Alberta votes against equalization in a province-wide referendum

Politics Insider for Oct. 20, 2021: A vote against equalization; new mayors in Calgary and Edmonton; Green Party cuts The post Alberta votes against equalization in a province-wide referendum appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Alberta votes against equalization in a province-wide referendum

Welcome to a sneak peek of the Maclean’s Politics Insider newsletter. Sign up to get it delivered straight to your inbox in the morning.

Albertans voted on Monday in a province-wide plebiscite calling for the equalization system (an area of federal jurisdiction) to be removed from the constitution, and while the results won’t be known for another week, it looks like it passed. Advocates say this should lead to reform in the program, the Post reports.

Kevin Lacey, the Alberta director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, described the referendum as one of the “biggest and most significant constitutional referendums” since the Charlottetown Accord’s failure in 1992. “Albertans delivered a clear message that while they’re willing to contribute to Canada, they won’t be taken advantage of anymore and the results show that Albertans want to stand up and they want to see change,” Lacey told the National Post.

Just a baby step: Political scientist Barry Cooper the next step ought to be a referendum on independence.

Not a big deal: Other political scientists, though, say the vote carries no legal weight and won’t force Ottawa to do anything.

“A change in the Constitution requires something close to total consensus right across Canada,” said Eric Adams, a professor at the University of Alberta specializing in constitutional law. “I don’t think it’s a surprise to anybody that Alberta is nowhere near reaching that consensus on equalization, and I don’t think that’s going to change.”

Waters muddied: In the Globe, Andrew Coyne argues amusingly that the rest of Canada should ignore the vote.

Moreover, the results in Alberta are anything but “clear.” Not only is the majority unlikely to much exceed 50 per cent, but the meaning of the vote was greatly muddied by the Premier, Jason Kenney, who insisted it was not about the question on the ballot – the one that he put there – but rather about giving Alberta “leverage” to demand changes to the program.

Again, this would be sufficient for the rest of Canada to ignore the result. A referendum on an explicit demand for a specific constitutional change is one thing, but a referendum that has been publicly and repeatedly described by its sponsors as a giant bluff practically begs to be disregarded.

Focus on seats: In the Calgary Herald, Rob Breakenridge argues persuasively that adding three seats to the House of Commons for chronically underrepresented Alberta will do more than the referendum to give Alberta clout in Ottawa.

New mayors: Edmonton and Calgary also elected new mayors, both of whom are of first-generation Canadians with Punjabi heritage.

Vaccine mandate on Hill: MPs will have to be vaccinated to enter the parliamentary precinct, the board of internal economy has decided, CTV reports. Will some Conservatives object? There is reason to wonder. The Western Standard likens the unjabbed to Soviet spies.

Green job cuts: The Green Party is laying off staff as the party brass look to shave costs, CP reports. Also, Annamie Paul is still the leader, apparently.

Paul, who announced last month she would resign, remains in the top spot as she negotiates with Green executives about compensation for costs incurred during legal battles with the party, sources say.

N.B. ousts Mountie: The Blaine Higgs government has pushed out the top New Brunswick Mountie, Assistant Commissioner Larry TremblayJacques Poitras reports for CBC. Public Safety Minister Ted Flemming wrote to Commissioner Brenda Lucki in July asking the for the change, and for the force to make drug crime a higher priority.

How they lost: Defeated CPC MP James Cumming is set to examine how Tories lost votes to both the PPC and NDP as part of his review of the recent election for the party, CP reports. “Anywhere that we’ve had bleed of vote, I think that that’s important that we study and understand what the factors were, so the PPC would represent some of that. In Alberta we saw significant bleed of vote to the NDP, so that’s an entirely different situation … in all cases we have to look at where we performed and where we didn’t perform and do that analysis on a riding-by-riding basis, region-by-region basis to better understand what the dynamics are within that vote.”

— Stephen Maher

The post Alberta votes against equalization in a province-wide referendum appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Source : Maclean's More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

What’s next for Quayside? The resumes of the four teams vying to reimagine Toronto’s waterfront might offer a hint

The builders and designers behind Toronto’s The One condos, Montreal’s New Vic and a Smithsonian museum in Washington are some of the people hoping to fill the gap left by Sidewalk Labs to develop the expansive Quayside lands on Toronto’s east-end waterfront. The portfolios of the four shortlisted teams competing for the opportunity to redevelop Quayside range from constructing or designing new social housing units, to lakeside condos, sleek office towers and eye-catching public spaces.As part of the request for proposal (RFP) process, the teams, consisting of well-established local developers joining forces with high-profile architects — several of the architects having international credentials — are putting together their visions for the future of the empty 12-acre parcel of land that Google sister company Sidewalk Labs abandoned last year.Waterfront Toronto, the tri-government corporation that owns most of the Quayside land, located near Parliament Street and Queens Quay East, will decide the finalist early next year, a spokesperson said recently.Critics suggest the new development at Quayside can’t just be about condos and retail, but must include public connections to the waterfront as well as vibrant spaces for recreation and cultural events.“We’re trying to establish ourselves as a global city with significant waterfront development. We have failed on that front in many respects to date,” says Shauna Brail, an associate professor with the University of Toronto’s Institute for Management and Innovation.Our waterfront is less accessible than other cities, she goes on to say.“We’ve been slow. You can look to many great examples in the last 15 to 20 years at changes to our waterfront and improvements to accessibility, but we still have the wall of the Gardiner Expressway and the wall of tall towers that closes off access to the water,” Brail says.“So here (Quayside) is this amazing opportunity to do things right and well and effectively on the waterfront and we can’t squander it again,” she adds.The four shortlisted collaborations for the redevelopment of Quayside are:Quayside Impact LP, a team consisting of Dream Unlimited Corp. and Great Gulf working together with lead architects Adjaye Associates, Alison Brooks Architects, along with Henning LarsenThe Daniels Corp and Hullmark Developments Ltd., teaming up with lead architect Diamond Schmitt Architects Inc.Hines Canada Management II ULC, which features Hines Canada joining forces with Tridel Builders Inc. and lead architect Foster + PartnersKMT Quayside Developments Inc., a collaboration between Kilmer, Mattamy Homes and Tricon, with lead architects MVRDV and Cobe.Assistant professor Petros Babasikas, director of the honours bachelor of arts in architectural studies program at U of T’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, says the teams of developers and architects promises the possibility of an “integrated design approach” for Quayside — an approach that considers not only private development and condos, but also the public domain.“To me the integration of architecture, urbanism and different programs — public, civic, commercial, and market uses — will be the primary driver here and hopefully that’s a balance developers and architects can strike in making their proposals to (Waterfront Toronto),” Babasikas says.As part of the process for Quayside, the proponents are not allowed to speak to the media or the public about their proposals.But looking at the backgrounds of some of the RFP participants could provide some insights into the directions the teams might take.“The results of each one of these (four) collaborations I think, at least architecturally will be very interesting,” Babasikas says.“Some of these firms are really innovative and their portfolios are based on experimentation,” he adds.Quayside Impact LPTeam: Dream Unlimited Corp. and Great Gulf, with lead architects Adjaye Associates, Alison Brooks Architects, along with Henning LarsenNotable buildings: Canary District (Dream), One Bloor (Great Gulf), Smithsonian’s Museum of African American History and Culture (Adjaye)Quayside Impact team member Dream Unlimited is a leading real estate firm, with $12 billion in assets stretching across North America and Europe.Dream is one of the members of the partnership with all three levels of government that created the mixed-use Canary District housing development east of the downtown core in the West Don Lands.The George Brown College residence at Cherry and Front streets, and adjoining Cooper Koo YMCA building in the Canary District area, is a Dream creation, known for its large glass windows.Great Gulf, Dreams’ partner on the Quayside pitch, has developed several iconic buildings in the city, including the Monde condo building on the waterfront, with its signature wavy design. Great Gulf is also the developer of the One Bloor condo highrise at Yonge and Bloor.On the architectural side of that team, U.K.-based Alison Bro

What’s next for Quayside? The resumes of the four teams vying to reimagine Toronto’s waterfront might offer a hint

The builders and designers behind Toronto’s The One condos, Montreal’s New Vic and a Smithsonian museum in Washington are some of the people hoping to fill the gap left by Sidewalk Labs to develop the expansive Quayside lands on Toronto’s east-end waterfront.

The portfolios of the four shortlisted teams competing for the opportunity to redevelop Quayside range from constructing or designing new social housing units, to lakeside condos, sleek office towers and eye-catching public spaces.

As part of the request for proposal (RFP) process, the teams, consisting of well-established local developers joining forces with high-profile architects — several of the architects having international credentials — are putting together their visions for the future of the empty 12-acre parcel of land that Google sister company Sidewalk Labs abandoned last year.

Waterfront Toronto, the tri-government corporation that owns most of the Quayside land, located near Parliament Street and Queens Quay East, will decide the finalist early next year, a spokesperson said recently.

Critics suggest the new development at Quayside can’t just be about condos and retail, but must include public connections to the waterfront as well as vibrant spaces for recreation and cultural events.

“We’re trying to establish ourselves as a global city with significant waterfront development. We have failed on that front in many respects to date,” says Shauna Brail, an associate professor with the University of Toronto’s Institute for Management and Innovation.

Our waterfront is less accessible than other cities, she goes on to say.

“We’ve been slow. You can look to many great examples in the last 15 to 20 years at changes to our waterfront and improvements to accessibility, but we still have the wall of the Gardiner Expressway and the wall of tall towers that closes off access to the water,” Brail says.

“So here (Quayside) is this amazing opportunity to do things right and well and effectively on the waterfront and we can’t squander it again,” she adds.

The four shortlisted collaborations for the redevelopment of Quayside are:

  • Quayside Impact LP, a team consisting of Dream Unlimited Corp. and Great Gulf working together with lead architects Adjaye Associates, Alison Brooks Architects, along with Henning Larsen

  • The Daniels Corp and Hullmark Developments Ltd., teaming up with lead architect Diamond Schmitt Architects Inc.

  • Hines Canada Management II ULC, which features Hines Canada joining forces with Tridel Builders Inc. and lead architect Foster + Partners

  • KMT Quayside Developments Inc., a collaboration between Kilmer, Mattamy Homes and Tricon, with lead architects MVRDV and Cobe.

Assistant professor Petros Babasikas, director of the honours bachelor of arts in architectural studies program at U of T’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, says the teams of developers and architects promises the possibility of an “integrated design approach” for Quayside — an approach that considers not only private development and condos, but also the public domain.

“To me the integration of architecture, urbanism and different programs — public, civic, commercial, and market uses — will be the primary driver here and hopefully that’s a balance developers and architects can strike in making their proposals to (Waterfront Toronto),” Babasikas says.

As part of the process for Quayside, the proponents are not allowed to speak to the media or the public about their proposals.

But looking at the backgrounds of some of the RFP participants could provide some insights into the directions the teams might take.

“The results of each one of these (four) collaborations I think, at least architecturally will be very interesting,” Babasikas says.

“Some of these firms are really innovative and their portfolios are based on experimentation,” he adds.

Quayside Impact LP

Team: Dream Unlimited Corp. and Great Gulf, with lead architects Adjaye Associates, Alison Brooks Architects, along with Henning Larsen

Notable buildings: Canary District (Dream), One Bloor (Great Gulf), Smithsonian’s Museum of African American History and Culture (Adjaye)

Quayside Impact team member Dream Unlimited is a leading real estate firm, with $12 billion in assets stretching across North America and Europe.

Dream is one of the members of the partnership with all three levels of government that created the mixed-use Canary District housing development east of the downtown core in the West Don Lands.

The George Brown College residence at Cherry and Front streets, and adjoining Cooper Koo YMCA building in the Canary District area, is a Dream creation, known for its large glass windows.

Great Gulf, Dreams’ partner on the Quayside pitch, has developed several iconic buildings in the city, including the Monde condo building on the waterfront, with its signature wavy design. Great Gulf is also the developer of the One Bloor condo highrise at Yonge and Bloor.

On the architectural side of that team, U.K.-based Alison Brooks Architects has designed mixed-use developments that have garnered praise.

The firm was nominated for an award in 2017 for designing Ely Court, a regenerated housing initiative that turned a rundown public housing project in northwest London, U.K., into three midrise blocks of contemporary housing containing about 44 units.

Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye, head of Adjaye Associates, has been knighted for his community-oriented designs known around the world. His work includes the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

Hines Canada Management II ULC

Team: Hines Canada and Tridel Builders Inc., with lead architect Foster + Partners

Notable buildings: CIBC Square (Hines), Aqualuna (Tridel/Hines), The One (Foster + Partners)

Hines and Tridel are well-established real-estate developers in Toronto. Hines is the global firm partnering with Canadian real estate investment, development and asset management company Ivanhoé Cambridge to develop the massive CIBC Square office complex near Bay and Front streets.

Tridel has an extensive portfolio that includes work with Hines on large condo highrises on the waterfront — the Aqualuna, Aquavista and Aquabella buildings.

Tridel is also the driving force behind the Alexandra Park redevelopment — a 12 to15-year remaking that is happening at the 7.2-hectare community near Bathurst and Dundas streets, where just over 400 rent-geared-to-income (RGI) units are being replaced, nearly 400 RGIs refurbished and 1,540 new market condos created.

Tridel was also picked late last year by Toronto Community Housing to take over as the new developer in the remaining phase four and five revitalization of Regent Park.

Foster + Partners, the architectural lead with Hines and Tridel on their Quayside proposal, designed The One, a mixed-use residential building set to be completed in a few years at Yonge and Bloor. Once completed it will become Canada’s tallest building at 80 storeys.

The Daniels Corp. and Hullmark Developments Ltd.

Team: The Daniels Corp. and Hullmark Developments Ltd., with lead architect Diamond Schmitt Architects Inc.

Notable buildings: Regent Park Revitalization (Daniels), Montreal’s New Vic (Diamond Schmitt)

The team of the Daniels Corp. and Hullmark Developments sees two major players on Toronto’s development landscape joining forces.

Daniels is best known for partnering with Toronto Community Housing to launch the multibillion-dollar master planned revitalization of Regent Park. Formerly a massive cluster of public housing buildings, the community is now a mixed-housing community with condos, townhouses, new public housing buildings, a new park, a large new swimming pool, a bank, restaurants and more.

Hullmark has developed several interesting buildings in the city, including a wood frame office midrise in Liberty Village.

Partnering with those developers on the Quayside RFP is Diamond Schmitt Architects, one of the top Canadian architectural firms. They created the design for the New Vic, a project in Montreal that involves the transformation of the former heritage buildings of the Royal Victoria Hospital into a new McGill University campus.

KMT Quayside Developments Inc.

Team: Kilmer, Mattamy Homes and Tricon, with lead architects MVRDV and Cobe

Notable buildings: Amsterdam’s Silodam housing (MVRDV)

KMT Quayside Developments, a collaboration of Kilmer, Mattamy Homes and Tricon, is a union of firms with portfolios and expertise that includes rental housing, business development, investments and infrastructure.

On the architectural side of the team Netherlands-based MVRDV has designed housing developments throughout Europe, include the eye-catching Silodam, units of housing contained in a multicoloured block of housing that sits in Amsterdam harbour.

Danish architectural firm Cobe, designed two of three mixed-use buildings slated for Toronto’s West Don Lands area, buildings slated to be the home for hundreds of rental units, 30 per cent of which will be affordable.

Senior managers with Waterfront Toronto, in addition to representatives from the city and CreateTO, an agency that manages the city’s portfolio of real estate assets, comprise the evaluation committee for the RFP process for Quayside.

The evaluation committee will make recommendations to a steering committee, which in turn will make a recommendation to Waterfront Toronto’s board of directors.

“Waterfront Toronto continues to work with the shortlisted proponents through the RFP stage of the process and we look forward to selecting a preferred proponent for the (Quayside) development in 2022,” Waterfront Toronto spokesperson Carol Webb said in a recent statement.

Donovan Vincent is a housing reporter based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @donovanvincent

Source : Toronto Star More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.