Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella to become test event for theatre reopening

Ministers are planning to run test events at outdoor festivals with large crowds and at theatre productions, including Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella, before mid-July. Read more: Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella to become test event for theatre reopening

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella to become test event for theatre reopening

Ministers are planning to run test events at outdoor festivals with large crowds and at theatre productions, including Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella, before mid-July.

The government is sanctioning the move for up to 20 sporting and cultural events after delaying by four weeks its plans to scrap restrictions on social distancing.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport held a call with the entertainment industry yesterday about the plans, which will involve theatres, music venues and outdoor festivals.

Lloyd Webber had threatened to open his theatres at full capacity in contravention of the rules. Oliver Dowden, the culture secretary, spoke to him last week after he challenged the government to arrest him for opening his theatres.

Lloyd Webber said that he would only agree to his production of Cinderella being a test event if it was part of a wider scheme for the whole industry.

“Oliver Dowden suggested the possible idea of pilot events at the end of last week,” Lloyd Webber said. “I have made it very clear that I will not take part in any pilot scheme unless it is representative of theatre and live music as a whole. However, if that is the case and the health people are insisting that they really need more pilots before they let us all re-open, I’ll take part, but I reiterate I absolutely will not unless I am assured that Cinderella is part of a much wider scheme.”

Industry figures have criticised ministers for offering pilot schemes for high-profile events while leaving smaller venues to deal with the consequences of the four-week delay. Craig Hassall, the Royal Albert Hall chief executive, said that he was getting “bitter and twisted” about the decision-making process.

“A cynical person would say: ‘Isn’t it funny that the test events being mooted now are the Wimbledon final, a car race and probably a Cinderella production by Lloyd Webber?’” he told Times Radio.

Greg Parmley, chief executive of LIVE, which represents the live music industry, said: “The latest phase of pilots is unnecessary and seems designed only to allow a few high-profile events to go ahead while the rest of the sector is devastated.”

Those who want to attend the events will be required to prove either that they have had both doses of a vaccine or a recent negative test.

Download festival will be taking place in Leicestershire this weekend with an audience of 10,000, a tenth of its usual size, as part of an earlier government pilot scheme. Some major sporting events, including Euro 2020 football matches and the British Grand Prix, will also go ahead with large crowds. The government said on Monday that the men’s and women’s finals at Wimbledon would take place with a full Centre Court of 15,000 spectators.

Hassall claimed that ministers were overlooking concert halls in favour of mass-market events. “It’s galling that the pilots being mooted are of course the most popular events,” he said.

Asked if he was tempted to follow Lloyd Webber and challenge the government to arrest him, Hassall said: “No. We will always follow the government guidance. We’ve done so much to make the Royal Albert Hall safe.”

Read more:
Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cinderella to become test event for theatre reopening

Source : Business Matters More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Business groups join MPs and farmers demanding consultation over Australia trade deal

Business groups have joined MPs in urging Liz Truss, the international trade secretary, to consult them on the final trade agreement with Australia Read more: Business groups join MPs and farmers demanding consultation over Australia trade deal

Business groups join MPs and farmers demanding consultation over Australia trade deal

Business groups have joined MPs in urging Liz Truss, the international trade secretary, to consult them on the final trade agreement with Australia amid concerns that a lack of transparency could lead to sectors including farming being damaged.

While an agreement in principle for a post-Brexit trading relationship has been reached between Britain and Australia, details of the deal remained thin on the ground yesterday.

Minette Batters, president of the National Farmers Union, said: “It is critical that the government engages with industry on the details of the deal as soon as possible and that parliament is involved much more during the final stages of the negotiations to ensure it has sufficient oversight of the agreement.”

A group of 24 cross-party MPs yesterday called for parliamentary scrutiny of the deal, which they warned could put farmers out of business. Sir Roger Gale, a Conservative MP who sits on the UK Trade and Business Commission, said that the public and MPs were united. “They agree that we must not allow our food standards to be lowered or farming communities to be sold out in a trade deal with Australia,” he said.

Australian farmers will gain greater access to the UK market, with tariffs on beef and sheep phased out over 15 years, the Australian government said. Dairy and sugar tariffs will be eliminated over five and eight years, respectively. Tariffs will be cut on UK exports including Scotch whisky and cars. It is the first trade deal that goes beyond rolling over a pre-existing trade relationship with the European Union.

William Bain, head of trade policy at the British Chambers of Commerce, said: “It is businesses not governments that trade. We urge the government to engage closely with businesses [to get the greatest value out of the deal].”

Rain Newton-Smith, chief economist of the CBI, Britain’s biggest business lobby group, said: “It is essential now that both sides ensure meaningful safeguards are put in place for industries, including agriculture and high environmental standards.”

The agreement was welcomed by Britain’s financial and professional services sectors, which will benefit from a free flow of data provisions and lower compliance costs.

The final text of the agreement is expected to include a detailed chapter on innovation.

Read more:
Business groups join MPs and farmers demanding consultation over Australia trade deal

Source : Business Matters More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.