Café de Paris butter – sauce for steak

Café de Paris butter is a flavoured butter for steak that’s infused with an tantalising mix of herbs, spices and savoury condiments. Top sizzling-hot steaks with slices of this classic French compound butter and watch as it melts into an incredible butter sauce that oozes over the meat! Café de Paris butter – sauce for... Get the Recipe The post Café de Paris butter – sauce for steak appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Café de Paris butter – sauce for steak

Café de Paris butter is a flavoured butter for steak that’s infused with an tantalising mix of herbs, spices and savoury condiments. Top sizzling-hot steaks with slices of this classic French compound butter and watch as it melts into an incredible butter sauce that oozes over the meat!

Café de Paris butter – sauce for steak

Despite its name, Café de Paris butter was actually born in Switzerland, at Restaurant Café de Paris in Geneva back in 1941. It is traditionally an emulsified butter sauce that’s poured over steak, and the original secret recipe is still served today at restaurants such the L’Entrecote group’s steakhouses in France, Switzerland and elsewhere.

These days you’ll find versions of Café de Paris sauce more often served instead as convenient, flavoured butter rounds, like this recipe. Either way the fundamentals are a good balance of aromatic herbs, careful spicing and a savoury boost from a secret ingredient: anchovies!

A pat of this butter on a steak with a side of thinly cut fries, and you’ve instantly got a classic steak frites worthy of a swanky French bistro. Its use doesn’t end there either. The flavours also go brilliantly with seafood, poultry and steamed vegetables too!

Cafe de Paris butter for steak, sliced
Close up of fork picking up piece of steak with Cafe de Paris butter on steak

Ingredients in Café de Paris butter

Café de Paris butter is all about great balance! No single flavour should dominate, it should taste of a complex whole.

Ingredients in Cafe de Paris compound butter sauce for steak
  • Butter – Not all butters are created equal! Most butters are like wine – the more you pay, the better the butter.

    For a truly authentic experience, find a French butter (I get mine from a local French deli called Le Petit Marché in Newport, Sydney). Whatever you use, be sure it is unsalted since we’re adding salty incredients already.

  • Anchovies – This is an essential ingredient for a really great, authentic Café de Paris butter. It does not make the butter taste fishy, it just blends in as a background flavour and most importantly, adds seasoning and umami that plain salt cannot do.

    It is what makes this butter GREAT, so don’t skip it!

  • Curry powder – Curry powder is one of the “secret” spices that makes Café de Paris butter so deliciously intriguing. It doesn’t dominate the butter, but it’s definitely there, well balanced with the other flavourings.

    The original recipe probably contains vadouvan, a French curry spice blend with colonial roots. Any curry powder is fine here though because it’s a complimentary rather than primary flavour. I use Keens or Clives of India, both sold at Woolworths, Coles and other large grocery stores in Australia.

  • Paprika – The other spice that adds a lovely warmth to the butter in terms of both flavour and colour.

  • Worcestershire sauce – We’re doubling down on the fish-based umami! This pantry-essential sauce adds even more savoury flavour depth to this butter. There really is no substitute!

  • Lemon – Just a touch of brightness. If you don’t have lemons, vinegar will work fine here because it’s such a small amount (just 1 teaspoon).

  • Dijon mustard – For flavour and a little sharpness. Dijon mustard is traditional (being of French origin!) else any smooth and non-spicy mustard will work fine here.

  • Eschalots – Also known as French onions, and are called “shallots” in the US. They look like baby onions, but have purple-skinned flesh, are finer and sweeter. Not to be confused with what some people in Australia call “shallots” ie the long green onions

  • Tarragon – A common herb used in French cooking with a mild aniseed flavour, a key herb flavouring for an authentic Café de Paris experience!

  • Parsley – This adds colour more than flavour into the butter, so I wouldn’t say it’s absolutely essential with all the other flavourings included in this butter.


How to make Café de Paris butter for steak

To make Café de Paris, it’s as simple as mixing, shaping into a log then refrigerating until firm so it can be sliced.

How to make Cafe de Paris
  1. Mix – Place all the Café de Paris ingredients in a bowl until combined. It might take a bit of effort because we’re mixing water-based ingredients (Worcestershire sauce, lemon) with fat (the butter). Mash / mix / smear as needed to make it happen!

  2. Place on cling wrap – Place the butter on a piece of cling wrap and roughly shape into a 20cm/8″ log.

  3. Roll up in the cling wrap.

  4. Twist ends to tighten the cling wrap around the log. The tighter the ends twist, the firmer and neater the log will become!

  5. Refrigerate – Secure ends as needed to hold the log shape. Usually, the cling wrap holds itself in place well enough to not worry about doing knots, or you can tuck the ends under the log so the weight of the log stops them unravelling. But if it is loosening, just tie the ends tightly.

    Refrigerate for 3 hours until firm.

  6. Slice and serve To use, remove from the fridge and slice while firm and cold. Let it come to room temperature (so it melts easily on hot steak).

    Cook steak to your liking, then place one or two slices of butter on the hot steak so it melts into a sauce. Prepare yourself for a lip smacking steak dinner!

Cafe de Paris butter on steak on a plate, ready to be eaten

The classic French way to serve steak with Cafe de Paris butter is steak frites – a bistro steak with shoestring fries and a simple green salad. Simplicity at its best.

Otherwise, while ordinarily I’d suggest classic steakhouse sides of buttered herb baby potatoes with some warm greens, today I’m going with bread.

Because there ain’t nothing like warm crusty bread to mop a plate clean of butter, right?!? – Nagi x

PS. The bread I linked above is the most popular bread recipe on my website, a famous No Knead Crusty Artisan Bread based on a New York Times recipe. But if you don’t have yeast – or don’t have time to wait for dough to rise – try this No Yeast Loaf instead. For a loaf made without yeast, it is outstandingly convincing!


Watch how to make it

Close up of Cafe de Paris melting on steak
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Café de Paris – Steak butter sauce

Recipe video above. Café de Paris is a butter for steak flavoured with a mix of herbs, spices and savoury condiments. Despite the name, it originates from Switzerland, popularised by a restaurant called "Café de Paris". Now a staple steak sauce around the world (including in Paris!), slices of this compound butter are placed on hot steaks so they melt to form a butter sauce. It's so simple, yet so incredibly good!
Makes enough for 4 to 6 steaks, depending on how much butter you want on your steaks. Keeps for 2 months in the fridge, also excellent over seafood, poultry and hot steamed veg!
Course Main, Sauce
Cuisine French
Keyword butter for steak, Cafe de Paris, compound butter, steak butter, steak sauce
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings 4 – 6 steaks
Calories 196cal
Author Nagi

Ingredients

  • 100g / 7 tbsp unsalted butter , softened
  • 2 tbsp eschalot (small), very finely chopped (Note 1)
  • 1 garlic , finely minced
  • 3 anchovy fillets , finely chopped (Note 2)
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp curry powder (mild, Note 3)
  • 1/2 tsp paprika (plain or sweet, not smoked or spicy)
  • 1 tsp kosher / cooking salt
  • 2 tsp tarragon , finely chopped (Note 4)
  • 2 tsp parsley , finely chopped

Steak:

  • Steaks of choice (Note 5)
  • 1/2 tsp cooking/kosher salt per steak
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper per steak
  • 1 tbsp vegetable or canola oil

Instructions

Café de Paris butter:

  • Place ingredients in a bowl and mix to combine.
  • Place on cling wrap and roughly shape into a 20cm / 8″ log using spatulas or butter knives.
  • Roll up, then twist ends tightly. As you tighten the ends, the butter will shape into a neat, firm log.
  • Tie ends if needed to keep the shape. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until firm.
  • To use – Slice into 0.7cm (1/3") slices, then let them soften to room temperature (so they melt easier). Place on hot steak so it melts.

Cooking Steak:

  • Bring to room temp: Take the steak out of the fridge 30 minutes prior to cooking.
  • Dry: Pat steaks dry with paper towels.
  • Heat skillet: Heat oil in a heavy based skillet over high heat until it is very hot – you should see smoke!
  • Season: Sprinkle each side of the steak generously with salt and pepper, then immediately place in the skillet.
  • Cook steak to taste: For 2cm (3/4") thick steaks, cook the first side for 2 minutes, then turn and cook the other side for 2 minutes (medium rare 52°C/125°F, chart below for other doneness temps).
  • Rest: Transfer steaks to a warm plate, cover loosely with foil and rest for 5 to 10 minutes, then serve.

Notes

1. Eschalots – Also known as French onions, and are called “shallots” in the US. They look like baby onions, but have purple-skinned flesh, are finer and sweeter. Not to be confused with what some people in Australia call “shallots” ie the long green onions.
2. Anchovies – This is an essential ingredient for a really great, authentic Café de Paris. It adds depth of flavour and salt to the butter. It does not make the butter taste fishy, it just blends in as a background flavour. It makes this butter GREAT, don’t skip it!
3. Curry powder – Any curry powder is fine here because it’s a complimentary rather than dominant flavour. I use Keens or Clives of Indian, both sold at Woolworths, Coles and other large grocery stores in Australia.
4. Tarragon – A common soft herb used in French cooking with a mild aniseed flavour.
5. Steaks – Key to cooking steak well is getting a great deep golden crust. To achieve this, you must not crowd the pan. So unless you’re cooking small eye fillet steaks (aka tenderloin steak / filet mignon), don’t cook more than 2 steaks at a time.
Internal temperature cooked steak:
Medium rare is the default doneness restaurants will prepare a steak to (definitely my favourite!).
Internal temperature cooked steak medium rare
6. Nutrition – For butter only, per 25g portion.

Nutrition

Calories: 196cal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 56mg | Sodium: 618mg | Potassium: 100mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 803IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 31mg | Iron: 1mg

Life of Dozer

He was banished outside until I could wash him because he rolled in duck poo while out on a walk. Hard to resist that forlorn face. He’s used to total freedom – coming and going as he pleases! (Confession – one pitiful wail and I ditched work to go outside to bathe him. #sucker)

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Zucchini Falafels

One of my all-time most memorable meals happened in a back alley in Amman – the capital of Jordan. The ‘restaurant’ (I use the term loosely) didn’t have a menu or even a name. But there was a gigantic wok-like pot on a burner out the front. And an old man frying batch after batch […] The post Zucchini Falafels appeared first on Stonesoup.

Zucchini Falafels

One of my all-time most memorable meals happened in a back alley in Amman – the capital of Jordan.

The ‘restaurant’ (I use the term loosely) didn’t have a menu or even a name. But there was a gigantic wok-like pot on a burner out the front. And an old man frying batch after batch of crispy falafels.

We ate them with hummus tucked into pita. With pickled vegetables on the side for a kick of freshness. Yum.

It was the memory of those perfect falafels which inspired this recipe. I wanted something less carby and fresher. And baked not fried because lets face it, large pots of hot oil are scary.

My first attempts using almond meal we good but not quite right – lacking the nubbliness of a good falafel.

And then I had the stroke of genius to use seeds. Partially pulverized in the food processor they are a total winner. Luckily we don’t need to travel to the other side of the world to enjoy them.

Zucchini Falafels
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Zucchini Falafels

Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 3 people

Ingredients

  • 300 g zucchini courgette 1 medium
  • 150 g sunflower seeds or pepitas pumpkin seeds or both
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 egg
  • 200 g hummus
  • 1 bunch flat leaf parsley

Instructions

  • Turn your oven to 250C (480F).
  • Grate the zucchini and place in a medium bowl. Pulse the seeds in the food processor until about half dust / half little chunks. Add to the zucchini with the salt, cumin and egg. Stir to mix well.
  • Line a large rimmed baking sheet with baking paper and drizzle generously with oil. Using a soup spoon, scoop the falafels into balls about golf ball size. Place them on the tray as you go. Drizzle each one with more oil.
  • Pop the falafels in the oven and set your timer for 12 minutes.
  • When the timer goes check that the falafels are deep golden and sizzling. If not give them another few minutes.
  • Serve your hot falafels on a bed of hummus with the parsley on the side. They're also good at room temp if you want to take them for a picnic like we did.

Video


Net Carbs: 22g/serve

Variations & Substitutions for Zucchini Falafels

Keto / ultra low carb / paleo – use my Almond Hummus, Broccoli Hummus or Quick Cauliflower Hummus.

egg-free – you could try a flax egg (1 tablespoon ground flax seeds + 2 tablespoons water) but they may not bind as well.

more substantial (carb lovers) – warm pita bread or tortillas.

more substantial (low carb) – serve with boiled, poached or fried eggs. OR with zucchini tortillas or a handful of roast almonds or walnuts.

different vegetables – anything you can grate will work like carrots, beets, kohlrabi, celeriac and you could use broccoli or cauliflower ‘rice’. I’m also thinking drained and squeezed dry frozen spinach would be good.

different seeds / nuts – you could use hemp seeds or almond meal instead of pulverising the seeds. Or try nuts like walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, macadamias or almonds.

different sauce – also good with babaganoush, Beet ‘Caviar’, Almond Hummus, Broccoli Hummus, Pesto, Tomato Almond Pesto or Amazing Avo Sauce.

more fancy / for entertaining – serve with ‘Best Ever’ Tabbouleh, Reliable Cabbage Salad or this Lime & Tahini Kale Salad. Or try them sprinkled with this Magic Sprinkle.

carnivore – serve with salami or proscuitto.

Waste Avoidance Strategy

zucchini – will keep for 2 weeks or longer in a plastic bag in the fridge. To keep it even longer, cook sliced zucchini in a little butter until just soft then store in an airtight container in the fridge.

sunflower seeds / pepitas (pumpkin seeds) / salt / cumin – keep them in the pantry.

eggs – will keep in the fridge for weeks or use for another meal.

hummus – will keep in the fridge for a few weeks. Can be frozen.

flat leaf parsley – tends to be the most long lasting of the leafy herbs. Should keep for a few weeks in the fridge if wrapped in a plastic bag. For longer periods pop it in the freezer – it will wilt but will still be useable in this dish.

Problem Solving Guide

bland – more salt! A squeeze of lemon can help. OR some hot sauce.

too dry – overcooked falafels. Next time get them out earlier. For now eating with the hummus will help.

no oven – shallow fry in a little oil being sure to let them cook thoroughly on the first side before turning. Be very careful as they are fragile.

no food processor – finely chop the seeds by hand – they’ll be chunky but that’s fine.

sticking to the tray – next time make sure you use baking paper (not foil) to line your tray and be generous with the oil.

Prepare Ahead for Zucchini Falafels

Yes! Just cook as per the recipe but keep the parsley and hummus separately. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for 1-2 weeks or can be frozen. Serve at room temp or pop them in the oven for a few minutes to warm through.

Zucchini-Falafels

More Recipes like Zucchini Falafels

  • Zucchini Pizza
  • Crispy Zucchini Fritters for St Patrick
  • how to make hummus & falafels like a pro [5 ingredients]
  • 16 Tasty Ideas for Zucchini
  • Zucchini Tortillas (Low Carb)

With love,
Jules x

The post Zucchini Falafels appeared first on Stonesoup.

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