DHL Has Now Ferried Over 1 Billion Vaccines Around The World

Logistics company DHL has now shipped over one billion vaccines to more than 160 countries since December 2020.…

DHL Has Now Ferried Over 1 Billion Vaccines Around The World

Logistics company DHL has now shipped over one billion vaccines to more than 160 countries since December 2020. DHL has stated that around 10 billion vaccine doses will be needed worldwide by the end of 2021 and that 7-9 billion doses will be necessary each year to fight the virus.

DHL has transported over a billion vaccines around the world in the past 9 months. Photo: Getty Images

One billion vaccine doses since December 2020

DHL, one of the world’s leading logistical firms, has transported over one billion vaccines to more than 160 countries since December 2020. The company has played a key part in the global vaccination rollout, drawing upon its logistical expertise to transport temperature-sensitive vaccines across the world.

Katja Busch, Chief Commercial Officer at DHL, said,

“We are working across multiple supply chain set-ups and managing direct distributions in certain countries. We implemented new, dedicated, and reliable services at an accelerated speed to ship the highly temperature-sensitive vaccines, as well as ancillary supplies and test kits.”

DHL has accomplished the feat with the help of “special active thermal containers equipped with state-of-the-art GPS temperature trackers to ensure consistent temperatures and provide full transparency throughout the entire journey.

dhl
The company has used state-of-the-art tech to store and ship temperature-sensitive vaccines. Photo: DHL

DHL Global Forwarding and DHL Express have transported COVID-19 vaccines from Europe and other origins across Asia-Pacific, South America and Europe. The company notes that the sensitive temperature requirements have been a particular challenge to overcome, not to mention managing the complex supply chain.

Busch added,

“We will continue tapping into our cold chain infrastructure, resilient global network, and deep pharmaceutical logistics knowledge and experience of our people.”

Maintaining the supply chain

In DHL’s ‘Revisiting Pandemic Resilience’ white paper, the company estimates that 7-9 billion vaccine doses will be required annually to keep COVID-19 at bay. As such, DHL recommends that the logistical infrastructure developed for vaccines should be maintained in an “ever-warm” state for the foreseeable future.

DHL said in a statement,

“To facilitate a speedy roll-out of medication (i.e., diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines), governments and industries should maintain “ever-warm” manufacturing capacity, blueprint research, production, and procurement plans, and expand local deployment capabilities.”

DHL European air Transport Boeing 757-200 freighter with
DHL believes vaccine distribution infrastructure should remain in place for the foreseeable future. Photo: Getty Images

The company also recommends “expanding and institutionalizing virus containment and countermeasures,” which would entail practices such as national stockpiles and digital contact tracing.

Claudia Roa, President of Life Sciences and Healthcare at DHL Customer Solutions and Innovation, said,

“Our advantage is that we already had a sophisticated network in place with the necessary healthcare expertise. This allowed us to react swiftly.”

10 billion vaccine doses needed by the end of 2021

DHL has stated that around 10 billion vaccine doses will be required worldwide by the end of the year. High immunization rates will be necessary to prevent further virus variants from emerging and help save lives.

Thomas Ellmann, Vice President of Life Sciences and Healthcare at DHL Customer Solutions and Innovation, said,

“Making a meaningful difference is what drives us, and we are proud of our contribution to the enormous task of delivering COVID-19 vaccines and related critical medical supplies to the right place at the right time, worldwide.”

DHL Airbus A-300 Cargo Airplane
DHL is aiming for broader vaccination coverage across the world. Photo: Getty Images

The company also adds that global distribution is vital to ensure that as many people as possible can get vaccinated. Vaccination rates in first-world countries are considerably higher compared to other parts of the world.

Do you agree with DHL’s assessment that 7-9 billion vaccine doses will be needed each year? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments.

Source : Simple Flying More   

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16 Years On: What Caused The JetBlue Nose Gear Incident?

On September 21, 2005, a JetBlue flight between Burbank and New York City had to do an emergency…

16 Years On: What Caused The JetBlue Nose Gear Incident?

On September 21, 2005, a JetBlue flight between Burbank and New York City had to do an emergency landing at Los Angeles International Airport. The incident was due to a malfunction of the nose gear. But, what happened on that day? Let’s investigate further.

JetBlue’s flight 292 had a hard landing 16 years ago. Photo: Andrewmarino via Wikimedia Commons.

JetBlue Flight 292

JetBlue scheduled Flight 292 between Burbank’s Bob Hope Airport and New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airline used an Airbus A320-232, registration N536JB (and called Canyon Blue).

Onboard Flight 292 on September 21, 2005, were 140 passengers and six crew members. The aircraft departed Burbank at 15:17 and was scheduled to fly nearly 2,500 miles to New York City.

The first officer was flying the aircraft. During the initial departure, he didn’t notice any problem and even had a positive rate of climb, according to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

Nevertheless, a few minutes after, the flight crew noted an error message displayed on the Electric Centralized Aircraft Monitoring system. The crew could not retract the nose landing gear.

While the captain consulted the flight crew operating manual, the first officer flew over Palmdale, California. But, after a while, it became obvious that the flight wouldn’t go all the way to New York.

JetBlue A320
The crew of the flight had to land at Los Angeles International Airport. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

What happened next?

The crew diverted the flight to Long Beach, California. According to the NTSB, the captain decided to perform a flyby of the tower for verification of the gear status.

The tower, JetBlue ground personnel, and a local news helicopter advised him that the nose landing gear was canted 90 degrees to the left.

Instead of turning back to Burbank, the captain decided to land in Los Angeles International Airport. The NTSB discusses the captain’s choice “because it had optimum field conditions, runway length, and better emergency support services.” Before landing, the crew burn fuel for several hours.

Prior to landing, the captain announced its crew and passengers to brace for impact. He touched down at 120 knots, and did not use ground spoilers, reverse thrust, or auto-braking. Once the aircraft completely stopped, the air traffic control tower confirmed that there was no fire, and the passengers deplaned normally, using an airstair.

Both of the nose landing gear tires deflated and tore apart. Despite the abnormal nose landing gear configuration, the airplane stayed on the runway centerline, and its trajectory was unaffected.

16 Years On: What Caused The JetBlue Nose Gear Incident?
Following the incident, the NTSB launched an investigation. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

What caused the incident?

Following the hard landing at Los Angeles, the NTSB launched an investigation on the incident. The Board determined,

“Examination of the nose wheel assembly with a borescope revealed fractured and separated anti-rotation lugs.”

It also added,

“The examination of the nose landing gear assembly revealed that two of the four anti-rotation lugs on the upper support assembly have fractured and separated from the upper support assembly. The other two lugs contained cracks.”

Following the incident, Airbus issued an Operations Engineering Bulletin. This technical information provided a procedure for the flight crew to reset in flight the Brake Steering Control Unit which controls the nose landing gear.

Have you heard of JetBlue’s nose gear incident before? What else do you know? Let us know in the comments below. 

Source : Simple Flying More   

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