CFExpress vs XQD: Nikon D6 Buffer Test

If you’ve been wondering what kind of continuous shooting improvement you can expect from CFExpress over XQD, this video tries to answer that question. Put together by JANG HEE LEE, it shows the difference between shooting with CFExpress and XQD on the brand new Nikon D6 DSLR. The video was created as a “buffer test” […]

CFExpress vs XQD: Nikon D6 Buffer Test

If you’ve been wondering what kind of continuous shooting improvement you can expect from CFExpress over XQD, this video tries to answer that question. Put together by JANG HEE LEE, it shows the difference between shooting with CFExpress and XQD on the brand new Nikon D6 DSLR.

The video was created as a “buffer test” for the D6, and it highlights the advantage (or lack there-of) that the new CFExpress format offers over XQD on this particular camera.

To show this, Lee ran several tests, capturing 14-bit RAW photos at 14fps, 14-bit RAW photos at 12fps, and 12-bit RAW photos at 14fps. Each test was run on an XQD and a CFExpress card, and the “result” is displayed in the number of photos taken before the camera started stuttering. For reference, you can see the advertised buffer capacity of the Nikon D6 in this excerpt from the user manual:

It’s not a perfect test by any means. For one: it’s a vanity metric. Most users probably won’t need to fire off more than 105 14-bit uncompressed RAW images in a row without stopping. Even at 14fps, that’s 7.5 seconds worth of photos at full speed without interruption.

Another issue is the lack of lens: every photo was taken with the camera’s body cap on, which might have allowed the card to store the all-black images faster.

Still, it’s interesting to see the difference. Even if it doesn’t necessarily reveal what’s theoretically possible with CFExpress, it might give you a sense of how well Nikon has managed to implement the new technology in their latest DSLR.

(via Nikon Rumors)

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A Rare Photo of Someone Smiling in the 19th Century

Portrait photos from over a century ago rarely show subjects smiling, but this 19th century photo is an exception, and it’s been going viral online for that reason. The photo is found in the National Anthropological Archives maintained by the Smithsonian Institution. The 14.5×6.5-inch photo was captured in 1894, and it shows a Native American […]

A Rare Photo of Someone Smiling in the 19th Century

Portrait photos from over a century ago rarely show subjects smiling, but this 19th century photo is an exception, and it’s been going viral online for that reason.

The photo is found in the National Anthropological Archives maintained by the Smithsonian Institution. The 14.5×6.5-inch photo was captured in 1894, and it shows a Native American girl named O-o-dee of the Kiowa people in the Oklahoma Territory.

It’s believed that the photo was captured by a photographer named George W. Bretz who ran a photo studio in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. An album of Bretz’s photos, which includes this smiling portrait, was sold at auction in 2019 for $43,750.

As the photo is making the rounds on the Web, people have been commenting on how “modern” and “relatable” the smiling makes the picture look.

“Wow, she could totally be an average high school girl dressed up in traditional clothes,” one commenter writes. “Amazing what a smile can do to modernize a picture.”

“A smile brings a whole new level of humanity to old photos,” one writes.

“It’s crazy how much more relatable that makes this picture,” writes another. “If I saw it without context I would have thought it was someone from today who photoshopped it.”

There are different theories and explanations for why subjects rarely smiled in photos prior to the 20th century. In addition to technical limitations — people often had to sit absolutely still for several minutes while photos were being exposed — there were also issues of poor oral hygiene and cultural norms that caused people to wear serious expressions on their faces.


P.S. Here are some of the earliest known photos of people smiling in photos.

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