Chairman’s Note: On-Aircraft PCR Testing Increases Flexibility and Reduces Risk on International Missions

We’ve spent the better part of a year working on this issue to develop a solution to effectively address this. The answer: Certifying the aircraft as a mobile testing lab. We partnered with Cedars Health, an expert in mobile laboratory services, to develop a program in which N-registered aircraft can be certified as a mobile laboratory – i.e., On-Aircraft COVID Testing. The post Chairman’s Note: On-Aircraft PCR Testing Increases Flexibility and Reduces Risk on International Missions appeared first on Universal® Operational Insight Blog.

Chairman’s Note: On-Aircraft PCR Testing Increases Flexibility and Reduces Risk on International Missions

Dear friends and colleagues,

At Universal, we’re always looking at ways to reduce operational challenges and risks for our customers and genuinely make their lives easier. For example, in my own personal travels since the pandemic, one of the biggest challenges has been finding access to reliable and convenient testing.

That’s why I’m excited to talk about a new program that really alleviates the burden of managing COVID testing on international missions – On-Aircraft COVID Testing.

COVID testing isn’t going away.

Since the early days of the pandemic, proof of a negative COVID test has been a standard requirement for entering most countries.

Earlier this year, we briefly saw this requirement begin to go away for the fully vaccinated. However, with the proliferation of the Delta variant, most countries have since reinstated some form of a COVID testing mandate for entry, and it looks like this will continue to be a necessity for international travel for a while.

But it carries challenges and risks for international mission planning.

Trying to manage COVID testing abroad creates severe logistical challenges and risks for business aircraft operators, potentially impacting the success of any international mission. These can include:

  • Scheduling a trip to the hospital or lab into a tight itinerary
  • Lost time and extra costs for a commute
  • If remote technicians are an option, they aren’t always available for your preferred time
  • Physical security risks
  • Health exposure risks
  • Passenger comfort around strangers touching them
  • Data privacy concerns in a foreign country
  • Risk that retesting may be required after false positive or inconclusive result

The solution is on-aircraft COVID testing.

We’ve spent the better part of a year working on this issue to develop a solution to effectively address this. The answer: Certifying the aircraft as a mobile testing lab.

We partnered with Cedars Health, an expert in mobile laboratory services, to develop a program in which N-registered aircraft can be certified as a mobile laboratory – i.e., On-Aircraft COVID Testing.

And it’s working VERY WELL.

We initially piloted the program with a handful of international operators and heard overwhelmingly positive feedback on the whole process. Since then, many operators have joined the program, and they’re telling us the benefits they’re realizing from this solution:

  • Perfect for tight itineraries.
  • Maximizes operational flexibility, especially when dealing with last-minute changes.
  • Easier on your passengers and crew.
  • Provides more privacy, better data security, and better physical safety.
  • Reduces wasted time on the ground.
  • Eliminates extra costs for transportation to/from the lab.
  • Risk Mitigation: A perfect “Plan B” option to always have in your back pocket at a moment’s notice.

How it works.

  • SET UP: Complete a mobile lab certification process for designated crew and aircraft. This involves receiving testing equipment and supplies, completion of virtual training by crew that will be administering the tests.
  • There are options for both PCR and Antigen testing based on the countries you visit and their entry requirements.
  • TESTING: Certified crew will be able to collect samples and run COVID tests onboard the lab-certified aircraft. The process takes about 30 minutes to prep the area, put on the PPE, collect the samples, and run the tests.
  • ANAYLSIS & REPORTING: Data is securely transmitted via HIPAA-compliant web portal to the experts at Cedars Health, who analyze the data and issue the certified lab test result within 15 minutes.
  • TRIP SUPPORT: Universal Trip Support verifies health entry requirements for your planned mission and works with Cedars Health to have their lab team ready and on-call based on your flight schedule.

Accepted globally.

Working through our global network of Universal Aviation FBOs and third-party preferred ground handlers, we’ve validated that this program is now accepted by over 160 countries.

Getting started.

It’s an easy conversion. Ask your Universal Account Manager, your Trip Support Team, or contact us online.

Keep the feedback coming.

We love hearing the success stories that this program has brought to our customers. If you’re already using this and it’s making your life easier, please let me know.

And in the meantime, if there’s anything else we could be doing to make operating in today’s COVID environment easier, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me directly.

Safe travels!

Greg

 

The post Chairman’s Note: On-Aircraft PCR Testing Increases Flexibility and Reduces Risk on International Missions appeared first on Universal® Operational Insight Blog.

Source : Universal Weather More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

The Fall Of The Boeing 747-200

At the time of its launch, the Boeing 747-200 represented the next step for the company’s iconic four-engine…

The Fall Of The Boeing 747-200

At the time of its launch, the Boeing 747-200 represented the next step for the company’s iconic four-engine widebody. It offered operators various improvements on the original 747-100, and ultimately went on to become the second best-selling variant from the family. Despite this, the passing of time and the introduction of newer 747s with further improvements eventually caused the aircraft to lose some of its significance.

The 747-200 typically had more upper deck windows than the original 747-100. Photo: Aldo Bidini via Wikimedia Commons

Why did Boeing build the 747-200?

Boeing developed the 747-200 hot on the heels of its original 747-100 design. According to Modern Airliners, this resulted in the type entering service just a year after the -100, in February 1971. The aim of the 747-200 was to offer airlines a variant of the ‘jumbo jet’ with increased performance capabilities compared to the original for longer-haul flights.

Its range comfortably outranked that of the -100, eventually achieving a figure of 12,150 km (6,560 NM). Meanwhile, the 747-100 could manage just 8,560 km (4,620 NM). The -200 partially owed this to its increased maximum takeoff weight (MTOW), which allowed for a greater fuel load. Its MTOW was 377.8 tons, compared to 333.4 for the 747-100.

Stay informed:  for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

Air France Boeing 747-200M on very low final-approach over Maho Beach with hotels behind
The 747-200 offered various performance advantages over the original 747-100. Photo: Getty Images

Dwindling significance

The 747-200’s improvements over the 747-100 resulted in greater sales figures for the variant. All in all, Boeing produced 393 examples of the type across all versions, including 225 of the standard passenger-carrying 747-200B. Meanwhile, versions of the -100 totaled just 205 sales. As such, the -200 became a staple of long-haul travel in the late 20th century.

Production of the 747-200 eventually ceased in 1991. By this time, two more 747 variants had been introduced, which would signify the beginning of its fall. The first of these was the 747-300. While this didn’t sell particularly well, its stretched upper deck set the trend for future 747s. It was followed by the 747-400, which became the most popular variant.

The 747-200 today

With the newer models offering increased capacity (as well as the convenience of a two-person glass cockpit in the case of the -400), the 747-200 slowly fell out of favor. In fairness, it did fly alongside the newer variants for several years after its production ended. Iran Air finally retired the final passenger-carrying example in May 2016, aged 36 years old.

Rolls-Royce Boeing 747-200
Rolls-Royce’s 747-200 testbed, N787RR. Photo: Alan Wilson via Flickr

Overall, the 747-200’s decline has been such that, according to data from ch-aviation.com, there is just one active example left in the world. This aircraft bears the registration N787RR, and is owned by engine manufacturer Rolls-Royce. The company uses the 41-year old plane as a testbed aircraft. It previously flew for Cathay Pacific and Air Atlanta Icelandic.

Rolls-Royce has owned this aircraft since 2005, when it was already 25 years old. Despite its age, it still takes regular test flights for the company. Data from RadarBox.com shows that the last of these, a four-hour jaunt from Tucson, Arizona, took place on June 4th.

Unfortunately, the situation for the rest of the world’s 747-200s is a rather bleaker affair. Indeed, ch-aviation’s data shows that the vast majority have been scrapped, with just 20 inactive examples in storage. However, some of the stored examples have been preserved at museums (and even as a hostel!), allowing their legacy, even if not airborne, to live on.

Did you ever fly on a Boeing 747-200? If so, where did it take you, and what was the airline in question? Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments!

Source : Simple Flying More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.