Canon Explains EOS R5 Overheating, Why There’s No Fan, and More

Canon sent out a media alert to press this morning addressing the overheating concerns that have come up regarding the new EOS R5 full-frame mirrorless camera. The statement explains why Canon didn’t include a fan, when the camera will overheat, and what you can do to avoid these issues. The statement covers a lot of […]

Canon Explains EOS R5 Overheating, Why There’s No Fan, and More

Canon sent out a media alert to press this morning addressing the overheating concerns that have come up regarding the new EOS R5 full-frame mirrorless camera. The statement explains why Canon didn’t include a fan, when the camera will overheat, and what you can do to avoid these issues.

The statement covers a lot of ground, explaining the steps that Canon took to avoid overheating, why the company chose not to install a fan for active cooling, an explanation of the “Overheat Control” feature, and tips for “reducing heat buildup” when shooting video. They even included a section about the lower-resolution EOS R6.

Canon also published (again) official overheating and recovery times for the EOS R5:

Regarding the omission of any sort of fan—notably included in the Panasonic S1H—Canon writes:

The decision not to install a fan within the body was made in order to maintain the EOS R5’s compact size, lightweight construction and weather resistance.

In terms of tips for avoiding these overheating limits, Canon offers five bullet points of advice:

  • Set Overheat Control function to “ON” (default). When the overheat control function is enabled, the movie size and frame rate are automatically changed while the camera is in standby mode to suppress the rise of the internal temperature
  • Between recordings, it is recommended to turn off the camera
  • Position the camera out of direct sunlight
  • Use an external fan to dissipate heat

Finally, regarding the EOS R6, Canon admits that “at the highest frame rates and resolutions heat is inevitably generated,” but the limits seem to be negligible for standard use. According to Canon’s official statement:

The EOS R6 can record up to the 29 minutes 59 second recording limit in the 5.1K oversampled 4K 60p mode at (23°C / 73°F) before encountering any heat related issues within the camera and up to 40 minutes of 4K at 30p.

You can read the full statement, unedited, below.

There has been a lot of debate about whether the limitations described by Canon can be described as overheating “issues,” or whether it’s all being overblown by critics and those who “want” the EOS R5 and Canon to fail. In the end, we won’t know how serious these issues are until the full reviews begin to come out.

To Canon’s credit, they’re being incredibly transparent about the potential for issues.

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Olympus Brand Name Will Disappear from Camera Gear Next Year: Report

A report published by 43 Rumors sheds a bit more light on what is going to happen to the Olympus brand moving forward, how the news was shared within the company itself, and what photographers who use Olympus gear can expect in the coming years. After announcing plans to sell the camera business to Japan […]

Olympus Brand Name Will Disappear from Camera Gear Next Year: Report

A report published by sheds a bit more light on what is going to happen to the Olympus brand moving forward, how the news was shared within the company itself, and what photographers who use Olympus gear can expect in the coming years.

After announcing plans to sell the camera business to Japan Industrial Partners (JIP), Olympus has stayed pretty quiet about the bombshell announcement. In fact, the company has gone so far as to release a new lens roadmap, reassuring users that there are more new Olympus camera products on the way. But that doesn’t mean changes aren’t coming.

, the 2020 product roadmap is “still valid,” but the Olympus brand name itself won’t appear on cameras for much longer. “Starting from 2021 new products will not have the ‘Olympus’ name [on them],” writes the rumor site. “Cameras will be branded purely as ‘OMD’ or ‘PEN’ and lenses as ‘ZUIKO.'”

Photo by Danny Lines, CC0

Similar to what we saw happen to Sony’s VAIO laptop brand after it was purchased by JIP, current products don’t include the “Sony” brand name—they’re released simply as VAIO.

The good news: OMD cameras and ZUIKO lenses will continue to be released; the bad news: without the weight of the Olympus brand and R&D behind them, the quality of the products might erode over time. For reference, the latest VAIO laptops have received so-so reviews and included some strange design choices… like including a VGA port.

Finally, one other bit of notable info was included in the 43 Rumors report: apparently, nobody outside of Tokyo headquarters knew about the camera business sale until the press release hit. According to the rumor site, “Olympus Europe and North America only learned [about the sale] from the press release.”

Ouch.


Image credits: Header image by Rosie Kerr, CC0

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