Back to business: Shared office spaces tentatively reopen

Serviced office managers across the country have been working flat out to reopen their offices during June, installing facilities to protect clients and help them get back to business. Read more: Back to business: Shared office spaces tentatively reopen

Back to business: Shared office spaces tentatively reopen

Serviced office managers across the country have been working flat out to reopen their offices during June, installing facilities to protect clients and help them get back to business.

Across the network of 5,000 shared office spaces in the UK, the task of being able to reopen safely has been a huge one – requiring careful planning and determination in the face of negative press and Government restrictions.

“I’ve never seen an industry pull together like this in face of such aversity – the office space sector has really pulled the stops out to get workspaces reopened for business – albeit slowly and carefully”, explains Jonathan Ratcliffe from serviced office provider Offices.co.uk

Reopening a shared office space might be one of the most difficult like many public spaces with high footfall. Centres with large open plan shared co-working desks face the biggest challenge – the Government is actively discouraging this type of workspace for now. Centres which are formed from mainly private office suites are obviously an easier option and with only 30% of staff thought to be returning to work over the next few months, keeping distance is much easier when offices are closed off from each other. Locking down communal spaces within an office building restricts the chance of contamination.

With the Government issuing advice to wear face protection on public transport, it is thought that this clear message will help employees feel confident in the transition back to working in a City centre office environment.

The two stages of shared office reopening:

STAGE 1 – June

  • Building access restricted for tenants only
  • One-way systems for tenants accessing and leaving buildings
  • Closing of shared facilities such as kitchens, breakout spaces and sitting areas
  • Closing of meeting rooms, or restrictions for internal use with cleaning between
  • Restricted reception services
  • Cleaning stepped up including daily deep cleans
  • Installation of sanitisers, protective screens, floor markings, disinfectant shoe mats

STAGE 2 – July

  • Access to be open to include visitors, some restrictions may apply
  • External visitors to be allowed access to meeting rooms
  • Reception services resume
  • Café areas to open based on Government guidelines

“Staff across the UK from large City skyscrapers to small regional offices have worked extremely hard to provide protection for staff and clients alike ahead of their reopening schedule. As an industry we are all hoping that by taking baby-steps we can welcome everyone back to the office safely and inspire confidence for the rest of 2020”, concludes Ratcliffe.

Read more:
Back to business: Shared office spaces tentatively reopen

Source : Business Matters More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

British Airways threatens legal action over ‘irrational’ quarantine measures

The government is facing legal action over its decision to quarantine all arrivals into the UK amid warnings that the “irrational” policy will be catastrophic for airlines. Read more: British Airways threatens legal action over ‘irrational’ quarantine measures

British Airways threatens legal action over ‘irrational’ quarantine measures

The government is facing legal action over its decision to quarantine all arrivals into the UK amid warnings that the “irrational” policy will be catastrophic for airlines.

British Airways’ parent company today confirmed that it was consulting lawyers in an attempt to block the policy, which is due to be introduced from Monday.

Willie Walsh, the chief executive of International Airlines Group (IAG), said that it was likely that other airlines would also bring legal challenges against the measures.

He insisted that the quarantine, which is applied to foreign arrivals and Britons returning from overseas, was an “irrational piece of legislation” and had “torpedoed” BA’s attempts to resume flight operations in July. It had hoped to operate 40 per cent of flights next month.

The comments have been made only three days before the policy is due to be introduced for people arriving in the UK by air, ferry and through the Channel tunnel rail link. Under the reforms, all arrivals will be forced to self-isolate for two weeks, with the possibility of £1,000 fines for those who flout the rules. About 40 groups will be exempt, including hauliers and airline crew.

However, the measures have been condemned by backbench MPs, airlines and holiday companies, while scientists have queried their effectiveness. The UK is believed to be the only big country to impose a new quarantine so late in the pandemic and experts have asked whether it will be helpful in controlling a second outbreak of the infection in the UK.

More than 300 travel and hospitality businesses have signed a letter to Priti Patel, the home secretary, opposing the plan, with some warning that they will go bust or be forced to lay off 60 per cent of staff because of the loss of income.

The policy will be reviewed every three weeks and the government has indicated that it will eventually be replaced with more focused “air bridges” that allow quarantine-free travel from low-risk countries.

Countries such as Greece, Portugal, Spain and Turkey are already believed to be in talks with the UK government over the move.

However, Mr Walsh said that airlines were hoping to get the policy quashed — possibly before it is introduced — because of concerns over the way it has been implemented. He said that airlines were not consulted in advance and it would have no bearing on the control of the virus.

Large numbers of airlines, including Ryanair, Easyjet, Jet2, Virgin Atlantic and TUI, are planning to resurrect flight operations from late June and into July. However, it is feared that the quarantine will prevent most people booking to fly in and out of the UK. One study this week suggested that only a fifth of people would risk flying while the measures remain in place.

Speaking to Sky News, Mr Walsh said: “This initiative has in effect torpedoed our opportunity to get flying in July. We think it is irrational, we think it is disproportionate and we are giving consideration to a legal challenge to this legislation. So we are reviewing that with the lawyers later on today.

“I suspect that there are other airlines that are doing so because it is important to point out that there was no consultation with the industry prior to enacting this legislation and we do believe it is an irrational piece of legislation.”

IAG wrote to MPs on Thursday outlining the challenges the company faces and defending its decision to make 12,000 BA staff redundant. The company has faced criticism over the move, which is still subject to consultation, after it accepted tens of millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money through the government’s job retention scheme.

In his letter Mr Walsh said: “There are some who believe the company is exaggerating the scale of the challenge. Nothing could be further from the truth. The situation is unprecedented. Nobody is flying.

“British Airways had hoped to operate about 40 per cent of our scheduled flights in July but this has been torpedoed by the introduction of the 14-day quarantine period for people arriving into the UK. British Airways is not generating any revenues and continues to burn through approximately £20 million of cash a day. The current situation is not sustainable.

“The company has already taken on an additional £800 million of short-term debt to supplement its cash position. That debt must be repaid.”

On Thursday afternoon Ms Patel had an online meeting with airlines to discuss the policy. BA boycotted the meeting amid opposition to the measures.

The home secretary told aviation bosses: “To stop this disease in its tracks we’ve had to make some tough choices, huge sacrifices have already been made, and I know how hard the new measures will be for you all.

“But we’re here because we all share one aim: to keep people safe and get Britain moving again.”

She added: “We have all made sacrifices in recent weeks as part of an extraordinary national effort to beat coronavirus, and while the safety of our people is at risk this must continue.

“The new public health measures at the border are essential to protect the hard-won progress we have made and help prevent a second wave.”

Read more:
British Airways threatens legal action over ‘irrational’ quarantine measures

Source : Business Matters More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.