapists receive special training in exercises and techniques to help you feel better during pregnancy, labor, and postpartum. PFPT during pregnancy can: 

Prepare and strengthen your pelvic floor and vaginal tissues for labor

Through biofeedback and other therapies, your PT can help teach you about your amazing pelvic floor muscles, the nerves that make them work, and how to put them to work for you during your labor and delivery. Did you know that the muscles of your pelvic floor actually help your baby’s head rotate to fit through your pelvis? A strong pelvic floor can help the baby’s head get in the correct position for a quick and easy delivery.

Reduce your chances of injury and pain during pregnancy

Diastasis rectus, lower back pain, and sciatica can all be related to your pelvic floor. A physiotherapist can help teach you correct posture, how to effectively strengthen your core and pelvic floor muscles, and continue to exercise during pregnancy safely.

Help you recover more quickly and easily postpartum

Every postpartum mom would love to have one less worry. If you have already found a pelvic floor physical therapist you trust, like working with, and have figured out insurance coverage, you are already a step ahead. It will be more likely that you will continue with physical therapy postpartum when you might need it most. Having a physiotherapist who already knows your body and what it was like pre-baby can help them better coach you to relearn muscle coordination. Because your muscles have already done the exercises before, muscle memory will help them recover more quickly.

Reduce your chances of ) before and after delivery

Leaking urine during pregnancy is common because of the pressure and size of your growing uterus on the bladder and pelvic floor, hormonal changes, and sometimes urinary tract infections. Your pelvic floor physical therapist can help teach you strategies for managing your fluid intake, preparing for the gush that might happen when you sneeze and give you strengthening exercises to reduce leakage during pregnancy. Preparing your pelvic floor ahead of delivery means that you start in a better place postpartum to retrain your bladder and pelvic floor muscles. Postpartum, especially after a very long labor or difficult labor, women may experience urinary and bowel problems.

Help with constipation

Pushing and straining when trying to have a bowel movement is one of the most harmful things to do for your pelvic floor. Unfortunately, because of hormones and the growing uterus, constipation is a common pregnancy complaint. Pelvic floor physical therapy exercises can help teach you how to relax your pelvic floor muscles to allow the stool to pass more easily. Your friendly PT can also help you learn and practice safer and more effective ways to push during labor.

Help you enjoy sex again

Many women worry about sex after childbirth, but with some prenatal planning with your PT, you can look forward to being intimate again with your partner. Your pelvic floor muscles’ rhythmic contraction creates powerful orgasms. The stronger your pelvic floor muscles, the more intense your orgasm.

Pregnancy and childbirth put your pelvic floor to the test. You are essentially asking your pelvic floor to run a marathon. You would train for a marathon, right? So, it makes sense to train your pelvic floor with PFPT prenatally. Talk to your doctor or midwife about referring you for pelvic floor physical therapy to increase the likelihood of insurance covering your visits. Make sure to see a specially-trained pelvic floor physical therapist who has experience working with pregnant and postpartum moms. Your body will thank you!

The post 6 Reasons to Start Prenatal Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy appeared first on The Pulse.

Source : Pregistry More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Young Teens Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccination

It has been expected, but now it has happened. Following in footsteps of Canada a week before, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine against SARS-CoV2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) from a previous minimum age of 16 years down to the age of 12 years. My children —ages 14 and 12— and many of your children too, are now eligible for vaccination, so the next steps will involve appointments becoming available at various locations in all US states and in many cases the school systems getting involved The post Young Teens Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccination appeared first on The Pulse.

Young Teens Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccination

It has been expected, but now it has happened. Following in footsteps of Canada a week before, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine against SARS-CoV2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) from a previous minimum age of 16 years down to the age of 12 years. My children —ages 14 and 12— and many of your children too, are now eligible for vaccination, so the next steps will involve appointments becoming available at various locations in all US states and in many cases the school systems getting involved to help organize specific days for students to have appointments at vaccination facilities.

As emphasized in my previous article, it is very important to get your children vaccinated ASAP, for a few reasons: First, SARS-CoV2 infection in children can lead to severe disease, although much more rarely compared with adults, but children can spread the virus to vaccine-hesitant adults. Moreover, to get the pandemic under control, we need to get a lot of people vaccinated. It comes down to a numbers game related to the capability of the virus to spread, and so to compensate for the numerous anti-vaxxer adults and the adults who are hesitating because they believe, mistakenly, that the vaccines are risky and want other people to take the risks in their stead, millions of children, beginning with the young teens, are standing by ready to step up to the plate. Vaccination is a community thing. They are a component of public health, emphasis on the word public. Like agreeing to turn off the lights and use blackout curtains in your home during an air raid in London in World War II, the argument about contributing to the protection of the community must be balanced against the argument about your personal freedoms.

If you have been reading what we have been posting here on The Pulse about a variable used in epidemiology called the R0 (pronounced R naught), it will seem very straightforward. R0 represents the average number of people that an already-infected individual infects. If R0 equals 1, then each infected person infects just one other person, which means that that the number of cases does not increase over time. If R0 equals 2, then each infected person infects two other people, so the number of infected people doubles over the average amount of time that the infection takes to spread from person to person, and the number of cases doubles over an amount of time that depends both on how long it takes for the infection to spread from person to person and how long it takes for people to become symptomatic.

In the case of SARS-CoV2, the R0 is now thought to be in the range of 2.5 to 4, with the more infectious variants being closer to 4 than 2.5. Maybe, some variants are emerging with an R0 higher than 4, for instance approaching 5, but let’s use an R0 of 4.0 here. In order to get control over the pandemic, we need herd immunity, which means having a certain minimum fraction of people immune, either through vaccination or previous infection with the virus to prevent the virus from increasing its prevalence in the community. That needed fraction depends on the R0 and there is an equation for calculating it. You take the reciprocal of the R0, meaning 1 divided by the R0, and then you subtract that number from 1. Thus, for a variant of SARS-CoV2 whose R0 equals 4.0, we divide 1 by 4, which gives us 0.25, then we subtract 0.25 from 1, which gives us 0.75, or 75 percent, meaning that for herd immunity we need a minimum of 75 percent of all people who are in interacting community to be immunized, either through vaccination or having been infected with the virus. Now, certainly there are places with higher fractions of the population being vaccine hesitant or anti-vaxx and other places where people are more compliant about getting their vaccines, but overall, we are talking about 75 percent, and experts think we should consider 80 percent as the target, because of new variants that may have an R0 closer to 5.0 (1/5 = 0.2; 1-0.2 = 0.8). Except in places where nearly all of the adults get vaccinated, we cannot get to 75 percent or 80 percent of people, if the children are not vaccinated too. And so there is a direct connection between the vaccine hesitancy among adults and the need for COVID-19 vaccination to be expanded to children.

As noted above, the new EUA extension making COCID-19 vaccination available to children ages 12 and up is for the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine, but additional EUA extensions down to age 12 also are anticipated for Moderna and Janssen (Johnson and Johnson). Meanwhile, the Novavax vaccine may receive an EUA covering adults very soon, with lower ages to follow and clinical trials are in progress for COVID-19 vaccines in children ages 11 years down to 6 months.

The post Young Teens Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccination appeared first on The Pulse.

Source : Pregistry More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.