CBS 2 Investigators: A Look At The COVID-19 Hot Spots In Chicago’s African American Communities

Auburn Gresham, Chatham and Austin neighborhoods, all identified as hot spots, have also seen increases. A common thread among those who died: where they work.

CBS 2 Investigators: A Look At The COVID-19 Hot Spots In Chicago’s African American Communities

CHICAGO (CBS) — Monday marks 88 days since the coronavirus was first confirmed in Illinois.

And African Americans now represent 57% of all COVID-19 deaths in Chicago. In just the last two-weeks, the number of black victims has tripled.

CBS 2 Investigator Dorothy Tucker first identified five hot spots using maps CBS 2 created. Now, she’s digging deeper into the data and found in the neighborhoods where the victims lived, many have essential jobs that increase their chances of being exposed to the deadly virus.

Look no further than these blue points on the map. These are people who died of coronavirus. Most of them live in Chicago’s black communities, the hot spots for COVID-19 deaths.

When CBS 2 first took a look two weeks ago, five neighborhoods had the worse deaths: South Shore, Englewood, Auburn Gresham, Austin and Chatham. It was bad then. It is worse now.

Englewood is leading the way. The numbers of deaths have jumped from six to 23 as of last Friday. South Shore is almost as bad: seven deaths two weeks ago. By the weekend 22.

Auburn Gresham, Chatham and Austin neighborhoods, all identified as hot spots, have also seen increases. A common thread among those who died: where they work.

“When we consider the types of positions that black Americans hold, many of them are on the front lines in essential roles related to food delivery, groceries work, transportation, delivery,” said epidemiologist Dr. Mercedes Carnethon of Northwestern Medicine.

The data CBS 2 pulled reflects the reality. In Austin, where 19 people died, nearly 11% of those employed work in transportation. That’s nearly 3,500 people. In Englewood, nearly 12% of those employed, or just over 2,000 people, also work transportation jobs. Another 1,200 work in food preparation.

Consider the case of young adult working: A 30 to 40 years old grocery store worker.

“He or she does not have symptoms but they’re talking, they are providing care for younger children, they are providing care for elders. There is no amount of cleaning within a household that can stop the spread through ordinary interactions and discussions,” Carnethon said.

MAP: The Most Covid Deaths In Chicago Happened In These Neighborhoods

Another popular job in those black communities: people who work in health care as kitchen helpers or janitors. All essential workers who can be exposed to the coronavirus every day.

 

Source : CBS Chicago More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Reopening The Economy Could Depend On Faster COVID-19 Testing

CHICAGO (CBS) — As talk turns to a slight re-open of the economy, scientists turn their attention back to a massive short-coming in this country: testing for COVID-19. CBS 2’s Chris Tye reports on how Illinois stacks up in getting it right. The U.S. has improved its numbers, but is still lagging on a global […]

Reopening The Economy Could Depend On Faster COVID-19 Testing

CHICAGO (CBS) — As talk turns to a slight re-open of the economy, scientists turn their attention back to a massive short-coming in this country: testing for COVID-19.

CBS 2’s Chris Tye reports on how Illinois stacks up in getting it right.

The U.S. has improved its numbers, but is still lagging on a global scale CBS 2 dug into the latest number: Illinois is squarely in the middle of all 50 states as far as the number, per capita, getting tested.

Experts said getting that number up, from coast to coast, is nothing less than a moon-shot.

Last week, an emissions testing station in Markham made the switch. On Monday, St. Timothy Church in Gary, Indiana transformed into a COVID-19 test site.

Small steps, not the giant leaps, Dr. Gregg Gonsalves of Yale University said we need.

“We’re being asked to do something more mundane than moonshot. Make 10-20 million more tests,” Gonsalves said.

CBS 2 dug into the tests underway around the globe. Switzerland leads the testing pack, with 25 people tested for every 1,000 residents. In Germany it’s 20. In South Korea it’s 11.

Which is where the U.S. now stands after lagging awhile. The Illinois average also 11 per 1,000. In Indiana it’s nine. And as for positive cases per thousand?

Illinois ranks 11th, Indiana 16th.

“There’s a set of governors, both Republican and Democrats, that want to do the right thing despite what the White House is offering them,” he said.

The nasal swabs, test tubes and PPe used for these drive thru tests simply doesn’t exist in the quantities Dr. Gonsalves wants to see. He said Americaneeds to triple its testing and only the federal government can commission that kind of effort.

“It’s a business proposition.  We have a former executive in charge of our government. He should be able to make tests, make swabs, get them delivered and get them administered and do it in no time but we seem to not be able to do it,” he said.

Those that get the test, and identify the sick fastest, may be first to hopping on the path to a re-opened economy.

Source : CBS Chicago More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.