Amyloidosis and Pregnancy

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Amyloidosis, go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared. __________________________________ Amyloidosis is a rare disorder caused by the abnormal buildup of a protein called amyloid in your tissues and organs. Amyloid is not normally found in your body and its accumulation means that the tissues and organs cannot function properly: this can lead to life-threatening organ failure. Men are more likely to get amyloidosis than women. People of African descent The post Amyloidosis and Pregnancy appeared first on The Pulse.

Amyloidosis and Pregnancy

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Amyloidosis, go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared.

__________________________________

Amyloidosis is a rare disorder caused by the abnormal buildup of a protein called amyloid in your tissues and organs. Amyloid is not normally found in your body and its accumulation means that the tissues and organs cannot function properly: this can lead to life-threatening organ failure.

Men are more likely to get amyloidosis than women. People of African descent are at a higher risk of a genetic mutation that is associated with a specific type of amyloidosis that affects the heart.

Overall, there are approximately 4000 new cases of amyloidosis in the United States every year. Most people are diagnosed with amyloidosis between ages 50 and 65 years old, but people as young as 20 years old may be diagnosed. Most cases of amyloidosis are fatal, with patients surviving 1 to 2 years after diagnosis.

New diagnoses of amyloidosis are rare during pregnancy, but pre-existing amyloidosis can lead to serious complications for mother and child.

 Types of amyloidosis

There are different types of amyloidosis and they are distinguished by the cause of the protein buildup and the location of the amyloid deposits.

AL amyloidosis is the most common type; it used to be called “primary amyloidosis.” “AL” stands for “amyloid light chains,” which is the specific protein responsible for this type of amyloidosis. There is no known cause of AL amyloidosis, but it occurs when the bone marrow makes abnormal antibodies that cannot be broke down by your body. It is often associated with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, and it can cause dysfunction in the kidneys, heart, liver, intestines, and nerves.

AA amyloidosis was previously called “secondary amyloidosis.” This is amyloidosis caused by another condition such as chronic infections or autoimmune diseases. “AA” stands for amyloid protein type A. This type of amyloidosis mostly affects the kidneys, but it can also affect the digestive tract, liver, and heart.

Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a genetic disease that mainly affects people in the region of the Mediterranean basin, including those of Turkish, Armenian, Arab, and non-Ashkenazi Jewish descent. FMF’s main complication is AA amyloidosis that affects the kidneys.

Other types of amyloidosis include dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), familial (hereditary) amyloidosis, age-related systemic amyloidosis, and organ-specific amyloidosis. These are rarer that AA and AL types and affect a variety of organs. Amyloid plaques have been identified in Alzheimer’s disease, but these differ from the protein deposits in amyloidosis: the brain is rarely affected by amyloidosis.

Amyloidosis symptoms

 Symptoms of amyloidosis are often subtle and hard to identify. They also vary greatly depending on the type of amyloidosis and what organs are affected. Many of the symptoms overlap with those of other diseases, so it is important to discuss your symptoms with your doctor in order to ensure an accurate diagnosis. You will likely undergo laboratory tests, a biopsy, and imaging tests such as MRI or echocardiogram in addition to a complete physical exam.

Symptoms of amyloidosis include:

  • Skin changes such as thickening, easy bruising, and purplish patches around the eyes
  • Severe fatigue
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Joint pain
  • Anemia (low red blood cell count)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of the tongue
  • Tingling and numbness in legs and feet
  • Swelling of ankles and legs
  • Weak hand grip
  • Severe weakness
  • Sudden weight loss
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Difficulty swallowing

Treatment of amyloidosis

 Amyloidosis has no cure. Treatment is aimed at slowing the development of protein deposits and managing the symptoms. Specific treatments will depend on the type, severity, and location of amyloidosis and may include:

  • Chemotherapy
  • Stem-cell transplant
  • Steroids
  • Liver or kidney transplant
  • Diuretic medications
  • Compression stockings to relieve swelling
  • Dietary changes

Amyloidosis in Pregnancy

 Pre-existing amyloidosis can complicate a pregnancy and cause miscarriage, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Additionally, amyloidosis can cause renal damage during pregnancy.

If you have amyloidosis, speak with your doctor before you try to conceive or as soon as you find out you are pregnant.

The post Amyloidosis and Pregnancy appeared first on The Pulse.

Source : Pregistry More   

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Pregnancy

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared. __________________________________ Are you experiencing tingling, numbness, or pain in your hand? Do you find that you’re dropping things much more lately? You could have carpal tunnel syndrome—something many pregnant women experience especially in the third trimester of pregnancy. What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? You may have heard of carpal tunnel syndrome in relation to spending too much time The post Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Pregnancy appeared first on The Pulse.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Pregnancy

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared.

__________________________________

Are you experiencing tingling, numbness, or pain in your hand? Do you find that you’re dropping things much more lately? You could have carpal tunnel syndrome—something many pregnant women experience especially in the third trimester of pregnancy.

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

You may have heard of carpal tunnel syndrome in relation to spending too much time typing at your desk. You’ve probably seen some of the fancy wrist pads and keyboard designs that may be helpful in preventing and/or easing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Surprisingly, carpal tunnel syndrome is something around 50% of pregnant women may experience during their pregnancy whether or not they spend the day typing.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which a nerve called the median nerve becomes trapped and squeezed in a narrow passageway on the underside of your wrist called the carpal tunnel. This entrapment is usually caused by inflammation of the tissue (the synovium) surrounding the median nerve in the small area that also houses many tendons that connect to the muscles in your hands. Inflammation of tissues can be caused by overuse (spending your workday typing at a computer).

The median nerve travels down your arm and forearm, through the carpal tunnel. It innervates the thumb, forefinger, middle finger, and half of your ring finger. Symptoms of numbness, tingling, and weakness could be felt in these areas.

How Does Pregnancy Cause Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

It’s no secret that pregnancy can cause swelling in your feet and ankles. That swelling can also be seen in other areas, including the hands and wrists. This swelling can compress the tight passageway in your wrist through which the median nerve travels, causing irritation.

Other risk factors for pregnancy-related carpal tunnel syndrome include having gestational diabetes or gestational hypertension (high blood pressure).

How Do I Know It’s Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Your physician can most likely diagnose you clinically (without any invasive procedures) by listening to you explain your symptoms and by performing a simple exam maneuver whereby she attempts to elicit Tinel’s Sign. She does this by tapping the underside of your wrist and hand where the median nerve travels to see if it produces the same symptoms of discomfort you have experienced. She may also ask you to hold your wrists together in front of you in a flexed position to see if you experience numbness or tingling. Furthermore, she will evaluate the muscles of your hand to see if there is any weakening. Electromyography can also be performed, though as stated above, the diagnosis can most likely be made clinically.

Should I Get Surgery to Relieve my Symptoms?

If you were to ask your doctor about getting surgery to relieve symptoms of pregnancy-related carpal tunnel syndrome, she would most likely say no. Your carpal tunnel syndrome is likely to subside after you give birth.

There are many non-surgical ways to relieve the pain, numbness, and tingling associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. First, there are wrist braces that can be used. These braces are designed to be used while sleeping to minimize the flexion of your wrists. (Unbeknownst to us, we tend to flex our wrists while asleep, constricting and aggravating the already irritated carpal tunnel.) Second, there are exercises you may find helpful, such as wrist extension stretches and working on grip strength. Another option is to take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or paracetamol. Make sure you carefully follow the manufacturer’s directions for use because overuse could lead to liver toxicity. Remember, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are NOT recommended during pregnancy. Rest and ice are also good options for pain relief.

If the above methods don’t work for you, your doctor may suggest a steroid injection, whereby, just as it sounds, steroids are injected into the underside of your wrist to reduce inflammation and irritation. This is usually very effective for the short term. You may find that you need more than one injection because the effects wear off over time. However, multiple injections beyond two or three are not recommended.

The Lowdown

If you are pregnant and experiencing weakness, numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands and wrists, you are not alone. You may be experiencing pregnancy-related carpal tunnel syndrome and you are not alone. It is estimated that around 50% of pregnant women experience this due to the swelling that often accompanies pregnancy especially in the third trimester. Non-surgical methods of pain relief are recommended due to the fact that the carpal tunnel syndrome will most likely subside after giving birth.

The post Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Pregnancy appeared first on The Pulse.

Source : Pregistry More   

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