BREAKING: HMRC gives landlords more time to comply with new ‘making tax digital’ rules

The government has given landlords and other businesses a further year to prepare for HMRC’s Making Tax ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - BREAKING: HMRC gives landlords more time to comply with new ‘making tax digital’ rules | LandlordZONE.

BREAKING: HMRC gives landlords more time to comply with new ‘making tax digital’ rules

The government has given landlords and other businesses a further year to prepare for HMRC’s Making Tax Digital (MTD) initiative.

MTD was to come in for landlords who fill in self-assessment forms with a business or personal income over £10,000 a year in the tax year beginning April 2023, but this has now been extended by a year.

HMRC says it has made the decision following feedback from property portfolio landlord and other business operators and their representatives about the additional challenges caused by the pandemic.

Forming part of the government’s ambition to become one of the most digitally advanced tax authorities in the world, MTD is the first phase of HMRC’s move towards a ‘modern, digital tax service fit for the 21st century’.

More time

This means affected landlords will now have more time prepare, while the government says the delay gives it more time to assess an ongoing MTD pilot and tweak the system.

Once it does come in, the new rules will require landlords to store details of their affairs digitally and file their tax returns using specialist software on a more regular basis.

Lucy Frazer MP, Financial Secretary to the Treasury (pictured), says: “The digital tax system we are building will be more efficient, make it easier for customers to get tax right, and bring wider benefits in increased productivity.

“But we recognise that, as we emerge from the pandemic, it’s critical that everyone has enough time to prepare for the change, which is why we’re giving people an extra year to do so.”

MTD has not been without controversy. was forced to clarify that the new rules would not make it more expensive for landlords to post their tax returns after the NRLA and its counterpart in Scotland, the SAL, flagged up its concerns about the ‘potential costs and accuracy of returns’.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - BREAKING: HMRC gives landlords more time to comply with new ‘making tax digital’ rules | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

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ANALYSIS: Why leasehold rules mean millions of tenants will never be allowed pets

Pet-loving apartment block tenants are beginning to rail against leasehold rules banning pets in blocks of flats, ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - ANALYSIS: Why leasehold rules mean millions of tenants will never be allowed pets | LandlordZONE.

ANALYSIS: Why leasehold rules mean millions of tenants will never be allowed pets

Pet-loving apartment block tenants are beginning to rail against leasehold rules banning pets in blocks of flats, with at least one case potentially heading for the courts.

LandlordZONE has heard of a pending legal action concerning a leaseholder who bought a pet after moving into a London block; her lease outlined how the management company would usually approve requests, but because she did not officially get permission, the case is now going through mediation. If a solution cannot be found, the leaseholder faces losing her home.

Most leasehold flats, especially those in large blocks, specifically ban pets in the lease and so far, legal battles to overcome this have failed, as have other initiatives and legal attempts to challenge landlords who refuse pets.

David Smith, property solicitor at JMW, says landlords would find it hard to turn down a pet on disability grounds, but that they retain the right to say no for any other reason.

“One recent legal challenge from a tenant who wanted to live with his dog because he said it would benefit his mental health, was thrown out by the court,” Smith tells LandlordZONE.

Communal harmony

Nigel Glen, CEO of the (pictured), suspects the majority of leases forbid pets but says the standard clause aims to try to protect communal harmony.

He tells LandlordZONE: “I don’t believe this is meant to be a killjoy or a way to charge fees for licences – instead I suspect it is a feature of communal living.

“I’m a zoologist by training so animals fascinate me. But not everyone likes pets and people with allergies, phobias or simply easily disturbed have to be taken into consideration.” 

The latest attempt to solve the conundrum of keeping pets is Petscore, a scoring-based platform that lets pet owners build up a profile for their pet to show landlords and letting agents.

It follows Andrew Rosindell’s scuppered private members’ bill to give tenants the right to live with their pets if they proved they were ‘responsible and caring’, while animal charity is pushing for the Tenant Fees Act to be amended to allow landlords to either take additional deposits off tenants seeking to rent with pets or require tenants to take out extra insurance.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - ANALYSIS: Why leasehold rules mean millions of tenants will never be allowed pets | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

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