Atlantic 460 used boat report: This aft-cabin cruiser oozes Dutch class

Our resident used boat expert Dave Marsh explains how to find a good Atlantic 444 or Atlantic 460 on the secondhand market.The Atlantic 460 cuts a contrasting shape to the Fairline Phantom 430 behindShould you look closely at the picture below of the Atlantic 460 in the water, you’ll spot a year 2000+ era Fairline Phantom 43 in the background, all sleek swoopy windows and streamlined styling. Nowadays that’s all changed, and designers are cramming as much glass into their bulky superstructures as they can, the aim being […] This article Atlantic 460 used boat report: This aft-cabin cruiser oozes Dutch class appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

Atlantic 460 used boat report: This aft-cabin cruiser oozes Dutch class

Our resident used boat expert Dave Marsh explains how to find a good Atlantic 444 or Atlantic 460 on the secondhand market.

The Atlantic 460 cuts a contrasting shape to the Fairline Phantom 430 behind

Should you look closely at the picture below of the Atlantic 460 in the water, you’ll spot a year 2000+ era Fairline Phantom 43 in the background, all sleek swoopy windows and streamlined styling.

Nowadays that’s all changed, and designers are cramming as much glass into their bulky superstructures as they can, the aim being to bring the outside world into the heart of the saloon.

So it seems amusing that over three decades ago, the UK’s most prolific motorboat designer of the 20th century – John Bennett – was doing that very thing on his conservatively styled aft cabin cruisers for the likes of Atlantic and Broom.

Article continues below…


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Those long uninterrupted saloon windows are at the heart of the Atlantic 460 and 444’s appeal. Well, that and having a pair of ensuite cabins at opposite ends of this 46ft (14m) long boat.

That polar separation allowed the middle of the boat to be fashioned as a single expansive open-plan space, complete with comfy seating and a galley and a dinette, all basking in the abundant light flooding in through those big windows.

With no intrusive bulkheads and only four steps between the saloon and the galley, it’s a very sociable space, and a few more quick steps speeds you up to the raised helm and the cockpit.

atlantic-460-used-boat-video

The Atlantic 460 cuts a contrasting shape to the Fairline Phantom 43 behind

Until you retire to bed, nobody is ever far from anybody else. I’ve been lucky enough to do a little cruising on this type of boat, and when they’re underway they feel and function more like a modern sportscruiser (where the saloon flows into the cockpit) than a flybridge boat.

However, their single raised helm position offers the truly open-air driving experience that only the flybridge boat can, but with the option of incrementally closing that area down with various canopies when the weather turns nasty.

When bedtime arrives, on a cruiser this size nothing can match the privacy offered by a boat with ensuite cabins whose front doors are 20 foot apart.

Of course, the Atlantic 460 and 444 cannot be all things to all men. A 46ft (14m) long flybridge boat would undoubtably provide far more deck space overall.

Read our full Atlantic 460 used boat report in the September 2021 issue of MBY, out August 5.

Atlantic 460 specification

LOA: 46ft / 14.0m
Beam: 14ft9in / 4.50m
Draught: 4ft0in / 1.22m
Air draught: 11ft2in / 3.40m
Displacement: 15 tonnes
Fuel capacity: 396 imp gal / 1,800lt
Water capacity: 148 imp gal / 675lt
Engines: Twin 480hp Volvo Penta TAMD75Ps
Top speed: 26 knots
Cruising speed: 19 knots
Cruising range: 260nm
Built from: 1990-2006
Current market value: £150,000-£295,000

This article Atlantic 460 used boat report: This aft-cabin cruiser oozes Dutch class appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

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Smartgyro SG40 vs Seakeeper SK9: Boat stabilisers compared

Thanks to new owners Yanmar, Smartgyro’s latest range of efficient, easy-to-install and competitively priced gyroscopic stabilisers now has the firepower to challenge market leaders Seakeeper. Let battle commence…Installing an SG80 on a Riva VertigoUntil recently boat owners looking for an effective means of stabilisation at anchor have faced a fairly simple choice between fins and gyro stabilisers. But whereas the market for fin stabilisers is well served by a number of players such as Sleipner, Trac, Quantum, Humphree, CMC and others, the options for gyro stabilisers have been […] This article Smartgyro SG40 vs Seakeeper SK9: Boat stabilisers compared appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

Smartgyro SG40 vs Seakeeper SK9: Boat stabilisers compared

Thanks to new owners Yanmar, Smartgyro’s latest range of efficient, easy-to-install and competitively priced gyroscopic stabilisers now has the firepower to challenge market leaders Seakeeper. Let battle commence…

Installing an SG80 on a Riva Vertigo

Until recently boat owners looking for an effective means of stabilisation at anchor have faced a fairly simple choice between fins and gyro stabilisers. But whereas the market for fin stabilisers is well served by a number of players such as Sleipner, Trac, Quantum, Humphree, CMC and others, the options for gyro stabilisers have been rather more limited.

Thanks to the compact size and efficiency of its vacuum-sealed gyroscopes (most gyro competitors use larger unsealed flywheels), Seakeeper has become the default choice for many owners and manufacturers alike.

Now, however, there’s a new kid in town with both the technology and the financial clout to rival its American counterpart.

Article continues below…


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Italian start-up

Smartgyro was launched in 2014 by a small group of ex-military engineers with the knowledge and determination to build their own take on a vacuum-sealed gyroscopic stabiliser. Based in Italy’s boatbuilding heartland of La Spezia, it made steady inroads into its home market but it wasn’t until the Yanmar Group took a majority stake in the company in 2018 that things started to take off.

Now, with the financial power and the distribution network to become a major global player, it has recently launched two new gyroscopic stabilisers into the market with a further four set to follow.

The Smartgyro SG40 and SG80 were both launched at the 2020 Genoa Boat Show last October. The SG40 is intended for boats of 50-60ft weighing up to 35 tonnes, making it a direct competitor for the Seakeeper SK9, while the SG80 is for boats from 60-70ft weighing up to 50 tonnes like the Seakeeper SK16. An SG20 is due to be launched this summer for boats from 43-50ft. Larger and smaller gyros will follow at a later date.

smartgyro-sg40-installation

The stabiliser breaks down into separate parts to fit through small openings

Smartgyro claims that all of its products offer very similar performance to their Seakeeper counterparts in terms of roll reduction, noise and start-up speed but with a number of significant advantages and a lower price.

The first claimed benefit is that their modular construction makes them easier to install in tight spaces, as the main components can be broken down to fit through small access hatches then assembled in situ. Provided the ball-shaped vacuum dome can be squeezed through the gap, the larger base frame will easily pass through in four separate sections.

The second claimed advantage is that they can be completely stripped down and rebuilt on board the boat rather than having to be removed and sent back to the factory when something major needs replacing, such as the flywheel’s main bearings. This is partly because the vacuum-sealed dome is initially filled with air rather than helium allowing the vacuum to be restored quickly and simply on board the boat once the repair has been completed.

smartgyro-sg40-monitor

Smartgyro claims a roll reduction of up to 90% when running at full RPM

Attractive price point

The third claimed difference is that when operating at planing speeds the Smartgyro will automatically lock itself as it turns into a corner, preventing it from trying to resist the boat’s natural angle of heel as it banks through a turn. In fairness to Seakeeper, this can be done manually and on the smaller boats we’ve tested it hasn’t adversely affected the handling anyway.

For many owners, however, it is likely to be the pricing that attracts their attention. Smartgyro’s aim is to undercut Seakeeper’s equivalent products by around 10% – the base price of the SG40 is €65,000 compared to $85,000 for the SK9. Installation costs will of course vary from boat to boat.

We haven’t yet tested any of Smartgyro’s products but closer inspection of the SG40’s specification certainly suggests a similar set of parameters to the Seakeeper SK9. The Smartgyro appears to use a heavier flywheel (total unit weight 650kg versus the SK9’s 550kg) which spins at a slightly slower rate (7,500rpm vs 9,000rpm) to generate a similar angular momentum (9,100Nms vs 9,000Nms).

smartgyro-sg80

Smartgyro’s SG80 uses a vacuum sealed flywheel to reduce air resistance and spin faster

This means they both develop a very similar level of anti-roll torque (19,000Nm vs 18,810Nm) so they should provide similar stabilisation.

Smartgyro claims that using a slightly heavier, slower flywheel gives a shorter start up time of 25 minutes vs 38 minutes before it generates meaningful stabilisation, although the total spool up time to maximum revs is an identical 55 minutes.

The downside is that it has a higher electrical draw (4kW vs 3kW on start up, and 1.5-2.5kW vs 1-2kW when running) and the extra weight may have a small effect on the boat’s performance and trim. Both units create an identical sound level of 68-70dbC when running at full revs and have similar service intervals of 1,000 hours/annually.

It remains to be seen whether these on-paper comparisons translate to similar performance out at sea but the emergence of a credible new European competitor using a vacuum-sealed flywheel in this fast growing sector of the stabiliser market can only be a positive thing for boat owners and builders alike.

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Smartgyro SG40 Seakeeper
SK9
Boat size 50-60ft 50-69ft
Boat displacement Up to 35 tonnes Up to 30 tonnes
Max RPM 7,500rpm 9,000rpm
Angular momentum 9,100Nms 9,000Nms
Anti-roll torque 19,000Nm 18,810Nm
Spool-up time to max RPM 55 mins 55 mins
Spool-up time to stabilisation 25 mins 38 mins
Spool-up power 4kW 3kW
Operating power 1.5-2.5kW 1-2kW
Noise output at 1m 68-70dbC 68-70dbC
Dimensions L x W x H mm 860 x 930 x 720 852 x 903 x 708
Weight 650kg 550kg
Price €65,000 $85,000

First published in the July 2021 issue of MBY.


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This article Smartgyro SG40 vs Seakeeper SK9: Boat stabilisers compared appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

Source : Mby More   

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