Aussie who lost legs in New York train accident gets COVID-19

She and her mother both tested negative before leaving the US but while in transit, the 23-year-old complained about not being able to taste her food.

Aussie who lost legs in New York train accident gets COVID-19

A Brisbane woman who lost both her legs in a New York train accident has now tested positive for coronavirus.

Visaya Hoffie, 23, returned to Australia on a 38-hour medivac flight after leaving the US on April 11, where she had been hospitalised since being struck by two trains in January.

She and her mother, Patricia, had taken a test for COVID-19 before leaving Manhattan and tested negative.

But while in transit in Doha, Ms Hoffie complained about not being able to taste her food.

On arrival in Brisbane, she was taken by ambulance to the Princess Alexandra hospital, where she tested positive to the virus, the program reports.

Her mother was put into two weeks of precautionary quarantine at a hotel.

One of the doctors who treated Ms Hoffie at the Bellevue Hospital in New York believes she has a strong chance of beating the coronavirus.

Her symptoms, so far, have been mild.

"In my experience, people who are like that almost always do," Bellevue's chief of micro-surgery, Dr Vishal Thanik, told the ABC.

Visaya Hoffie was only noticed on the subway tracks because of her pink top.

She's already overcome incredible hurdles since tripping and falling onto the tracks at Manhattan's 14th Street station into the path of an oncoming train on January 11.

The train and its seven carriages ran over Ms Hoffie, severing her legs and leaving her with several head wounds and fracturing her C2 vertebrae.

She lay on the tracks for 20 minutes when she was hit by a second train.

"When the first train had rolled across her unconscious body 20 minutes earlier, her black puffy jacket and black jeans had made her invisible to the driver," her mother wrote on Facebook earlier this year.

"The bright pink colour of her top is what alerted the engine driver of the second train to the fact that someone was lying across the track."

Visaya Hoffie tripped and fell onto subway tracks at a New York station.

Both Ms Hoffie's lower legs were amputated and she was put on life support.

It was during her recovery that the Bellevue Hospital started filling up with patients suffering COVID-19, as New York City became the epicentre of America's outbreak.

"The sound of coughing was in the air," Patricia said.

"More and more people were actually walking around the wards with COVID."

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Source : 9 News More   

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Millions to get tested in Wuhan as new cluster emerges

Millions more people in Wuhan to be tested for coronavirus as new cluster emerges.

Millions to get tested in Wuhan as new cluster emerges

Millions of people in Wuhan will be tested for COVID-19 within the coming days, after a new cluster of cases emerged despite a strict 76-day lockdown that was intended to eliminate the virus from the central Chinese city.

Over the weekend, six new cases were reported in the city, the first in 35 consecutive days. None of the new cases were imported from overseas, sparking concern that the infection could still be spreading in the city where the virus is thought to have first emerged.

In response to the outbreak, authorities in Wuhan will conduct city-wide nucleic acid testing over a period of 10 days, according to an emergency notice issued by local authorities and circulated by state run media outlet The Paper.

Nucleic acid tests work by detecting the virus' genetic code, and can be more effective at detecting the infection, particularly in the early stages, than tests which examine a body's immune response, though the latter are easier to conduct.

The ambitious screening drive, described in the report as a "10-day battle," could see up to 11 million people tested -- more than the entire population of Greece.

Wuhan was the first city in the world to enter lockdown and great effort has been expended in an attempt to eliminate the virus.

The city has been gradually returning to normal after that 76-day enforced lockdown lifted on April 8, with residents finally permitted to go outside, though many businesses remain closed.

Despite the ongoing economic pain and trauma, however, Wuhan had been held up as a poster child of China's effective response to the pandemic, emerging "like a phoenix," in the words of one state-backed newspaper.

The re-emergence of the virus has already had ramifications for the local government. State media reported Monday that Zhang Yuxin, chief official of Changqing, the area where the new cases had been detected, was removed from his post "for failures in epidemic prevention and control work."

While no new cases of the virus were reported in Wuhan as of yesterday, any major increase in numbers as a result of the new testing will raise serious questions over the accuracy and transparency of the city's previous figures.

Officials are already facing accusations of covering up the severity of the virus in the earliest stages of the pandemic, and confusion over China's national figures has been created by several shifts in diagnostic and reporting procedures.

Nor is Wuhan the only part of the country where new cases have been detected. The city of Shulan, in Jilin province in the country's far northeast, was put under "wartime control mode" Sunday, after 11 people were confirmed to be infected with the virus.

Elsewhere in Asia, South Korea, previously thought to be largely on top of the virus, has also faced a setback this week, with a cluster of new cases detected in Seoul. The country's president, Moon Jae-in, said Sunday that the fight against coronavirus is "not over until it's over."

For breaking news alerts and livestreams straight to your smartphone sign up to the and set notifications to on at the or  

You can also get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the and the .

Source : 9 News More   

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