BAE Systems wins contract to teaches KC-130J plane new tricks

BAE Systems, the weapon’s manufacturer, has won a contract valued at as much as $26 million for modification and installation of electronic countermeasures aboard KC-130J aircraft. KC-130J is one of the U.S. military’s most seasoned aircraft, is battle-tested aerial refueling (AR) tanker which provides the refueling support required by the U.S. Marine Corps for its […]

BAE Systems wins contract to teaches KC-130J plane new tricks

BAE Systems, the weapon’s manufacturer, has won a contract valued at as much as $26 million for modification and installation of electronic countermeasures aboard KC-130J aircraft.

KC-130J is one of the U.S. military’s most seasoned aircraft, is battle-tested aerial refueling (AR) tanker which provides the refueling support required by the U.S. Marine Corps for its aircraft.

The U.S. Navy’s Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s (NAWCAD) Aircraft Prototyping Systems Division has awarded BAE Systems a prime position on a $26.7 million task order to install, integrate, and test the Department of the Navy (DoN) Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) system on KC-130J aerial transport and refueling aircraft. The DoN LAIRCM advanced missile warning system improves aircraft capability and survivability by countering advanced infrared missile system threats.

“We understand how vital the KC-130J is to the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps and the enhanced capability the DoN LAIRCM system brings to the fight,” said Pete Trainer, vice president and general manager of BAE Systems’ Air Force Solutions. “With more than 40 years of experience managing complex aircraft modernization and sustainment programs, we’re excited that NAWCAD has entrusted us to integrate this system onto their aircraft to ensure the safety of the aircrews and protect this vital capability.”

The BAE Systems turnkey solution provides program management, inventory control, engineering support, installation, and system testing of the DoN LAIRCM upgrade. Aircraft maintenance and support activities will also be provided as required. This is the second task order awarded to BAE Systems under the Prototyping and Limited Production indefinite delivery indefinite quantity contract. The DoN LAIRCM installation will be performed on up to 19 KC-130J aircraft over the next five years; the work will take place in Crestview, Florida in partnership with Vertex Aerospace Aircraft Integration & Sustainment (AIS) Division.

“The program office looks forward to working with BAE Systems on the DoN LAIRCM installations,” said CAPT Steven Nassau, program manager for Naval Air Systems Command’s PMA-207. “This competitive award will allow the Marine Corps to move from government depot installation to industry without a gap in services. It is a great reflection on the dedication of the KC-130J Mission Systems Team and the contracts office. It also speaks to the flexibility of both the Navy and industry.”

Source : Aviation Defence More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Why Did Airbus Build The A380 Superjumbo?

Airbus built the world’s biggest commercial passenger aircraft, the Airbus A380. But why was it constructed when other…

Why Did Airbus Build The A380 Superjumbo?

Airbus built the world’s biggest commercial passenger aircraft, the Airbus A380. But why was it constructed when other manufactures, such as rival Boeing, were focusing on smaller planes and didn’t want to follow in Airbus’ footsteps? Let’s explore the business case of the Airbus A380.

The Airbus A380 was built for a different market today. Photo: Getty Images.

The market conditions in the 90s

The story of the A380’s design begins back in the early 90s. Airbus had just completed the A330 and A340 designs and was riding high on a wave of consumer confidence. Looking at the market for inspiration for their next cutting-edge design, Airbus noticed several things:

  • Airport slots at popular hubs cost millions of dollars, and some airports like London Heathrow were so popular that no free landing slots were available.
  • This lack of extra slots meant that airlines could not increase the number of flights into the airport (frequency) to gain market share and thus would need to focus on capacity.
  • These flights were already operating with the biggest commercial aircraft at the time (the Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 777-300), and there was no bigger capacity aircraft on the market to upgrade further.

Airbus saw that hub-to-hub travel was becoming more popular. Airlines like Emirates were starting to focus entirely on the hub model by having a central hub in Dubai and using it to link faraway destinations. They needed a large capacity aircraft that could transport passengers a long distance.

Emirates, Jimmy Fallon, The Today Show
The Airbus A380 would become a crucial part of the Emirates fleet. Photo: Tom Boon – Simple Flying

When it came to flying long-haul, Airbus thought that no one would want to fly so long without a shared space (such as a bar) to patronize. A bigger plane would mean more room to mingle and stretch the legs and would, therefore, be more attractive for long routes.

The economics also made the A380 idea attractive to airlines. The A380 can transport so many passengers at once (853 passengers if configured all-economy), that it offers the lowest fuel burn per seat of any aircraft.

When it came to airline customers, Airbus saw a demand from flag carrier airlines, especially long-haul flag carriers who operated popular routes like London to New York, and London to Sydney. However, at the launch of the project in 2000, only two airlines gave public support to the $15-25 billion project.

Thus Airbus set out to build the next generation of super big aircraft, a ‘superjumbo’ if you will. The rest is history.

Air france airbus a380 getty images
The A380 was very popular with passengers, but was it the right economic choice for airlines? Photo: Getty Images

Was this the right design choice?

Was this aircraft the right choice for Airbus to build? We only need to look at the fact that Airbus has shut down the production line for the A380 due to a lack of popularity. The aircraft was too expensive to operate unless fully loaded, and it was hard to sell so many seats at once. Plus, it could only be used on select routes that had the demand, or could even take the oversized plane!

It is even questionable if a second-hand market even exists for the A380, as leasing agents had already scrapped recently retired units when they were unable to find new customers for the type.

The industry has since moved away from the hub to hub model popularised by Emirates and fueled by the Airbus A380. Passengers still want to fly vast distances, but newer aircraft designs are focusing on skipping the hubs and flying direct to destinations with a smaller passenger load.

The A380 was a fantastic and visionary aircraft but built a little too late. That said, had Airbus made a plane like the A380 today, but with the economics of a smaller Boeing 777 or Airbus A350, then perhaps the A380 would be hailed as a success story.

What do you think? Do you believe the Airbus A380 was a smart move by Airbus? Let us know in the comments.

Source : Simple Flying More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.