Bill Gates Adds Pharma 'Fact' Checkers to Microsoft Products

NewsGuard, which bills itself at "the internet trust tool," is among the latest technology tools claiming to rate information as reliable or fake news, supplying you with a color-coded rating system next to Google and Bing searches, as well as on articles displayed on social media. If you rely on NewsGuard's ratings, you may decide to entirely skip by those with a low "red" rating in favor of the "more trustworthy" green-rated articles — and therein lies the problem. NewsGuard is in itself fraught with conflicts of interest, as it's largely funded by Publicis, a global communications giant that's partnered with Big Pharma, such that it may be viewed more as a censorship tool than an internet watchdog. Now, NewsGuard has expanded its partnership with Microsoft, co-founded by Bill Gates, which will provide all users of Microsoft Edge browser free access to its questionable ratings, among other services. NewsGuard Expands Partnership With Microsoft Under Microsoft's NewsGuard expansion, people who use Microsoft Edge's desktop and mobile browser will have free access to NewsGuard's ratings, which otherwise must be purchased via a $2.95 monthly subscription fee. Microsoft's Bing search engine will also have NewsGuard ratings in real-time, while all other Microsoft departments will also be able to use NewsGuard ratings in their products and services.1 "Projects already underway include the company's Defending Democracy Program and teams within Microsoft Research who are working on misinformation, disinformation and health care hoaxes," according to a NewsGuard press release.2 Also under the agreement is Microsoft's continued sponsorship of NewsGuard's news literacy program, which is a "unique media literacy teaching tool that guides citizens through the overwhelming landscape of online news and information."3 More than 700 public libraries from Los Angeles to London, serving more than 7 million patrons, currently use NewsGuard. The news literacy program exists in the U.S., Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy, and with the expanded partnership it's expected to roll out in Australia, Canada and other countries in 2020.4 With the news literacy program, librarians will even provide instructions to patrons on how to install the NewsGuard extension on their personal computers, tablets and cellphones. Once you've installed the NewsGuard browser plugin on your computer or cellphone, the NewsGuard icon rating will appear on all Google and Bing searches and on articles featured in your social media news feeds. The NewsGuard ratings are meant to influence readers, instructing them to disregard content with cautionary colors and cautions — but NewsGuard's ratings are highly questionable, considering its primary backer, Publicis, is an advertising and data firm that's been involved in advertising and marketing pharmaceutical products, cigarettes and unhealthy junk food to kids. For instance, Leo Burnett, the ad company famous for creating the Marlboro man ad campaigns that made Marlboro the best-selling cigarette in the world and led to the nicotine addiction of millions, many of whom died from smoking, is a part of Publicis.5,6 NewsGuard co-CEO Gordon Crovitz stated in a press release, "We are delighted to be able to expand our relationship with Microsoft, which is a leader among companies in taking steps to address the unforeseen, unintended consequences of new technologies … The internet has empowered people around the world with unprecedented access to information, but the internet has also made it easier than ever for misinformation to spread, including health care hoaxes about COVID-19."7 Unfortunately, what's less widely publicized is the widespread deception that can occur when a conflicted start-up company is allowed to dictate what's truth and what's not. Publicis Acquires Big Data Collection Company Epsilon Publicis was the lead investor among a group of 18 that helped make NewsGuard a reality. As a giant global communications group, Publicis has divisions that brand imaging, design of digital business platforms, media relations and health care. Publicis Groupe's health subsidiary, Publicis Health, names Merck, Abbot, Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, Celgene, Sanofi, Johnson & Johnson and other Big Pharma giants as clients, which gives you an idea of where its loyalties lie.8 In early 2020, drug giant GlaxoSmithKline awarded Publicis Media a healthy piece of business, and the communications group responded by creating a custom platformGSK to run the drug giant's media business; platformGSK in turn added Pfizer Consumer Healthcare to its portfolio, making the total venture worth $1.5 billion. Publicis also handles other Big Pharma media accounts, including Novartis'. In August 2019, Publicis created NovartisONE2 to manage the pharma giant's global media account worth $600 million.9 In April 2019, Publicis also announced that it would acquire marketing services company Epsilon in a $4.4 billion dea

Bill Gates Adds Pharma 'Fact' Checkers to Microsoft Products

NewsGuard, which bills itself at "the internet trust tool," is among the latest technology tools claiming to rate information as reliable or fake news, supplying you with a color-coded rating system next to Google and Bing searches, as well as on articles displayed on social media.

If you rely on NewsGuard's ratings, you may decide to entirely skip by those with a low "red" rating in favor of the "more trustworthy" green-rated articles — and therein lies the problem. NewsGuard is in itself fraught with conflicts of interest, as it's largely funded by Publicis, a global communications giant that's partnered with Big Pharma, such that it may be viewed more as a censorship tool than an internet watchdog.

Now, NewsGuard has expanded its partnership with Microsoft, co-founded by Bill Gates, which will provide all users of Microsoft Edge browser free access to its questionable ratings, among other services.

NewsGuard Expands Partnership With Microsoft

Under Microsoft's NewsGuard expansion, people who use Microsoft Edge's desktop and mobile browser will have free access to NewsGuard's ratings, which otherwise must be purchased via a $2.95 monthly subscription fee. Microsoft's Bing search engine will also have NewsGuard ratings in real-time, while all other Microsoft departments will also be able to use NewsGuard ratings in their products and services.1

"Projects already underway include the company's Defending Democracy Program and teams within Microsoft Research who are working on misinformation, disinformation and health care hoaxes," according to a NewsGuard press release.2

Also under the agreement is Microsoft's continued sponsorship of NewsGuard's news literacy program, which is a "unique media literacy teaching tool that guides citizens through the overwhelming landscape of online news and information."3 More than 700 public libraries from Los Angeles to London, serving more than 7 million patrons, currently use NewsGuard.

The news literacy program exists in the U.S., Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy, and with the expanded partnership it's expected to roll out in Australia, Canada and other countries in 2020.4

With the news literacy program, librarians will even provide instructions to patrons on how to install the NewsGuard extension on their personal computers, tablets and cellphones. Once you've installed the NewsGuard browser plugin on your computer or cellphone, the NewsGuard icon rating will appear on all Google and Bing searches and on articles featured in your social media news feeds.

The NewsGuard ratings are meant to influence readers, instructing them to disregard content with cautionary colors and cautions — but NewsGuard's ratings are highly questionable, considering its primary backer, Publicis, is an advertising and data firm that's been involved in advertising and marketing pharmaceutical products, cigarettes and unhealthy junk food to kids.

For instance, Leo Burnett, the ad company famous for creating the Marlboro man ad campaigns that made Marlboro the best-selling cigarette in the world and led to the nicotine addiction of millions, many of whom died from smoking, is a part of Publicis.5,6

NewsGuard co-CEO Gordon Crovitz stated in a press release, "We are delighted to be able to expand our relationship with Microsoft, which is a leader among companies in taking steps to address the unforeseen, unintended consequences of new technologies …

The internet has empowered people around the world with unprecedented access to information, but the internet has also made it easier than ever for misinformation to spread, including health care hoaxes about COVID-19."7

Unfortunately, what's less widely publicized is the widespread deception that can occur when a conflicted start-up company is allowed to dictate what's truth and what's not.

Publicis Acquires Big Data Collection Company Epsilon

Publicis was the lead investor among a group of 18 that helped make NewsGuard a reality. As a giant global communications group, Publicis has divisions that brand imaging, design of digital business platforms, media relations and health care.

Publicis Groupe's health subsidiary, Publicis Health, names Merck, Abbot, Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, Celgene, Sanofi, Johnson & Johnson and other Big Pharma giants as clients, which gives you an idea of where its loyalties lie.8

In early 2020, drug giant GlaxoSmithKline awarded Publicis Media a healthy piece of business, and the communications group responded by creating a custom platformGSK to run the drug giant's media business; platformGSK in turn added Pfizer Consumer Healthcare to its portfolio, making the total venture worth $1.5 billion.

Publicis also handles other Big Pharma media accounts, including Novartis'. In August 2019, Publicis created NovartisONE2 to manage the pharma giant's global media account worth $600 million.9

In April 2019, Publicis also announced that it would acquire marketing services company Epsilon in a $4.4 billion deal.10 Epsilon made headlines in 2011 after a massive data breach, but is far from a household name, despite its strong presence in the marketing world. What is Epsilon? CNET explained:11

"In addition to offering e-mail marketing services and managing customer e-mail databases for clients, Epsilon monitors social networking and other sites to see what people are saying about a company, advises on markets to target, helps develop and maintain customer loyalty programs, and offers Abacus, 'the world's largest cooperative database with over 8.6 billion consumer transactions and 4.8 billion business transactions' used for creating lists of prospective customers.

The different data Epsilon sells includes age, profession, residence, ethnic information and political affiliation …"

Digiday further described Epsilon as "a smorgasbord of data given it has more than 250 million U.S. consumers in its database and sends over 71 billion personalized emails each year."12 Epsilon was also an early adopter of Amazon Alexa, integrating public Alexa data with its own consumer information.13 Until the acquisition — the second largest deal in advertising history — Publicis lacked a major data marketing arm, but now, as Adweek put it, is "firmly in the data business."14

In addition to owning NewsGuard, Publicis has made deals with other tech companies, including a $500 million, multiyear ad partnership with Facebook in 2014. "Under the terms, Publicis' agencies and their clients — which include powerful brands like Procter & Gamble, Walmart, Bank of America, McDonald's and Coca-Cola — will receive discounted rates on a range of Facebook products as well as access to Facebook's user data and engineers," according to Entrepreneur.15

In 2013, Publicis also inked a $100 million deal with Google and agreed to purchase millions of dollars in YouTube ads in the next year.16 If NewsGuard continues, it's very likely Google, Facebook, Twitter and other platforms will use its ratings to lower the visibility of content — making nonconformist views disappear entirely.

NewsGuard Ignores Key Data, Censors Truthful News

Once installed on your browser, NewsGuard assigns a color coded "Nutrition Label" to sites, rating them green or red in a process they said would be "completely transparent and accountable."17 The nine criteria NewsGuard is using to "protect" you from fake news include:18

Does not repeatedly publish false content (22 points)

Gathers and presents information responsibly (18 points)

Regularly corrects or clarifies errors (12.5 points)

Handles the difference between news and opinion responsibly (12.5 points)

Avoids deceptive headlines (10 points)

Website discloses ownership and financing (7.5 points)

Clearly labels advertising (7.5 points)

Reveals who's in charge, including possible conflicts of interest (5 points)

The site provides the names of content creators, along with either contact or biographical information (5 points)

A score lower than 60 points gets a red rating, while higher scores get more favorable results, which is intended to provide readers with a "signal if a website is trying to get it right or instead has a hidden agenda or knowingly publishes falsehoods or propaganda."19 However, NewsGuard's ratings can't be taken at face value.

Recently, NewsGuard announced that my site has been classified as fake news because we have reported the SARS-CoV-2 virus as potentially having been leaked from the biosafety level 4 (BSL4) laboratory in Wuhan City, China, the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak.

According to NewsGuard, "There is no evidence that the Wuhan Institute of Virology was the source of the outbreak, and genomic evidence has found that the virus is 96% identical at the whole-genome level to a bat coronavirus."20 But NewsGuard's position is in direct conflict with published scientific evidence suggesting this virus was created in a lab and not zoonotically transmitted.

Since my February 4, 2020, article, I've become increasingly convinced — through reviewing the scientific literature that NewsGuard ignores or is unaware of — that SARS-CoV-2 may in fact be a synthetic virus, likely created and released (inadvertently or not) from one or more laboratories that worked on weaponizing SARS and bat coronaviruses.

Interestingly, an April 2020 report by CNN reveals China's censorship of articles mentioning the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 may have leaked from the Wuhan BSL4 facility appears to come from China,21 which means, by essentially also censoring such articles, NewsGuard is functionally protecting Chinese interests and inhibiting scientific inquiry.

Overall, it appears NewsGuard is just another big business aimed at keeping the chemical, drug and food industries, as well as mainstream media, intact by discrediting and eliminating unwanted competition, including yours truly and many others who empower you with information that helps you take control of your health.

Fighting Back Against Fake 'Fact Checkers'

NewsGuard is backed by the Publicis Groupe, which has been manipulating what people think about commercial products for nearly a century.22 You don't need this thought police, advertising front group helping you sort through fake news and telling you what's sound science and what's not.

There are a number of ways to fight back, including choosing browsers and search engines that do not automatically contain NewsGuard ratings. In addition, if your local library is using NewsGuard, you can start a campaign to get it removed, while letting others know that NewsGuard is owned by a pharmaceutical public relations/data firm and is engaged in censoring truthful news and scientific freedom.

Source : Mercola More   

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Will the World Become a Police State?

COVID-19 has sparked fear and panic across the world. Every day, the news is reporting the number of individuals who have likely died from the infection. True to the need to report negative news, they are talking about the thousands who have died, but not the hundreds of thousands who have survived the infection. The virus is virulent and indeed killing people. But there are far, far more who survive it with minor to moderate symptoms and don't require hospitalization or supportive care. In an effort to "flatten the curve," or reduce the number who get infected in a short period of time, many countries have created quarantine rules, shelter-in-place edicts and social distancing recommendations. State governors across the U.S. have declared a state of emergency, which gives them additional powers under state law. According to the National Governors Association, state governors usually1 "are responsible for implementing state laws and overseeing the operation of the state executive branch." The declaration of a state of emergency opens the door for a number of different actions and added authority unique to each state.2 According to public health experts from The Ohio State University:3 "Before getting federal assistance, the governor must declare a state of emergency and begin to follow the state's emergency plan, a provision which emphasizes that the state is the primary authority in the disaster. That is important because emergency powers not only allow state governments to 'provide for' populations, but also 'decide for' individuals in ways that might limit their rights. The idea is that sticking to normal legislative processes and legal standards takes time – and that during a crisis delays could cost lives. In an outbreak, such limits on individual rights involve travel restrictions, social distancing measures and isolation and quarantine. In the case of COVID-19, the Department of Health and Human Services, using the federal Public Health Services Act, invoked federal powers to prevent 'cascading public health, economic, national security and societal consequences.' In addition to this, federal authority empowers the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to examine and quarantine anyone entering the U.S. or traveling across state lines." Police Following Rules With Unreasonable Force Although changes may have helped reduce the initial spread of the virus, how some are implementing the rules look more like the dawn of martial law. This is ironic, considering we are a country that proudly proclaims itself to be the "land of the free and the home of the brave."  For example, Twitter user CJ Pearson4 posted a video on May 14, 2020, showing at least six police officers in New York City physically taking down one small mother. The video is disturbing and clearly shows her exiting the subway station with a mask around her neck and her young child in tow. The officers surrounded her and forced her back up the stairs into the subway station. At one point they grabbed her and three forced her to the ground with her face against the floor. One officer held her young child within feet of her mother being taken to the floor. Four officers surrounded the woman while attempting to put on a pair of handcuffs as she's lying on the ground. She squirmed and continued to yell at the officers to leave her alone and to get off her. As they escort her from the station, a bystander yelled to the officers to take her child with her. The video was retweeted 14,300 times. One person commented, "Wow. This is scary! Reminds me of the videos in Wuhan of cops dragging people out of their homes. I thought we were better than this." Another tweeted, "As a NYC Realtor, I can't physically show a property because #Coronavirus. But #NYPD puts her face down on dirty @MTA floor while others touch her child with dirty gloves? That's OK?" This isn't the first video coming out of New York and not the only city reeling under the enforcement of regulations, rules or statements that citizens must practice social distancing and wear a mask. A video circulated showing an off-duty officer in Alabama who was caught on camera body slamming a shopper to the floor at Walmart.5 The person walked into the store and refused to wear a mask. At the time, Walmart was simply encouraging their customers to wear them, but they weren't required.6 She became irritated when an employee asked her to put on a face covering. When she refused to leave, an off-duty officer who was working for Walmart at the time tried to detain her. As shown in the video, she pushed away as he tried to handcuff her. At this point he grabbed her left leg out from under her and flipped her to the floor. Sergeant Rod Mauldin later said the officer felt he needed to gain control of the woman because of "other threat factors in the store." The threats were not detailed, and the video shows only a second woman standing aside and yelling at the of

Will the World Become a Police State?

COVID-19 has sparked fear and panic across the world. Every day, the news is reporting the number of individuals who have likely died from the infection. True to the need to report negative news, they are talking about the thousands who have died, but not the hundreds of thousands who have survived the infection.

The virus is virulent and indeed killing people. But there are far, far more who survive it with minor to moderate symptoms and don't require hospitalization or supportive care. In an effort to "flatten the curve," or reduce the number who get infected in a short period of time, many countries have created quarantine rules, shelter-in-place edicts and social distancing recommendations.

State governors across the U.S. have declared a state of emergency, which gives them additional powers under state law. According to the National Governors Association, state governors usually1 "are responsible for implementing state laws and overseeing the operation of the state executive branch."

The declaration of a state of emergency opens the door for a number of different actions and added authority unique to each state.2 According to public health experts from The Ohio State University:3

"Before getting federal assistance, the governor must declare a state of emergency and begin to follow the state's emergency plan, a provision which emphasizes that the state is the primary authority in the disaster. That is important because emergency powers not only allow state governments to 'provide for' populations, but also 'decide for' individuals in ways that might limit their rights.

The idea is that sticking to normal legislative processes and legal standards takes time – and that during a crisis delays could cost lives. In an outbreak, such limits on individual rights involve travel restrictions, social distancing measures and isolation and quarantine.

In the case of COVID-19, the Department of Health and Human Services, using the federal Public Health Services Act, invoked federal powers to prevent 'cascading public health, economic, national security and societal consequences.' In addition to this, federal authority empowers the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to examine and quarantine anyone entering the U.S. or traveling across state lines."

Police Following Rules With Unreasonable Force

Although changes may have helped reduce the initial spread of the virus, how some are implementing the rules look more like the dawn of martial law. This is ironic, considering we are a country that proudly proclaims itself to be the "land of the free and the home of the brave." 

For example, Twitter user CJ Pearson4 posted a video on May 14, 2020, showing at least six police officers in New York City physically taking down one small mother. The video is disturbing and clearly shows her exiting the subway station with a mask around her neck and her young child in tow.

The officers surrounded her and forced her back up the stairs into the subway station. At one point they grabbed her and three forced her to the ground with her face against the floor. One officer held her young child within feet of her mother being taken to the floor. Four officers surrounded the woman while attempting to put on a pair of handcuffs as she's lying on the ground.

She squirmed and continued to yell at the officers to leave her alone and to get off her. As they escort her from the station, a bystander yelled to the officers to take her child with her. The video was retweeted 14,300 times. One person commented, "Wow. This is scary! Reminds me of the videos in Wuhan of cops dragging people out of their homes. I thought we were better than this."

Another tweeted, "As a NYC Realtor, I can't physically show a property because #Coronavirus. But #NYPD puts her face down on dirty @MTA floor while others touch her child with dirty gloves? That's OK?"

This isn't the first video coming out of New York and not the only city reeling under the enforcement of regulations, rules or statements that citizens must practice social distancing and wear a mask. A video circulated showing an off-duty officer in Alabama who was caught on camera body slamming a shopper to the floor at Walmart.5

The person walked into the store and refused to wear a mask. At the time, Walmart was simply encouraging their customers to wear them, but they weren't required.6 She became irritated when an employee asked her to put on a face covering. When she refused to leave, an off-duty officer who was working for Walmart at the time tried to detain her.

As shown in the video, she pushed away as he tried to handcuff her. At this point he grabbed her left leg out from under her and flipped her to the floor. Sergeant Rod Mauldin later said the officer felt he needed to gain control of the woman because of "other threat factors in the store."

The threats were not detailed, and the video shows only a second woman standing aside and yelling at the officer. As the officer was escorting her out of the store, two of her friends began arguing with him. The video shows him pulling out a canister and appearing to mace them.7

These are two of many incidents that have happened across the U.S. and around the world. While it may be necessary for the police to implement the rules and regulations, it's not necessary to do it with unreasonable force.

Liquor Stores Are Essential as Drive-In Churches Bullied

Some states are taking extreme measures against specific groups. In Greenville, Mississippi, the city government categorized liquor stores as essential. This allows them to provide curbside service to their customers.8 But, churches were not allowed to hold services when those attending stayed in their cars with the windows up.

In other words, liquor was being handed through open car windows to drivers who were not wearing masks, but church goers were bullied by police officers for being parked in the church parking lot with their windows up. Pastor James Hamilton spoke with Fox News reporter Tucker Carlson about the situation he and his churchgoers found themselves in on the Thursday before Easter.9

The parishioners were lined up in the parking lot, in their cars with the windows up. The pastor had also asked the parishioners to park their cars away from each other, a practice not in place at grocery stores or hardware stores. He was preaching from outside the cars when 20 or more police cars arrived to surround the six cars in the parking lot.

Kelly Shackelford from the First Liberty Institute, a civil rights group that came to the aid of the church, commented on the new regulations in Greenville, saying they were targeting "churches in a way that it targets no other groups. Cars in the parking lot are fine. It's only a crime if the cars in the parking lot are in the church parking lot."

He went on to recount how one police officer approached the pastor and told him because of the new local orders in Greenville, his rights were "suspended." However, Shackelford said that individuals' constitutional rights have not been suspended by the new orders. Hamilton shared it was Mayor Errick Simmons who was behind the order.

The Justice Department backed the lawsuit filed by the church and the suit is pending. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear ordered police to take down the license plates of anyone parked in a church lot to enforce an additional 14-day quarantine.10 U.S District Judge Justin Walker wrote a 20-page opinion in which he commented the city must stop:

"… enforcing; attempting to enforce; threatening to enforce; or otherwise requiring compliance with any prohibition on drive-in church services at On Fire.

On Holy Thursday, an American mayor criminalized the communal celebration of Easter. That sentence is one that this Court never expected to see outside the pages of a dystopian novel, or perhaps the pages of The Onion."

Abuse of Power Strips Civil Rights

This video is disturbing but illustrates infractions happening around the world:

Human rights infractions are happening worldwide, and the United Nations' human rights chief has issued a warning to governments that are abusing their power, saying,11 "the rule of law in the name of fighting the novel coronavirus pandemic risk [is] sparking a 'human rights disaster.'"

Emergencies have been declared in 80 countries. The UN has highlighted 15 where infractions are troubling, but the director of field operations said several dozen more could have been added. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet is asking countries to cease violating fundamental human rights. She warned:12

"Emergency powers should not be a weapon governments can wield to quash dissent, control the population, and even perpetuate their time in power. They should be used to cope effectively with the pandemic - nothing more, nothing less."

Tens of thousands of people have been detained and arrested, violating confinement measures to curtail the pandemic. The Philippines was at the top of the list with 120,000 people arrested in 30 days. In South Africa, reports of police using rubber bullets, tear gas and whips were received by the UN. Additional charges against the police included rape, murder, the use of firearms and corruption.

Virus Fuels Potentially Permanent Surveillance Protocols

China, long known for their use of technology to invade the rights of their citizens, has dramatically increased its data collection after the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2. As they pursue gathering more data, in the name of curtailing the pandemic, the government has released a number of new tactics to monitor and track potential cases.

There is much concern that the pandemic has strengthened the country's case for collecting data on their citizens — and that the data harvest will be permanent. In the past months China began using futuristic technology, such as:13

  • Using drones to watch which people are using masks or going indoors
  • Measuring people's temperatures using new facial recognition software
  • Using software to identify individuals based on body and face structure, even under masks
  • Using phone data to check who has been close to a person who tested positive for COVID-19
  • Using police helmets with cameras fitted with facial recognition and thermal software to identify and quarantine people with a fever

Citizens are also being required to download an app that uses information from their Alibaba account to estimate health and risk of contagion; the information is then shared with the police.

Experts fear the data collection will continue after the public health threat is gone. This type of surveillance already exists in the Northwestern region of China where the state feels they are under threat by religious extremism. Maya Wang is a senior researcher at China's Human Rights Watch. She spoke to Business Insider, saying:14

"The use of these systems is taking place without privacy law or surveillance law that effectively protects people's privacy rights, to allow them to challenge such designation or the imposition of quarantine."

Darren Byler is a technology expert who specializes in China's Xinjiang region. He commented on the use of technology to monitor people, warning:15

"Once you have the tools in place, you'd probably continue to use them, and you can expand them and use them for other purposes. From the US context, the PATRIOT Act, Homeland Security, and countering violent extremist programs that the US put in place initially after 9/11 were focused on Muslim Americans, but have now been radically expanded to look at asylum seekers of all types, like people coming across the southern border into the US.

Once these systems are in place, once things are built, once they're designed — you can't put them back in the box, and once political leaders see the utility of them and see that they can extend their power, extend their control, then of course they will continue to use them and use them in new ways."

Source : Mercola More   

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