Danielle Kang: 'I probably learned to really love golf in the last four or five years'

“I loved the competition. The game, I learned to love it later."

Danielle Kang: 'I probably learned to really love golf in the last four or five years'

Danielle Kang has put together quite the resume since taking down Jessica Korda more than a decade ago on her way to winning the 2010 U.S. Women’s Amateur. But three years before her match-play triumph at Charlotte (North Carolina) Country Club, the California native was pushed into 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifying without even knowing it. Her brother signed her up and then Kang did the unthinkable: advanced through local and sectional qualifying to earn a spot in the field at Pine Needles Lodge and Golf Club.

She was 14 years old at the time and oh yeah – had only picked up a golf club for the first time a year and a half earlier.

During a recent podcast interview, Kang explained her first love: competition.

“I loved the competition. The game, I learned to love it later.” Kang told podcast host Hally Leadbetter. “I was good at it, which made me like it. I probably learned to really love golf in the last four or five years.

“I felt that golf was sometimes taking things away from me, but then I realized that it has given me so many opportunities.”

Danielle Kang reacts to missing a putt on the ninth green during competition rounds of the Solheim Cup golf tournament at Inverness Club. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports

Since the start of her rookie season in 2012, Kang has won five times on the LPGA tour, including her lone major victory at the 2017 KPMG Women’s PGA Championship (her first win on tour).

She’s represented the United States at the last three Solheim Cups, as well as the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games where she finished T-20.

On the heels of her two-win year in 2020 (LPGA Drive On Championship, Marathon LPGA Classic presented by Dana), she’s yet to hoist hardware in 2021 despite nine top-10 finishes in 19 starts.

Source : Golf Week More   

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Mitsubishi Chemical Kai'Li graphite shafts

Pronounced Ki-Lee, the name is Japanese and translates to "The power of the ocean."

Mitsubishi Chemical Kai'Li graphite shafts

Gear: Mitsubishi Chemical Kai’Li graphite shaft
Price: $300

Mitsubishi Chemical has several popular golf shaft families in its stable, including the Diamana, which debuted in 2005, Fubuki (2010), Kuro Kage (2013) and Tensei, which was released in 2015. Now the company has announced the launching of its first new family of shafts in six years, Kai’Li.

Pronounced Ki-Lee, the name is Japanese and translates to “The power of the ocean.”

The first shaft in the Kai’Li family is Kai’Li White, a shaft designed for faster-swinging golfers who want more stability, low torque, a lower launch angle and less spin off the tee.

To achieve that, Mitsubishi reinforced the tip section with its proprietary MR70 carbon material. According to the company, it is 20 percent stronger than conventional graphites used in golf shafts. Mitsubishi engineers were also able to reduce the amount of resin used in the shaft, and therefore increase the amount of carbon to enhance feel.

Adding MR70 to the tip of the Kai’Li lowers torque and enhances feel. (David Dusek/Golfweek)

For accomplished, faster-swinging players, Mitsubishi claims an increase in feel should lead to greater consistency because golfers will know whether they made center-face contact or not. That will allow them to make minor adjustments to their swing to get optimal performance.

The Kai’Li White will be available in 60, 70 and 80-gram versions in regular, stiff, extra-stiff and tour extra-stiff flexes.

Source : Golf Week More   

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