Countdown to Launch of Landsat 9

We’re launching Landsat 9 — the ninth in a series of satellite missions from NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that have been collecting images of our planet for almost 50 years. Follow along as we count down to launch!A normal launch countdown starts at 10, but for Landsat 9, we’re jumping in with L-9!There are 9 million images in the USGS/NASA Landsat archive! They’re all available for free, for use by scientists, data managers, and anyone else who’s interested. You can even download them!Landsat 9 won’t be orbiting alone. Working together, Landsat 9 and Landsat 8 will completely image Earth every 8 days! This helps us track changes on the planet’s surface as they happen in near-real-time.Landsat sees all 7 continents! From Antarctic ice to growing cities to changing forests, Landsat measures land — and coastal regions — all around the globe.Working in space is really hard. Landsat 6 never made it to orbit, an important reminder that failures can be opportunities to learn and grow. Shortly after the unsuccessful launch, engineers got to work on Landsat 7, which is still collecting data today — 22 years later.We have 5 decades of Landsat observations, the longest continuous record of Earth’s land surfaces in existence! While building the original Landsat in the 1970s, it would have been hard to imagine that this mission would still be providing crucial data about our planet today.For each color band collected, Landsat 9 will see 4 times the shades of light as the previous Landsat mission! With more than 16,000 different intensities detected, Landsat 9 will be able to see crucial details on our planet’s surface.Our eyes detect 3 colors of light: red, green, and blue — and Landsat does too! But Landsat 9 also detects wavelengths that can be combined to measure things our eyes can’t, like crop stress, coral reef health, fires, and more.There are 2 instruments on Landsat 9! The Operational Land Imager 2 collects light, and works kind of like our eyes — or cameras — to make data-rich images. The Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 measures temperature, helping monitor plant health, fires, and more.The Landsat program is the result of 1 amazing partnership! For more than 50 years, we’ve worked with the U.S. Geological Survey to design, build, launch, and manage Landsat satellites.Two agencies working together makes for the longest continuous record of Earth’s surfaces. Now, let’s launch this satellite!Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!

Countdown to Launch of Landsat 9

We’re launching Landsat 9 — the ninth in a series of satellite missions from NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that have been collecting images of our planet for almost 50 years. Follow along as we count down to launch!

A normal launch countdown starts at 10, but for Landsat 9, we’re jumping in with L-9!

There are 9 million images in the USGS/NASA Landsat archive! They’re all available for free, for use by scientists, data managers, and anyone else who’s interested. You can even download them!

Landsat 9 won’t be orbiting alone. Working together, Landsat 9 and Landsat 8 will completely image Earth every 8 days! This helps us track changes on the planet’s surface as they happen in near-real-time.

Landsat sees all 7 continents! From Antarctic ice to growing cities to changing forests, Landsat measures land — and coastal regions — all around the globe.

Working in space is really hard. Landsat 6 never made it to orbit, an important reminder that failures can be opportunities to learn and grow. Shortly after the unsuccessful launch, engineers got to work on Landsat 7, which is still collecting data today — 22 years later.

We have 5 decades of Landsat observations, the longest continuous record of Earth’s land surfaces in existence! While building the original Landsat in the 1970s, it would have been hard to imagine that this mission would still be providing crucial data about our planet today.

For each color band collected, Landsat 9 will see 4 times the shades of light as the previous Landsat mission! With more than 16,000 different intensities detected, Landsat 9 will be able to see crucial details on our planet’s surface.

Our eyes detect 3 colors of light: red, green, and blue — and Landsat does too! But Landsat 9 also detects wavelengths that can be combined to measure things our eyes can’t, like crop stress, coral reef health, fires, and more.

There are 2 instruments on Landsat 9! The Operational Land Imager 2 collects light, and works kind of like our eyes — or cameras — to make data-rich images. The Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 measures temperature, helping monitor plant health, fires, and more.

The Landsat program is the result of 1 amazing partnership! For more than 50 years, we’ve worked with the U.S. Geological Survey to design, build, launch, and manage Landsat satellites.

Two agencies working together makes for the longest continuous record of Earth’s surfaces. Now, let’s launch this satellite!

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!

Source : NASA More   

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Chinese KZ-1A returns to flight and lofts new remote sensing satellite into orbit

A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A (KZ-1A) rocket lifted off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in… The post Chinese KZ-1A returns to flight and lofts new remote sensing satellite into orbit appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

Chinese KZ-1A returns to flight and lofts new remote sensing satellite into orbit

A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A (KZ-1A) rocket lifted off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Inner Mongolia at 06:19 UTC on September 27, lofting a new high-resolution remote sensing satellite into orbit.

The rocket lifted off from Site 95 at Jiuquan, marking the 14th flight of a KZ-1 series rocket. This was also the first KZ-1 launch since the Jilin-1 Gaofen-02C launch in September 2020, which ended in failure and the loss of its payload.

China’s KZ-1A rocket is manufactured by the ExPace Technology Corporation, an aerospace company owned by the Chinese government, based out of Wuhan in China’s Hubei province. The rocket is capable of delivering payloads of up to 200 kg into a Sun-Synchronous Orbit, and therefore is mainly marketed as a small satellite launch vehicle. 

ExPace is also in charge of managing the launch, as it has been for all previous flights of the KZ-1A vehicle.

The 20 meter long rocket utilizes four stages, the first three of which are solid-fueled. The first of the three solid fuel stages has a burn time of 65 seconds and an impulse of 2,352 N/kg. The second burns for 62 seconds with an impulse of 2,810 N/kg, followed by a third stage burn lasting 55 seconds with an impulse of 2,850N/kg.

Jilin-1 Gaofen-02D Updates
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  • The fourth and final stage is powered by a liquid-fueled engine and serves as the orbital insertion stage.

    The most recent flight of a KZ-1A, which was intended to deliver the Jilin-1 Gaofen-02C satellite into orbit, ended in failure after “abnormal performance” was detected coming from the launch vehicle, following which the payload failed to enter its pre-set orbit. Today’s launch serves as a return to flight, following an investigation into the cause of the failure on last year’s flight.

    Jilin-1 Gaofen-02D, the 250 kg satellite carried into orbit on today’s launch, is the fifth in the Jilin-1 Gaofen-2 series of remote sensing satellites. It is the third to successfully reach orbit following the failures of the previously mentioned Goafen-02C launch last September, and the failed launch of Gaofen-02E in July of the same year. 

    The Gaofen-2 series of satellites are developed and built by the Chang Guang Satellite Technology Corporation, which specializes in the design and operation of remote sensing satellites for commercial use.

    Artists impression of a Jilin-1 Gaofen-02 spacecraft – via Chang Guang Satellite Tech Company

    The spacecraft is believed to have an operational altitude of 535 km above the surface of Earth, and be able to obtain a static push-scan image with a full-color resolution better than 0.76 meters and a multi-spectral resolution better than 3.1 meters. Images are transmitted to the ground stations via digital transmission with a rate of 1.8Gbps. 

    Gaofen-02D – the fifth Gaofen-02 spacecraft – joins multiple other types of Jilin-1 series remote sensing satellites in orbit, all of which were built by Chang Guang Satellite Technology. Other Jilin-1 satellites in orbit include the two Jilin-1 Kuanfu-01 series spacecraft, which focus on providing high definition video from orbit, and the single Jilin-1 Guangexe-A optical imaging satellite. Overall there are at least 16 currently operating Jilin-1 spacecraft in orbit. 

    The company plans to have approximately 138 Jilin satellites in orbit by 2030. Altogether, these will perform 24/7 all-weather, full-spectrum acquisition segment data and a capability of observing any global arbitrary point with a 10-minute revisit capability. This will create the world’s highest spatial resolution and time resolution space information products.

    (Lead photo via Xinhua)

    The post Chinese KZ-1A returns to flight and lofts new remote sensing satellite into orbit appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

    Source : NASA More   

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