Bill to make EPC rules mandatory early ‘unlikely to become law’ after stabbing

The Minimum Energy Performance of Buildings Bill, which aimed to advance the government’s energy efficiency commitments, is ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Bill to make EPC rules mandatory early ‘unlikely to become law’ after stabbing | LandlordZONE.

Bill to make EPC rules mandatory early ‘unlikely to become law’ after stabbing

The Minimum Energy Performance of Buildings Bill, which aimed to advance the government’s energy efficiency commitments, is in doubt following the tragic death of David Amess MP.

He was the presentation bill’s main sponsor in the Commons, launching it at the same time as Lord Foster introduced a parallel bill in the House of Lords in July.

It called for all new tenancies to have an energy efficiency performance of at least EPC band C from 2025 and all existing tenancies to reach this by 2028 “where practical, cost-effective and affordable” but currently has no second reading date. The government’s energy white paper had previously set a target of 2030.

A House of Commons spokesman tells LandlordZONE that presentation bills are highly unlikely to become law, but are often a way of drawing attention to a particular issue.

He adds: “It’s possible that another member could sponsor the bill, but nobody has done this yet. No second reading date is scheduled, and there is no realistic prospect of the bill getting debating time as it is too far down the list of business.”

Amess (introduced) introduced the and had campaigned for more accessible fuel for all since then.

During the new bill’s launch he told MPs: “I know that no government enjoys private members’ bills in reality; they always like to promote them themselves – I am not bothered about who takes the glory. Among other things, it would reduce the impact on the environment and make fuel more accessible to all in privately rented properties, social housing, new homes and owner-occupier properties.”

Many landlords believe the government’s ambition to see all rented properties raised to an energy rating of band C or above – even by 2030 – is a ‘pipedream’ unless upgrades are backed with financial and practical support rather than rhetoric. The latest funding announcement for grants to buy heat pumps has been heralded only as a good start.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Bill to make EPC rules mandatory early ‘unlikely to become law’ after stabbing | LandlordZONE.

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Huge selective licensing scheme planned in Brum covering 40% of the city

Birmingham landlords in 25 of the city’s wards could soon have to apply for a licence if ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Huge selective licensing scheme planned in Brum covering 40% of the city | LandlordZONE.

Huge selective licensing scheme planned in Brum covering 40% of the city

Birmingham landlords in 25 of the city’s wards could soon have to apply for a licence if a massive new scheme gets the green light.

The council has launched a consultation to get landlords’ and residents’ views on the plan which, because of its size, would need approval from Housing Minister Michael Gove.

In, Birmingham introduced a city-wide Article 4 direction, meaning that planning approval is required to convert a family house to any size HMO. A licensing scheme currently only exists for its 6,121 HMOs.

Under the proposed selective licensing scheme, all private landlords in the 25 wards that have been identified as having a high proportion of private rented housing and deprivation, would need a licence. 

Exploitation

It aims to provide a level playing field for good landlords and reduce the risk of tenant exploitation, as well as to reduce crime and deprivation.

The council says it recognises the good work of many private sector landlords in providing quality accommodation for their tenants and has pledged to continue working with the PRS to ensure all landlords provide properties to the same standard.

It also wants to understand the difficulties that landlords face and to help them offer long-term sustainable tenancies.

Shabrana Hussain, cabinet member for homes and neighbourhoods, says the scheme will contribute to the council’s aim of introducing more enforcement and licensing within the sector.

She adds: “I would encourage everyone to provide their views on the proposed scheme. It is only through listening to our residents and communities that we can ensure the licensing scheme focuses on what matters to local residents.”

The consultation runs until 3rd January 2022 at 

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Huge selective licensing scheme planned in Brum covering 40% of the city | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

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