Adam Scott burns bright at end with four birdies, two eagles in seven holes, moves into contention at CJ Cup

Fortunes can turn quickly in Vegas. Sometimes to the good, more often to the bad. For Adam Scott, it was to the better.

Adam Scott burns bright at end with four birdies, two eagles in seven holes, moves into contention at CJ Cup

LAS VEGAS – Fortunes can turn quickly in Las Vegas.

Sometimes to the good, more often to the bad.

For Adam Scott, it was to the better.

The 2013 Masters champion was moseying around The Summit Club during Friday’s second round of the CJ Cup, heading to the 12th tee after consecutive bogeys and seeing he was 13 shots behind leader Keith Mitchell.

Then the man from Down Under started to go way under par.

Over his last seven holes, Scott made four birdies and two eagles to suddenly jump up the scoreboard into a tie for second place. Scott finished with a 9-under 63 to move to 13 under, five shots behind leader Keith Mitchell.

Scott was sterling as he made birdies from 2 feet on 12, 5 feet on 13, 4 feet on 15 and nine feet on 17. His eagle on the par-5 14th came from three feet, his eagle on the par-5 18th from five. His lone non-circle hole came on the par-3 16th where he got up-and-down from a greenside bunker for par.

Scott is trying to win his 15th PGA Tour title and first since the 2020 Genesis Invitational.

“You can’t expect a finish like that, but I’m going to take it,” Scott said. “I hit a lot of shots close and that made light work with the putter. Put myself in contention. I mean, I’m a long way back still, but 36 holes to go, I like where I’m at, moving in the right direction. I’d love to have a nice solid day tomorrow.

“Hopefully that wasn’t all the wind in my sail.”

Scott started sailing after making bogeys at 10 and 11 and falling well behind.

“Felt like I was playing in another tournament,” he said. “I needed to get something going.”

He got it going, indeed.

“I needed to just play aggressive and I went driver off the tee at 14, which is maybe unusual to say for a par‑5, but a lot of guys are not hitting driver. I just thought, well, if I want to have a chance at this tournament, I’ve got to probably hit one up there,” he said. “Hit an iron on the green close and make an eagle and that’s what I did. I hit a 6‑iron in and it rolled down to a couple of feet.

“Then on 18 I hit a poor drive actually, hung it out to the right in a bunker, but I had a good yardage and I had a good lie and I hit a 5‑iron, got it online and finished about five feet from the hole.

“I can handle those eagle putts.”

Source : Golf Week More   

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First mom to graduate from the Symetra Tour overcomes four-stroke penalty for having daughter's U.S. Kids club in the bag

Rachel Rohanna ultimately finished 10th on the Symetra Tour money list to once again earn the last card.

First mom to graduate from the Symetra Tour overcomes four-stroke penalty for having daughter's U.S. Kids club in the bag

The first time Rachel Rohanna graduated from the Symetra Tour in 2015, she squeaked in the final card by $284. It was a valuable every-shot-counts lesson.

Earlier this year during the final round of the Copper Rock Championship, Rohanna reached into her bag to pull out a club and discovered that daughter Gemelia’s 23-inch club had slipped to the bottom. She called over a rules official and received a four-stroke penalty for having a U.S. Kids 7-iron as her 15th club.

Rohanna, 30, couldn’t help but look at the money list to see how much the oversight had cost her. Could that $900 be what keep her from earning back her LPGA card?

“That was haunting me the entire time,” said Rohanna, who ultimately finished 10th on the Symetra Tour money list to once again earn the last card. This time, however, $4,429 separated her from No. 11 Beth Wu.

Rachel Rohanna celebrates graduating from the Symetra Tour with daughter Gemelia. (courtesy photo)

Rohanna, who won the 2017 Symetra Tour Championship when she was six weeks pregnant, is believed to be the first mom to earn LPGA status through the developmental tour. With no daycare available on the Symetra Tour, Rohanna spent about half the season on the road with 3-year-old Gemelia – with help from family – and half the time traveling on her own. She and husband Ethan Virgili own ERV Cattle Co. in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, and lead jam-packed lives.

The family butcher shop opened back up last month and now that she’s home, Rohanna will help out there from time to time. There’s a big cattle sale coming up, and the couple hope to soon have 90 calves born on the ranch.

Farm life feels an awful lot like being a tour professional at times – long hours, varying paydays, nothing happens overnight and it often feels like a 24/7 job.

There are times when Gemelia goes to practice with her mom, and times she’s up at 4 a.m. with dad checking on the cattle. The couple has a tremendous support system of grandparents and great-grandparents.

“I guess (Ethan) and I never really went into marriage or parenthood with some type of assumed roles with things,” said Rohanna. “We just both knew we were teammates in this, and we were both willing to work extremely hard with our careers and do the best that we can to raise a human.”

While support from her community and sponsors has been terrific, Rohanna said, there have been enough negative comments along the way that have spurred her on.

“It’s really hard, isn’t it?

“You’re probably going to give up soon.”

“You’re not going to be able to do this.”

“Who’s watching your daughter?”

“It blows my mind that people actually have the nerve to say that your face,” said Rohanna.

Ethan has actually flown on his own with Gemelia more than Rachel – coming out to meet her on the road – and she marvels at the number of women who go out of their way to help him on the plane.

She often feels judged for continuing to pursue a career as a touring pro, while at the same time, some assume her husband can’t take care of the family while she’s gone.

“I get frustrated on his behalf,” she said.

Rachel Rohanna poses with husband Ethan and daughter Gemelia. (courtesy photo)

Two big keys to the consistency of the season, Rohanna said, involved changing from an interlocking to overlap grip at the start of the year, and working with Callaway’s Barry Lyda to change the lie of her clubs from standard to three degrees flat.

“Honestly, without his suggestion,” she said, “I know I wouldn’t have been scoring as well this season.”

During a two-week break in the schedule with three events left in the season, Rohanna and Gemelia tested positive for COVID-19. It worked out well that they could quarantine on the ranch while they recovered and practice in the front yard. The closest neighbor resides a half mile away.

Rohanna felt weaker as the season wound down and dealt with cramps. She ultimately tore a muscle near her rib cage and felt the most pain when she tried to sleep. Rohanna wasn’t sure how much of her troubles could be attributed to end-of-season wear and how much to COVID-19, but she knew there was no choice left but to grind.

“I told myself I’ve made it this far,” she said. “I’m not going to let anything get in my way at this point.”

Source : Golf Week More   

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