Anthony Joshua And Oleksandr Usyk Treat Boxing Like The Serious Business It Is

By: Sean Crose In an era where a big mouth has become almost more important than boxing skills (it's sad, but true), it's nice to see men like Anthony Joshua and Oleksandr Usyk meet in the ring. Neither man is what you'd call ordinary. Usyk is a character and Joshua isn't at all afraid to get in front of the public eye. Yet both men, who are going to fight Saturday in England for the WBA, IBF, and WBO heavyweight titles, are acting like adults in the leadup to their highly anticipated match. They've spoken of and to each other respectfully, and have more or less gone about their fight week activities as professionals. As Michael Corleone might say, "it's only business." Compare this to next month's third go round between Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder and you'll find a chasm nearly as wide as the Atlantic Ocean between the two pairs of fighters. Fury is nothing like Wilder except for the fact both men have over the top personalities. Yet it's the one thing they have in common that draws people to them...aside, of course, from their ring skills, which are considerable. Which is why both Fury and Wilder can get a pass when it comes to showy behavior. The Paul brothers, on the other hand... The truth is that we live in an era where louder is better, where boastfulness tops genuine achievement. That's as true for boxing as it is for pretty much any other public endeavor. Perhaps it was always that way, and those who occupy this particular moment in history have chosen to embrace that reality with a passion never before seen. No matter. The truth is that fights like Logan Paul vs Floyd Mayweather will have more sizzle than Joshua vs Usyk because people like the sizzle at the expense of the steak (a quick aside - Mayweather was undoubtedly a great fighter, but he certainly knows the Paul fight wasn't a serious matter). Joshua and Usyk, however, are onto something. They know that when all is said and done, even the loudest person in the room can't take away massive achievements. And just getting to a bout the level of Joshua-Usyk is a massive achievement. People may love loud talk, but it can be cheap when it's not backed up. Joshua and Usyk have been able to let their fists essentially do the talking thus far. And they'll most likely continue to Saturday in Britain. That's what makes this bout such a must see event for serious fans. The post Anthony Joshua And Oleksandr Usyk Treat Boxing Like The Serious Business It Is appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Anthony Joshua And Oleksandr Usyk Treat Boxing Like The Serious Business It Is

By: Sean Crose

In an era where a big mouth has become almost more important than boxing skills (it's sad, but true), it's nice to see men like Anthony Joshua and Oleksandr Usyk meet in the ring. Neither man is what you'd call ordinary. Usyk is a character and Joshua isn't at all afraid to get in front of the public eye. Yet both men, who are going to fight Saturday in England for the WBA, IBF, and WBO heavyweight titles, are acting like adults in the leadup to their highly anticipated match. They've spoken of and to each other respectfully, and have more or less gone about their fight week activities as professionals. As Michael Corleone might say, "it's only business."

Compare this to next month's third go round between Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder and you'll find a chasm nearly as wide as the Atlantic Ocean between the two pairs of fighters. Fury is nothing like Wilder except for the fact both men have over the top personalities. Yet it's the one thing they have in common that draws people to them...aside, of course, from their ring skills, which are considerable. Which is why both Fury and Wilder can get a pass when it comes to showy behavior. The Paul brothers, on the other hand...

The truth is that we live in an era where louder is better, where boastfulness tops genuine achievement. That's as true for boxing as it is for pretty much any other public endeavor. Perhaps it was always that way, and those who occupy this particular moment in history have chosen to embrace that reality with a passion never before seen. No matter. The truth is that fights like Logan Paul vs Floyd Mayweather will have more sizzle than Joshua vs Usyk because people like the sizzle at the expense of the steak (a quick aside - Mayweather was undoubtedly a great fighter, but he certainly knows the Paul fight wasn't a serious matter).

Joshua and Usyk, however, are onto something. They know that when all is said and done, even the loudest person in the room can't take away massive achievements. And just getting to a bout the level of Joshua-Usyk is a massive achievement. People may love loud talk, but it can be cheap when it's not backed up. Joshua and Usyk have been able to let their fists essentially do the talking thus far. And they'll most likely continue to Saturday in Britain. That's what makes this bout such a must see event for serious fans.

The post Anthony Joshua And Oleksandr Usyk Treat Boxing Like The Serious Business It Is appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Source : Boxing Insider More   

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Book Review: Championess by Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes

By: Stephanie Kent On a shelf of books about boxing, you’ll find no shortage of fighter memoirs, compilations of short stories, and fitness guides. Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes’ graphic novel Championess is a unique addition to the boxing canon.  Based loosely on the true story of female prizefighter Elizabeth “Lizzie” Wilkinson, the book follows her journey to win bare-knuckle fighting matches that bring in enough money to get her sister out of debt. Little is known about the history of the real Wilkinson, but in Championess, we find the fictional athlete has no shortage of things to fight for. The fictionalized version of this figure is the heart of the story. Her witty internal monologue and lack of filter pull us through the story and it’s fun to read her internal monologue while she fights, trains, and reflects on her dark familial past.  Flashbacks to a family torn apart by poverty play out to raise the stakes of Wilkinson’s fights, but the sections about the sport are far and away the most exhilarating. Lizzie’s relationship with her trainer is one any young, scrappy newcomer to a gym will see themselves in, and the book even features a training montage complete with chicken chasing. The timelessness of boxing conveyed in this book is delightful to read.  The book is exciting; artfully drawn fights take place against an ambitious story about racism, classism, and gender equality. The narrative is full of pressure for the female fighter to be more British, more maidenly, more manly, even. These parts of the story cut to the heart of the feeling we all have about not being enough, and in the end, the book, like every fight, is about far more than winning a boxing match. The post Book Review: Championess by Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Book Review: Championess by Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes

By: Stephanie Kent

On a shelf of books about boxing, you’ll find no shortage of fighter memoirs, compilations of short stories, and fitness guides. Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes’ graphic novel Championess is a unique addition to the boxing canon. 

Based loosely on the true story of female prizefighter Elizabeth “Lizzie” Wilkinson, the book follows her journey to win bare-knuckle fighting matches that bring in enough money to get her sister out of debt. Little is known about the history of the real Wilkinson, but in Championess, we find the fictional athlete has no shortage of things to fight for. The fictionalized version of this figure is the heart of the story. Her witty internal monologue and lack of filter pull us through the story and it’s fun to read her internal monologue while she fights, trains, and reflects on her dark familial past. 

Flashbacks to a family torn apart by poverty play out to raise the stakes of Wilkinson’s fights, but the sections about the sport are far and away the most exhilarating. Lizzie’s relationship with her trainer is one any young, scrappy newcomer to a gym will see themselves in, and the book even features a training montage complete with chicken chasing. The timelessness of boxing conveyed in this book is delightful to read. 

The book is exciting; artfully drawn fights take place against an ambitious story about racism, classism, and gender equality. The narrative is full of pressure for the female fighter to be more British, more maidenly, more manly, even. These parts of the story cut to the heart of the feeling we all have about not being enough, and in the end, the book, like every fight, is about far more than winning a boxing match.

The post Book Review: Championess by Taryn Shanker, Kelly Zekas, and Amanda Perez Puentes appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Source : Boxing Insider More   

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