Banana Cream Pudding Cookies

Banana Pudding Cookies are soft, chewy, and absolutely scrumptious. With all the banana flavor of a banana cream pie wrapped in a cookie. Pudding creates the moistest, most tender desserts ever! Just try these other pudding-infused delights, Funfetti Cheesecake, Chocolate Chip, and even Chocolate Pudding Pie. Banana Pudding Cookies Recipe I am a lover of…

Banana Cream Pudding Cookies

Banana Pudding Cookies are soft, chewy, and absolutely scrumptious. With all the banana flavor of a banana cream pie wrapped in a cookie.

Pudding creates the moistest, most tender desserts ever! Just try these other pudding-infused delights, Funfetti Cheesecake, Chocolate Chip, and even Chocolate Pudding Pie.

Banana pudding cookies on a wire rack.

Banana Pudding Cookies Recipe

I am a lover of all things banana cream. I simply love bananas! Just try these fan favorites like Banana Bread, Banoffee Pie, and Magnolia Bakery Banana Pudding! So, I had to give these banana pudding cookies a try! The result was fantastic! These cookies have just the right amount of banana ratio and I loved the white chocolate chip chunks throughout. The white chocolate is like having real cream in the cookies. It is so scrumptious. Honestly, I couldn’t stop eating them.

Pudding is the secret ingredient here. It creates a cookie that is moist, tender, and absolutely heavenly. The banana cream pudding creates a rich banana flavor that doesn’t overpower the cookies. The banana pudding cookies are so easy and fun to make, my kids always love to jump in and help. It is a perfect activity for the whole family. Banana pudding cookies allow you to have that iconic flavor without all the work of making a pie. So go ahead make a couple of batches of these, you won’t regret it!

Pudding Cookies Ingredients

Simple and delicious banana pudding cookies! Make sure you buy the instant banana cream pudding not cook and serve pudding. Cooked pudding will not give the same impeccable results. You are going to love how moist and tender these banana pudding cookies are! For all ingredient measurements see the recipe card below.

  • Unsalted butter softened: Butter soft and but not melted will create the perfect texture. Make sure your butter is not melted.
  • Brown sugar: Brown sugar adds moisture and flavor.
  • Granulated sugar: White sugar creates the sweetness that makes these pudding cookies great.
  • Banana cream instant pudding mix: Rmember to make sure you purchase instant pudding and not cooked.
  • Eggs: Room tempertature eggs will mix in better than if they are cold.
  • Vanilla extract: Compliments the banana flavor by mellowing it just a bit.
  • Flour: All purpose flour give the cookies structure.
  • Baking soda: This will help the cookies rise.
  • Salt: Salt balances the sweetness.
  • White chocolate chips: There is something magical that happens with the creamy sweet white chocolate and bananas.

How To Make Banana Cookies with Pudding

These banana pudding cookies cook up just like regular cookies. They are fast and easy! You are going to love how fun these are to make. Make these banana pudding cookies with your family!

  1. Prep: Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat baking mat and set aside.
  2. Mixing Up the Batter: Using a mixer, beat together butter and sugars until creamy. Add in pudding mix, eggs, and vanilla extract. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until just combined. Stir in the white chocolate chips.
  3. Baking: Drop cookie dough by rounded tablespoons onto prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, or until slightly golden around the edges and set. Remove cookies from oven and let cool on baking sheet for two minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and cool completely.
Banana cookies on a wire rack.

Tips For the Best Banana Cream Cookies

It is so easy to make these banana pudding cookies that you will want to make them all the time. The texture of the cookies will keep you coming back for more. Make a double batch so you have enough.

  • Pudding: Do not mix up the pudding before adding it to the mix. the pudding will go in dry. Make sure you use instant pudding, not cook and serve. It has more cornstarch in it and will change the consistency and texture of the cookies.
  • Mix: These cookies will mix perfectly in a kitchen aid, with a hand mixer or even by hand. Just make sure that you do not overmix the cookies.
  • Line: To make the banana pudding cookies cook evenly and come off your pan, line the cookie sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner.
  • Scoop: Use a cookie scoop to ensure cookies that are uniform and bake evenly.

Variations of Easy Pudding Cookies

Once you start making cookies with pudding you may not go back to regular cookies. These banana pudding cookies can be customized to your liking and changed up to lots of different flavors. Let the experimenting begin!

  • Add-ins: White chocolate chips are a perfect combination with the banana flavor. But you can subsititue out the wite for semi-sweet chocolate or even peanut butter chips.
  • Crunch: For a bit more texture to your cookies, add in chopped walnuts, pecans or peanuts. Crushed Nilla Wafers or graham crackers would also make a delicious addition.
  • Pudding: You do not have to use banana pudding, but these will not be banana cream cookies anymore. But try vanilla, chocolate, and butterscotch for a new variation of cookie.

How to Store Pudding Cookies

Make an extra batch of these cookies and freeze them for later. Once the banana cookies have completely cooled, place them in a freezer-safe bag in the freezer for up to 3 months. Extra cookies can be stored in an airtight container for up to two weeks at room temperature.

Banana pudding cookies stacked on top of each other.

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Banana cream pudding cookies

Banana Pudding Cookies are soft, chewy, and absolutely scrumptious. With all the banana flavor of a banana cream pie wrapped in a cookie.
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword banana pudding cookies, pudding cookies
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 24 Cookies
Calories 246kcal
Author Alyssa Rivers

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter softened
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3.4 ounce package banana cream instant pudding mix
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups white chocolate chips

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat baking mat and set it to the side.
  • Using a mixer, beat together butter and sugars until creamy. Add in pudding mix, eggs, and vanilla extract. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until just combined. Stir in the white chocolate chips.
  • Drop cookie dough by rounded tablespoons onto a prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, or until slightly golden around the edges and set. Remove cookies from the oven and let cool on the baking sheet for two minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and cool completely.

Notes

Updated on July 30, 2021
Originally Posted on April 17, 2013

Nutrition

Calories: 246kcal | Carbohydrates: 30g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Cholesterol: 37mg | Sodium: 141mg | Potassium: 72mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 21g | Vitamin A: 261IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 42mg | Iron: 1mg
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Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Marinated in a fragrant curry paste before tossing in cornflour to make the coating ultra craggy and crunchy as it fries, Ayam Goreng is Malaysia’s answer to Southern Fried Chicken. In the crowded playing field of fried chicken, it’s a hot contender for the world’s best! Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken) Human beings love fried... Get the Recipe The post Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken) appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Marinated in a fragrant curry paste before tossing in cornflour to make the coating ultra craggy and crunchy as it fries, Ayam Goreng is Malaysia’s answer to Southern Fried Chicken. In the crowded playing field of fried chicken, it’s a hot contender for the world’s best!

Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Human beings love fried chicken. It explains why so many cultures have some version of this wickedly delicious food, and every country thinks their version is king.

But why play favourites? I think there is room in this world (and my belly) for all great fried chickens to peacefully coexist. For one, my mother would put my head on a stick if I didn’t make mention of Karaage (Japanese fried chicken). And if you haven’t tried Homemade Southern-style KFC, you haven’t lived. It truly kicks the greasy and soggy fast food stuff to the curb.

Showing the juicy inside of Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Then there are the Malaysians and Indonesians. Their version of the dish is called Ayam Goreng in Malay (literally, “fried chicken”). Or should I say versions – these nations are so bonkers about fried chicken they have not one but at least a dozen different styles! Some battered, some floured, some simply marinated and fried with no coating at all. Some are slathered spicy sambal, others with sauces, others still are served plain to let their crunchy glory shine.

This version I’m sharing today is a Malaysian-style Ayam Goreng. I marinate the chicken in a rich curry paste packed with classic South-East Asian ingredients. Adding a little flour to the mix just before frying then gives you a crispy, salty, craggy crust that’s a total flavour bomb!


Ingredients in Ayam Goreng

Here’s what you need to make the marinade for the Ayam Goreng:

Ingredients in Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

In the recipe video below, I show how to prepare/peel/cut the galangal and lemongrass. So don’t be concerned if you’re new to them. ????


Chicken for Ayam Goreng

I buy bone-in thighs, drumsticks and wings for ease. For a true Malaysian fried chicken experience, cut up your own chicken so you get breast pieces as well, but ensure you keep the skin on and bone in. Cut the breast into 2 pieces through the bone.

Chicken pieces for Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Smaller is better – Thigh pieces that are 200g/7oz or less each are better, to ensure they cook through so that you don’t need to fuss with finishing them in the oven. I’ve cooked 220g/7.7oz bone-in thighs with no problems. If they are large 250g/8.8oz ones then you either need to fry them to a very, very deep golden in the oil OR finish in oven.

Chicken bites: Ayam Goreng works really well as bite-size chicken pieces too. Use boneless thigh fillets, cut into large 4 x 5cm / 1.6 x 2″ pieces. Follow the recipe, except cook for just 3 minutes.

How to make Ayam Goreng

This recipe involves blitzing up a curry paste, marinating the chicken in it to infuse it with (awesome!) flavour, adding cornflour to make a craggy crunchy coating, then frying to golden perfection!

How to make Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)
  1. Toast spices: Toast spices in a small skillet over medium heat (no oil) for 2 minutes or until the spices smell fragrant. The purpose of this step is to bring out the flavour.

    As soon as they are toasted, immediately transfer seeds into Nutribullet, a small food processor OR into a tall jug that fits a stick blender. Don’t leave them sitting around in the skillet – the residual heat will burn those tiny little seeds!

  2. Curry paste: Add remaining Curry Paste ingredients in the Nutribullet (or blitzing appliance of choice).

  3. Blitz until smooth. It doesn’t need to be 100% smooth like when making curry pastes because any chunks get cooked when it fries. But nor do you want big chunks. Aim for just pretty smooth – a bit of graininess when rubbed between your fingers is ok.

  4. Marinate: Pour Curry Paste over chicken in a ziplock bag, toss to coat, then marinate for 24 hours in the fridge, up to 48 hours. Any longer than this doesn’t add any more flavour, and I’d start to be concerned about compromising the freshness of the chicken.

    Bowl vs ziplock bag – I try to reuse ziplock bags whenever possible but it’s not viable in this case because the marinade is greasy and makes the bag smell. While a bowl will work, it doesn’t quite have the same marinating effect because it doesn’t envelope the curry paste all around the chicken in the same way.

  5. Cornflour / cornstarch – Next, we toss the chicken in cornflour / cornstarch. It mixes into the marinade paste to make it thicker and stick to the chicken which fries up into a delicious craggy crust.

    Cornflour works better than wheat flour because it fries up crisper. A little fried food trivia for your day!

  6. Fry in oil preheated to 180°C/350°F for 8 minutes (wings for 5 minutes), or until deep golden brown and internal temperature at thickest part is 75°C / 167°F.

    I use vegetable or canola oil for frying. But any neutral oil will work fine here, even a light olive oil.

    For the frying vessel, I like to use my heavy-based cast iron pot (Dutch oven) which retains and distributes heat evenly. I also feel it’s safer because it’s deep and it’s heavy so it’s unlike to move on the stove.

If you’re a bit of fried chicken connoisseur, you’ll notice that Ayam Goreng is quite a bit darker in colour than Southern Fried Chicken. This is because of the curry marinade, that has become part of the crust. Those words should really make your knees weak. And lordy, the smell of this chicken!!! *She feels faint at the memory*

Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken) fresh out of the fryer

Pile of Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

I sprinkled these with a little garnish of crispy and salty garlic with chilli and green onions just for a little colour and even more flavour. It’s not traditional – in fact, it’s something I borrowed from Chinese salt and pepper squid! ???? So it’s 100% optional.


What to serve with Malaysian Fried Chicken

I confess my Malaysian recipe collection is somewhat wanting. But being a melting pot culture with a large Chinese population, pretty much any Chinese dish will be right at home alongside Ayam Goreng.

Serve it with a side of Fried Rice (or even more authentically, Coconut Rice! Also see the astonishingly popular Baked Fried Rice from earlier this week) and a fresh Asian Leafy Salad or Asian Slaw. These Sesame Noodles which are served at room temperature would also go very well, as would this Lettuce with Sesame Dressing (honestly, I could eat a whole head of iceberg lettuce with this dressing!).

Enjoy! – Nagi x

PS. In case you’re wondering, you absolutely do NOT need a dipping sauce for this fried chicken! It’s flavoured right through to the bone, and the crust is extremely well seasoned.


Watch how to make it

Freshly cooked Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)
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Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken)

Recipe video above. Marinated in a curry paste made with lemongrass, garlic and spices then tossed in cornflour to make the coating ultra craggy and crunchy, Ayam Goreng is Malaysia's answer to Southern Fried Chicken. Hot contender for the world's bestfried chicken!
Spiciness: Very mild. Feel free to dial it up by adding more chilli powder!
Course Mains
Cuisine Asian, Malaysian, South East Asian
Keyword Ayam Goreng, Malaysian Fried Chicken
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Marinating 1 day
Total Time 1 day 40 minutes
Servings 4
Author Nagi

Ingredients

  • 1.25 kg / 2.5 lb chichen thighs ad drumsticks, bone in skin on (I use 4 thighs, 3 drumsticks, Note 1)

Toasted spices:

  • 2 tsp coriander seeds
  • 2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds

Ayam Goreng Curry Paste:

  • 3 garlic cloves , roughly chopped
  • 1 tbsp ginger , roughly chopped
  • 1 tbsp galangal , roughly chopped (Note 2)
  • 1 1/2 tsp curry powder (any type fine, mild or spicy – your choice)
  • 1 lemongrass , white part only roughly chopped (Note 3)
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 small eshalots (French onions, US: shallots), peeled and roughly chopped (Note 4)
  • 1 1/2 tsp cooking/kosher salt (or 1 tsp table salt)
  • 1/2 tsp chilli powder , adjust to taste (pure chilli, not US chili powder)
  • 2 tsp brown sugar
  • 7 tbsp coconut milk (full fat best!)

Cooking:

  • 1/2 cup cornflour / cornstarch
  • 1.75 litres / quarts vegetable or canola oil

Garnish (optional):

  • 1 tbsp garlic ,minced (not too small, else it burns)
  • 1 tbsp large red chilli (cayenne pepper), deseeded and minced
  • 1 tbsp green onion , minced
  • Pinch of salt
  • Coriander/cilantro leaves

Instructions

  • Toast spices: Toast spices in a small skillet over medium heat (no oil) for 2 minutes or until the spices smell fragrant. Transfer seeds into Nutribullet, small food processor OR into a tall jug that fits a stick blender.
  • Curry paste: Add remaining Curry Paste ingredients and blend until smooth.
  • Marinate: Pour Curry Paste over chicken in a ziplock bag (or bowl, Note 5). Toss to coat, then marinate for 24 hours in the fridge, up to 48 hours.

PREPARE TO COOK (WORK IN SPECIFIED ORDER OF STEPS):

  • Dechill chicken: Remove chicken from fridge 30 minutes prior to cooking and transfer into a bowl (most marinade should be stuck to chicken).
  • Preheat oven to 80°C/175°F and place rack on tray – to keep chicken warm. (Note 6)
  • Cornflour coating: Add cornflour to chicken and toss to coat – it will thicken the paste, this is what makes the craggy coating.
  • Heat oil 180°C/350°F: Pour oil into a wide, heavy based pot to a depth of 6 cm / 2.5 " (my 26cm/10.5" cast iron pot = 1.75L/quarts oil, Note 7). Heat over medium high heat to 180°C/350°F – maintain temp as best you can (Note 8).
  • Fry: Carefully place 3 pieces of chicken in, do not touch for 2 min (to let crust adhere). Oil temperature should drop to 150°C/300°C – increase heat if needed.
  • Fry 8 minutes (75°C / 167°F): Fry for 8 minutes (wings for 5 minutes), or until deep golden brown and internal temperature at thickest part is 75°C / 167°F.
  • Keep warm: Place cooked chicken onto rack and keep warm in oven. Cook remaining chicken.
  • Serve immediately, sprinkled with coriander and garlic-chilli garnish, if using.

GARNISH:

  • Heat 3 tbsp oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and chilli, cook until garlic is starting to go light golden. Then add green onion and cook until garlic is golden. Drain on paper towels, sprinkle with salt. Cool then sprinkle on chicken.

Notes

1. Chicken – I buy bone in thighs, drumsticks and wings for ease. For true Malaysian fried chicken experience, cut up your own chicken so you get breast pieces as well – ensure you keep the skin on and bone in. Cut breast into 2 pieces through the bone.
Smaller is better – thighs 200g/7oz or less is better, to ensure they cook through so you don’t need to worry about fuss with finishing them in the oven. I’ve cooked 220g/7.7oz bone in thighs with no problems. If they get to 250g/8.8oz then you either need to take them to very, very deep golden in the oil OR finish in oven.
CHICKEN BITES: Recipe works really well with bite size chicken too. Use boneless thigh fillets, cut into large 4 x 5cm / 1.6 x 2″ pieces. Follow recipe to marinade and coat, then fry 3 minutes. (Breast works too but take care cooking as it dries out easier).
2. Galangal is an ingredient used in South East Asian cooking that looks like ginger and tastes like ginger but is more citrusy. It’s actually pretty hard to cut so take care when slicing it! Peel it like ginger – either with a sharp edge teaspoon or (carefully!) with a small knife. 
Find it at Asian stores, and in some large grocery stores in Australia (Harris Farms and some Woolworths sell it).
Sub: Use the same amount of ginger + the zest of 1 lime (or lemon).
3. Lemongrass – To prepare, cut and discard the top reedy part off – we only want the bottom 10 – 12cm / 4 – 5″. Peel the reedy green shell to reveal the softer white part on the bottom half of the lemongrass.
Sub: 1 tbsp lemongrass paste.
4. Eschalots – Also known as French onions, and are called “shallots” in the US. They look like baby onions, but have purple-skinned flesh, are finer and sweeter. Not to be confused with what some people in Australia call “shallots” ie the long green onions.
They vary drastically in size! We want to use 2 x small(ish) ones, around 2/3 cup in total once chopped.
5. Bowl will work too, but ziplock bags work better because it works better to keep the marinade coated on the chicken.
6. Keeping chicken warm – this is the temp at which chicken will stay warm, keep the coating crispy but will not continue to cook the chicken inside. Rack required to ensure underside of chicken stays super crispy.
7. Frying vessel – I feel safe using a heavy cast iron pot because it’s heavy so it won’t move. For most oil efficiency, use a wok – shape means you will use about 30% less oil with same surface area for frying. If you have a deep fryer, I salute you!
8. Oil temperature – use a thermometer or surface scanner thermometer. If you don’t have one, test by throwing in a lump of breading – should sizzle straight away but not burn quickly. OR stick a bamboo chopstick in and touch the base of the pot – if bubbles rise from floor of pot, oil is hot enough.
Cook time will vary based on factors like chicken size, pot heat retention, stability of stove etc. Best to use thermometer to check internal temperature, I have a Thermapen. The cook times provided in the recipe are for the chicken weights specified and heat oil temps provided, assuming a cast iron pot is used. Also use crust colour as a guide – it should be deep golden (darker than Southern Fried Chicken).
9. Cooking order – thighs and drumsticks cook in the same time, cook together first. Then wings, then (if using breast) do breast last. Reason: dark meat stays juicier in warmed oven, and breast cooks faster.

Life of Dozer

Dozer, these are called lobsters and you will never know what they taste like.

(Oh wait, that’s a total lie! There was one time…or two… ????)

PS In case you are wondering, no, a whole tray of fresh lobsters isn’t an everyday cooking event in my world! It just so happens that I have a local friend who is a diver who keeps catching crays! These were all caught at local beaches (Mona Vale, Newport and Bungan Beach).

The post Ayam Goreng (Malaysian Fried Chicken) appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

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