Brisbane mother avoids jail for assaulting police officer

A Brisbane mother who tried to stop a male cop from helping his partner as she was being strangled until almost unconscious will not serve time behind bars.

Brisbane mother avoids jail for assaulting police officer

A Brisbane mother who tried to stop a male cop from helping his partner as she was being strangled until almost unconscious will not serve time behind bars.

Cori Reremoana King, 32, says she doesn't remember the incident or slapping another officer across the cheek because she was drunk at the time.

But a judge said her behaviour was disgraceful.

The assaults occurred late at night on May 25, 2019 after King and four of her cousins left a hotel.

Two of the men in their group had become aggressive after being refused service because they were drunk.

Police were called, later finding King and her cousins on the street.

During a seven-minute-long attack, the group surrounded a female officer before one of King's cousins grabbed her throat and choked her.

Other people held the officer's arm, leaving her unable to defend herself.

King pulled on the officer's partner when he tried to help his colleague.

She also assaulted another female officer by hitting her in the cheek while being arrested.

The mother-of-one said she was "mortified" by her behaviour when she watched police footage of the incident.

But Brisbane District Court Judge Vicki Loury QC said King showed no remorse and had not apologised to the officers she assaulted.

Descriptions of King in character references were "entirely incongruous" with her behaviour on the night, Judge Loury said.

She said King had only used a small amount of force, but her involvement was significant.

"There was no compassion apparent in your conduct on this night when one of your group was choking a female police officer," Judge Loury told King during sentencing.

King was sentenced in the Brisbane District Court on Thursday to four months in jail, suspended for 18 months, after pleading guilty.

- Reported with AAP

Source : 9 News More   

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Diesel price gap at record high as coronavirus sees global demand plunge

There has been widespread scrutiny of increasing price margins on unleaded petrol amid a coronavirus-induced global price plummet, but new analysis suggests those driving diesel cars are getting an even worse deal.

Diesel price gap at record high as coronavirus sees global demand plunge

There has been widespread scrutiny of increasing price margins on unleaded petrol amid a coronavirus-induced global price plummet, but new analysis suggests those driving diesel cars are getting an even worse deal.

New research published by the NRMA reveals the gap between diesel's wholesale price and prices at the bowser has almost doubled since last year.

The gap between wholesale and retail prices for diesel in 2020 is now 19.6 centres per litre – among the highest figures ever recorded. This is an increase from an average of 11.2 cents per litre last year.

Australia's international benchmark price for diesel fell to almost a quarter of its pre-pandemic value amid global COVID-19 shutdowns and less demand from both industry and commuters.

From a high of $US83.86 a barrel, it plummeted to a low of $US22.92 a barrel, before rising to $US32.94 today.

In contrast, the average retail price of diesel has only fallen 33.8 cents per litre over the same period.

"Australia's economy runs on diesel so when average prices for diesel across Australia are higher than they should be – as has been the case throughout much of 2020 – the result is it costs more to do business and that cost is often passed on to the consumer," NRMA spokesperson Peter Khoury said.

"In addition, around 40 per cent of fuel sold to Australians at the bowser is diesel – it's a popular fuel among drivers. In just the same way that motorists have consistently been over-charged for petrol throughout the coronavirus, we have also been paying more for diesel."

He called on wholesalers to pass on cost savings to Australian businesses and consumers.

"Not nearly enough attention has been paid to the rising gap between wholesale and retail prices for diesel across Australia," he said.

"It's time for diesel prices to fall and fall fast."

Tasmanians are paying the most for their diesel, with an average price of 136.6 cents per litre, followed by 122.2 cents a litre in Darwin and 120.8 cents in Canberra.

Perth (118.6 cents/litre), Brisbane and Melbourne (118.5 cents/litre) follow, with the lowest average prices in Sydney (114.9 cents/litre), and Adelaide (109.4 cents/litre).

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Source : 9 News More   

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