Apple Streusel Muffins

These crumbly apple streusel muffins are sure to become your new favorite treat. They are perfectly spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, and bursting with fall flavor in each bite! Apples are a must when making any fall dessert. They are so soft and juicy when baked, and their tart flavor pairs perfectly with warm spices!…

Apple Streusel Muffins

These crumbly apple streusel muffins are sure to become your new favorite treat. They are perfectly spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, and bursting with fall flavor in each bite!

Apples are a must when making any fall dessert. They are so soft and juicy when baked, and their tart flavor pairs perfectly with warm spices! Apple galette, tart, and cobbler are more rustic desserts to try out this fall!

Apple streusel muffins in a muffin tin.

Cinnamon Apple Streusel Muffin Recipe

As much as I love some pumpkin, I think apple recipes are highly underrated for fall. Apple is king in my book. The way the tart, sweet flavor of apple blends with cinnamon and nutmeg is so delicious. It’s a classic pairing! Then, put it in muffin form and you have a seriously tasty treat on your hands. My caramel apple cupcakes have been a favorite at our house recently, but I think these apple streusel muffins are just as good, if not better! Topping the muffins with streusel makes them taste like little pastries. It’s all the buttery goodness that you need in your life right now. They are absolute perfection!

Take them to a potluck. Serve them at a birthday party. Have them with coffee. These tasty muffins will shine no matter the occasion! When I pull these out of my oven, 1- the smell is to die for, and 2- it is beyond difficult not to gobble one up in all of its steamy, warm goodness. Whether you choose to eat them as-is or with a little cinnamon honey butter inside, you’re going to love how perfectly sweet and moist these are. They’re the perfect dessert or breakfast, honestly, and I haven’t been able to get enough! These apple streusel muffins are soft, sweet, and ready to please. Just the kind of thing your family will go crazy over!

Ingredients for Apple Streusel Muffins

Don’t let the hefty ingredient list fool you, these are all things you have in your pantry right now! The key here is just to use the freshest apples possible. Looking for measurements? You can find them in the recipe card below!

Muffin Base

  • Eggs: Eggs are used as a binding agent and to add moisture.
  • Sour Cream: This is the secret ingredient for getting your muffins as moist as possible! It bumps up the fat content in your batter. It also adds a hint of a tangy flavor which I find to be delicious!
  • Butter: I use unsalted, melted butter in this recipe. Because of the added fat content, it helps to keep your muffins moist. It also adds a tasty rich flavor!
  • Granulated Sugar: This is what’s going to make your muffins perfectly sweet. It melts down to create the perfect texture during the baking process!
  • All-Purpose Flour: Not only is it what I typically have on hand, but all-purpose flour also makes your muffins light and airy! This is because it doesn’t have a high protein content.
  • Baking Powder and Baking Soda: Using both baking powder and baking soda is a must! They keep your muffins from becoming dense.
  • Salt: Add salt to enhance flavor!
  • Cinnamon: This is what’s going to give your muffins their perfect fall flavor! It’s the perfect addition of warm spice.
  • Nutmeg: Also a necessity! Nutmeg is warm, sweet, and woody.
  • Apples: You can use just about any apple variety here. I like using Granny Smith for their tart flavor! No matter the apple you choose, just make sure they are fresh, peeled and diced! See more tips on choosing apples below.

Streusel Topping

  • All-Purpose Flour: For the best light and crumbly structure!
  • Granulated Sugar: This will add the perfect sweetness to your streusel.
  • Brown Sugar: For a little extra depth and rich sweetness!
  • Cinnamon: You can never have enough cinnamon in fall desserts! Pop some into your streusel for added tastiness.
  • Cold Butter: Using diced cold butter is super important here! The low temperatures will make your topping nice and crumbly.

How to Make Apple Cinnamon Streusel Muffins

Making homemade muffins is much easier than you’d think! They come together in just a few simple steps. In no time, your kitchen will be filled with the amazing smells of apple and autumn spice!

  1. Preheat Oven and Prep Pan: Let’s make some muffins! To begin, preheat your oven to 350° Fahrenheit. Line a baking pan with cupcake liners. Set aside.
  2. Prepare Streusel: Now on to the streusel. Start by mixing the flour, sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon together. Then, cut in the butter using a pastry cutter or a fork until you have pea sized clumps remaining
  3. Mix Wet Ingredients and Sugar: In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, sour cream, melted butter and sugar.
  4. Mix Dry Ingredients: In another bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg.
  5. Combine Wet and Dry Ingredients: Next, add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until just combined. Stir in the apples.
  6. Fill Liners and Top With Streusel: Use a large cookie scoop to fill the baking cups 2/3 of the way full. Sprinkle the streusel over the tops of the muffins.
  7. Bake and Serve: Bake for 20-25 minutes, until they turn golden brown and set in the center. Allow the muffins to cool before serving.
Process shots of preparing muffin batter.

Tips for Making the Best Streusel Muffins

Hardly anything says fall quite like spiced apples. These muffins are perfect for a cool crisp fall morning or for serving as a dessert. Here are a few tips to help you make the best apple streusel muffins! They’ll be a hit.

  • Vegetable Oil: Using vegetable oil instead of butter in this recipe will give your muffins a more tender crumb. It also adds moisture. If you’d like to substitute the oil for butter, you may, but know that the crumb will change the texture.
  • Diced Apples: You can dice your apples large or small for this recipe, but I like a smaller dice so the apple gets more evenly distributed throughout the batter.
  • Apple Varieties: There are several different types of apples that hold up well to baking. Granny Smith apples are nice and tart and hold their shape, while Honeycrisp are sweeter, larger and hold their shape just as well. Braeburn or Pink Lady apples are bursting with flavor and a popular choice!
  • Don’t Overfill: Only fill your muffin tin 2/3 of the way full. If you overfill them, they may spill over the sides and stick to the pan.
Apple streusel muffins on a wire rack.

Storing Apple Muffins

These muffins do very well at room temperature and can be stored for up to 5 days. I would avoid storing them in the fridge as that can make the streusel topping become wet and sticky.

  • In the Refrigerator: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. Let come to room temperature before serving.
  • In the Freezer: You can store your muffins in freezer bags for up to 3 months. Let them thaw overnight in the fridge before eating.
  • Reheating: To reheat, wrap your muffin in a paper towel and pop it in the microwave for 10-15 second intervals. Serve when warmed through.
A muffin torn into 2 pieces on a wire rack.

Caramel Apple Pie

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Apple Streusel Muffins

These crumbly apple streusel muffins are sure to become your new favorite treat. They are perfectly spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, and bursting with fall flavor in each bite!
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword apple streusel muffins
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 18 Muffins
Calories 246kcal
Author Alyssa Rivers

Ingredients

  • 2 large Eggs
  • 1 Cup Sour Cream
  • ½ Cup Unsalted butter melted
  • 1 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Cups All Purpose Flour
  • 1 Teaspoon Baking Powder
  • ½ Teaspoon Baking Soda
  • ½ Teaspoon Salt
  • 1 Teaspoon Cinnamon
  • ¼ Teaspoon Nutmeg
  • 1 ½ Cup Apples Peeled and Diced

Streusel

  • ½ Cup All Purpose Flour
  • ¼ Cup Granulated Sugar
  • ¼ Cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon Cinnamon
  • 6 Tablespoons Cold Butter diced

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350° and line a baking pan with cupcake liners. Set aside.
  • Prepare the streusel by mixing the flour, sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon together. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter or a fork until you have pea-sized lumps remaining
  • In a large bowl whisk together the eggs, sour cream, melted butter, and sugar.
  • In another bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
  • Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until just combined. Stir in the apples. Use a large cookie scoop to fill the baking cups 2/3 of the way full. Sprinkle the streusel over the tops of the muffins.
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes, until starting to turn golden brown and set in the center. Allow the muffins to cool before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 246kcal | Carbohydrates: 32g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 51mg | Sodium: 149mg | Potassium: 86mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 18g | Vitamin A: 390IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 38mg | Iron: 1mg
Source : The Recipe Critic More   

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Chicken stock

This is a recipe for a classic French-style homemade chicken stock. It’s vastly superior to any store-bought stock, and is one of the main ingredients that distinguishes home and restaurant cooking. I like making chicken stock because it’s easy compared to beef stock, and improves just about everything – the main goal here! Chicken stock... Get the Recipe The post Chicken stock appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Chicken stock

This is a recipe for a classic French-style homemade chicken stock. It’s vastly superior to any store-bought stock, and is one of the main ingredients that distinguishes home and restaurant cooking. I like making chicken stock because it’s easy compared to beef stock, and improves just about everything – the main goal here!

Chicken stock recipe

Chicken stock is made by infusing water with the flavours of chicken, fresh root vegetables and herbs. Good restaurants always make their own stocks, and is the secret to why their dishes often have that richer, deeper, “restaurant-quality” taste to them!

If you’re not convinced why you’d bother making homemade chicken stock, let me persuade you:

Ladle scooping up Homemade chicken stock

Bones for chicken stock

I use chicken bones to make chicken stock. I find that it makes a great all-rounder, clear stock with good flavour at store-bought strength. Specifically, I use chicken carcasses (see photo below) which litre for litre are also the most economical cut. They’re readily available here in Sydney from butchers and even grocery stores.

Some recipes will opt to use chicken pieces with meat and skin to make stock. I share my thoughts on this below! (Spoiler: I don’t agree!)

Raw chicken bones carcasses for Homemade chicken stock
Raw chicken carcasses for homemade chicken stock.

Here are my thoughts on other chicken cuts that are sometimes used for chicken stock:


Vegetables and herbs for stock

Here are the other ingredients in homemade chicken stock:

Ingredients in Homemade chicken stock

How to make chicken stock

A brown stock refers to a stock where the bones are roasted and the tray deglazed before simmering, as you would do with beef stock. A brown chicken stock has a deep, complex, roasted flavour as well as a darker colour.

A white chicken stock on the other hand simmers raw bones. The result is a cleaner, more neutrally flavoured and fresh-tasting stock that’s overall more versatile for cooking – versatile enough to be used with seafood or non-chicken meat dishes. This is the kind of stock we’re making today.

A nice side benefit is there’s no bone-roasting malarkey to take care of first, which makes the whole process much quicker and less messy. Just dump everything in a pot, add water and simmer!

How to make Homemade chicken stock
  1. Put everything in a large stock pot Place the chicken carcasses, vegetables, herbs and water in a large 7 litre/quart stock pot. 3 litres / quarts of water should just about cover everything. If not, do a bit of squiggling to fit the carcasses etc more snugly in the pot, but don’t break or crush the bones else this will make the stock murky.

    We want everything submerged so the water gets infused with flavour. Don’t worry if a bit of bones is poking above the water surface because it will collapse once it starts cooking and end up under the water.

  2. Scoop off scum – Bring the pot to a rapid simmer over medium high heat. As it starts getting hot, you will see foam on the surface which is the impurities in the chicken. Scoop it off and discard to keep your stock nice and clear.

  3. Simmer 3 hours – Once the water comes to a rapid simmer, lower the heat so it’s bubbling very gently. Then leave to simmer for 3 hours with the lid off.

  4. After simmering – The photo above shows the water level after 3 hours. It’s reduced by around 1/3.

    Your chicken stock is done! Now we just need to strain it, remove excess fat (if you want) and store it! Here’s how:

How to make Homemade chicken stock
  1. Strain – Using the lid of the pot to hold the bones and vegetables in the pot, strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer into another pot or large bowl. I use a pot in case I need to reduce it.

    GOAL – 2 litres / quarts of chicken stock. In a perfect world, you will end up with 2 litres / quarts of chicken stock. But it is rarely a perfect world! And that’s ok. If you have less, just top up with water. If you ended up with more than 2.25 litres / quarts, then reduce it on the stove, else you run the risk of a weak flavoured chicken stock.

  2. Leftover bones and vegetables – These have been well stripped of flavour and nutrition, so they aren’t really of any use for human consumption. However, I do pick off excess meat for Dozer! But after that, I just discard the remnants.

  3. Voila! Admire your beautiful clear chicken stock!

  4. Divide between storage containers – At this point, I divide the stock up into jars or containers which allows the stock to cool faster.

    I store my chicken stock in 1 cup multiples which I find quite handy for use. Always label your containers with the quantity of chicken stock and date you made it!

How to make Homemade chicken stock
  1. Cool then fridge – Once the stock is cooled to room temperature, place them in the fridge to fully cool. Never put hot stock in the fridge!

  2. Solidified fat – As the stock cools, the fat will rise to the surface. Once fridge cold, the fat solidifies and turns white on the surface of the stock.

    You will also notice that the chicken stock firms up into a jelly-like consistency when cold. This is due to the gelatine which gives the stock richness that you don’t get in liquid store-bought stock. So basically, jelly consistency = good stock!

  3. Scrape off fat – Scrape the fat off the surface using spoon then discard. This is actually an optional step. It makes the stock nice and clear so it’s a great all rounder that can be used for everything from clear soups (like Chinese Noodle Soup) to rich sauces (like the sauce of a Creamy Chicken Pasta).

    But if you are intending to use the stock for things like stews and creamy sauces that do not require a clear, low fat chicken stock like we desire for things like Chicken Noodle Soup, then there is no need to remove the fat.

  4. Storing – Homemade stock will keep for 5 days in the fridge for 6 months in the freezer. 

    Fridge cold chicken stock can be used as is, in the gelatinous jelly-like state. It melts into liquid form very quickly.

    If frozen, thaw overnight in the fridge, microwave, or run the container under hot water to loosen then melt in a saucepan. I use all methods depending on how much time I have!

Here’s a jar of refrigerated chicken stock which has had the fat scraped off the surface.

Jar of cold Homemade chicken stock

Pouring homemade chicken stock into pot for Chicken Fricasse
Pouring homemade chicken stock into a dish that I’ll be sharing on Wednesday! (PS It’s French – and it’s fabulous!)

What to do with homemade chicken stock

This homemade chicken stock can be used for any recipe that calls for chicken stock. It will elevate any dish from great homemade food to top-notch-restaurant quality!

Homemade stock particularly makes a difference in dishes that don’t have a heavy reliance on other flavours like spices, sauces or a heavy dose of cheese! Some examples include:

On Wednesday, I’m going to be sharing a recipe that really benefits from homemade chicken stock. It’s great made with store bought, but when made with homemade, it takes it to company-worthy! – Nagi x


Watch how to make it

Large pot of Homemade chicken stock being made
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Chicken stock recipe

Recipe video above. Homemade stock is one of the key differentiators between good home cooking and excellent restaurant food. It's also unsalted, meaning you can control the level of sodium.
Chicken stock is a great low effort homemade stock – no rinsing or roasting prep, just plonk everything in a pot and let it simmer for a few hours. While some recipes will call for chicken meat to be used, I find it wasteful plus you miss out on the nutrients from chicken bones. Chicken carcasses are inexpensive and even available at grocery stores these days.
Makes 2 litres / 2 quarts. Fridge 5 days or freezer for 6 months.
Course stocks
Cuisine French, Western
Keyword chicken stock
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings 2 litres / quarts
Author Nagi

Ingredients

  • 2 kg/ 4 lb chicken frames (ie carcasses, Note 1)
  • 1 carrot (medium), unpeeled, cut into 4 equal pieces
  • 1/2 onion , peeled and halved
  • 1 celery stem , cut in four (use the leaves too)
  • 1/2 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar (Note 2)
  • 2 bay leaves , fresh (or 1 dried)
  • 2 thyme sprigs (or 1/2 tsp dried leaves)
  • 3 parsley sprigs
  • 3 litres / 3 quarts water (just tap water, cold)

Instructions

How to make chicken stock:

  • Fill pot: Place all the chicken stock into a large stockpot (7 litre/quarts+). The should just about cover the bones. (Note 3)
  • Scoop off scum: Bring to a boil on medium high heat. Scoop off and discard any foam that collects on the surface using a ladle (helps make stock clear).
  • Simmer 3 hours: Turn stove down to low and simmer for 3 hours with no lid. Stove should be low enough so the surface is barely rippling and you just get a gentle bubble every now and then. Too rapid = murky stock.
  • Strain: Using a lid to hold the the bones and vegetables in the pot, pour the stock through a fine sieve into another pot or large bowl.
  • Goal – 2 litres/quarts: You should have 2 litres / quarts. If you have more than 2.25L/Q, reduce by simmering on low (else it will be too weak). If you have less, top up with water.
  • Fill jars/containers: Measure out into containers for storage and faster cooling. (I do multiples of 1 cup)
  • Cool: Allow to cool on the counter then refrigerate. This will make any fat rise to surface and solidify.
  • Discard fat: Scrape fat off the surface and discard.

Storing and using:

  • Ready to use! This stock is equivalent in strength to store-bought stock, so it can be used 1:1 in any recipe calling for chicken stock.
  • Store for 5 days in the fridge or freezer for 6 months. (Note 6)
  • Salt adjustment (Note 5): Homemade stock is unsalted whereas store-bought stock is salted. Add 1/4 tsp salt for every 1 cup homemade chicken stock (250ml) to match the salt level of store-bought low sodium chicken stock.
  • To use: Cold stock has a jellied consistency (Note 4). It takes barely a minute to turn liquid on a medium high stove, or microwave. You can also just add it in jelly form straight into dishes, but sometimes you may need to liquify it to measure.

Notes

1. Chicken carcass –
2. Cider vinegar – Helps extract nutrients out of the bones.
3. Fitting in pot – Arrange the bones and vegetables so they fit snugly, but don’t crush/break the bones as this will make the stock murky. The water should just about cover the bones. Don’t worry if they are sticking out a bit, they will collapse as they cook.
4. Stock consistency when cold is jelly like due to gelatin. Gelatin gives the stock richness that you don’t get in liquid store-bought stock.
5. Salting – homemade stock is not salted, intentionally so it can be massively reduced to make things like jus without becoming too salty. You cannot make fine sauces like jus using store bought stock.
6. Storing – Homemade stock will keep for 5 days in the fridge for 6 months in the freezer.
Fridge stored – When fridge cold, it becomes gelatinous (jelly-like) from the collagen in the bones which makes the stock rich and tasty, as well as nutritious. This is is a sign of a well made stock that you don’t get in store bought stock! When heated, it becomes liquid. But there’s no need to heat it, just use in the gelatinous state!
Frozen – Either thaw overnight in the fridge, microwave, or run the container under hot water to loosen then melt in a saucepan. I use all methods depending on how much time I have!

Life of Dozer

He really believes in his heart that I made that mini strawberry cream cake just for him…..

The post Chicken stock appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Source : Recipe Tin Eats More   

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