Apple Expands Mac Pro Support with Three New AMD Graphics Cards

Apple has added three new graphics card modules for the Mac Pro that it says are designed to deliver a large performance boost to the computer’s graphics horsepower specifically in GPU-heavy applications. Apple says the new modules are based on AMD’s next-generation graphics processor, the Radeon Pro W6000-Series GPU, and comes in three variants: the […]

Apple Expands Mac Pro Support with Three New AMD Graphics Cards

Apple has added three new graphics card modules for the Mac Pro that it says are designed to deliver a large performance boost to the computer’s graphics horsepower specifically in GPU-heavy applications.

Apple says the new modules are based on AMD’s next-generation graphics processor, the Radeon Pro W6000-Series GPU, and comes in three variants: the Radeon Pro W6800X MPX Module, Radeon Pro W6800X Duo MPX Module and the Radeon Pro W6900X MPX Module.

The addition of the new graphics card options should greatly expand the power of the computer for apps that strongly rely on the GPU, like DaVinci Resolve and Final Cut Pro.

Graphics performance options have been widely expanded on Apple’s customization page, which now has a total of 10 possible configuration choices when building a Mac Pro. The computer can now come outfitted with one Radeon Pro W6800X with 32 gigabytes (GB) of GDR6 memory for $2,400 or two for $5,200. One step up, the Radeon Pro W6900X with 32GB of GDDR6 memory will cost $5,600 or $11,600 for two. Finally, a single Radeon Pro W6800X Duo with 64GB of GDDR6 memory will run $4,600, or two for $9,600.

The Mac Pro supports two MPX Modules and when those are populated with two W6800X Duo cards, they can deliver up to 60 teraflops of graphics performance and 128GB of memory. Because these graphics modules are made by AMD, they likely also feature AMD’s Infinity Fabric Link, which allows up to four GPUs (via the two Duo modules) to connect at 84 GB/s per link in each direction, which is five times faster than the PCIe bus.

Each module also adds four additional Thunderbolt 3 ports and an HDMI 2.0 port, which greatly expands the input options on the computer in addition to ramping up its power.

These new additions now make it so that a fully loaded Mac Pro will run $54,748 for those who want the most expensive configuration options available. Previously, the most expensive model cost $52,600.

Recent rumors state that Apple is currently working on a new Mac Pro, but it was not clear if that meant a whole new full-sized workstation or if the company was planning on expanding the line into something like a Mac Pro Mini. Apple adding more options to the current Mac Pro seems to indicate that it doesn’t plan to sunset this particular model quite yet though, and the new machine should be significantly more powerful fully loaded than before, which expands the amount of time it will remain useful for creative professionals.

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Photos Contain ‘Layers of Mind’, Study Finds

Photographs contain “layers of mind.” That’s according to a new study, which found that people are considered to be “less real” and have “less mind” when they’re seen in photos of photos rather than photos themselves. The study was led by psychology professor Dr. Alan Kingstone of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and […]

Photos Contain ‘Layers of Mind’, Study Finds

Photographs contain “layers of mind.” That’s according to a new study, which found that people are considered to be “less real” and have “less mind” when they’re seen in photos of photos rather than photos themselves.

The study was led by psychology professor Dr. Alan Kingstone of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and it was published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

According to researchers, these layers in photographs have never been noticed by scientists before.

“Pictures have been part of human culture for thousands of years,” Kingstone states in a press release by UBC. “The idea that we can discover something new about them at this stage is really exciting. We found that pictures contain layers of mind.”

Researchers analyzed how people perceived the people they saw in photos, both people directly captured by a camera as well as people seen in photos or posters within a photograph.

“For example, suppose you are standing next to a poster of your face, and someone takes your photo,” Kingstone says. “The new photo contains your face twice—once in the poster and once beside it.

“Both faces are just different regions of the same photo, but people perceive the photo within the poster as being more removed from reality and having less capacity to experience feelings or make plans.”

Just as a person in a photograph feels less real than a person in real life, a person in a photo of a photo feels less real than a person in a photo (and a person in a photo of a photo of a photo feels less real than a person in a photo of a photo) — it’s layers of mind all the way down.

Before you dismiss the research as having no real-world significance, get this: the scientists found that these layers affect peoples’ behavior and decisions.

“We also found that people would give a person within an image less consideration and attention,” says study co-author Dr. Rob Jenkins of England’s University of York. “In our experiments, participants donated the least money to a person in a photo of a photo.”

The findings are also relevant to more and more of our lives being moved online, through things like social media photo sharing and videoconferencing. And because “mind perception” is foundational in how humans make moral judgments, when someone’s mind is perceived in a lesser way, that person will likely be judged in a lesser way as well.

“There are many professional situations that involve pictures of people,” Jenkins says. “When these activities are moved online, the pictures become one step further removed from reality.

“For example, during a virtual trial, a judge may see pictures of a victim on video. Our findings suggest the judge may be less inclined to view the victim as real and vivid, which could affect how the case unfolds.”

In addition to courtrooms, everything from business meetings to healthcare visits to classrooms has moved to videoconferencing, and perhaps many repercussions of this shift remain to be seen.


Image credits: Stock photos licensed from Depositphotos

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