Eegle 20m first look: World’s first electric trawler yacht takes on diesel rivals

The Eegle 20m looks set to be the first production electric trawler yacht and it has the speed and range to rival its diesel-powered counterparts...Four 150kW electric motors power the Eegle 20m to an impressive top speed of 20 knotsSilent Yachts may have led the way with its electric cruising catamarans but now a Swiss entrepreneur is hoping to appeal to monohull enthusiasts with the first battery-powered trawler yacht, the Eegle 20m. Designed by Spanish naval architects Bravo Yacht Design, whose previous clients include Rodman, Horizon and Nuva Yachts, it is a 65ft (20m) […] This article Eegle 20m first look: World’s first electric trawler yacht takes on diesel rivals appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

Eegle 20m first look: World’s first electric trawler yacht takes on diesel rivals

The Eegle 20m looks set to be the first production electric trawler yacht and it has the speed and range to rival its diesel-powered counterparts...

Four 150kW electric motors power the Eegle 20m to an impressive top speed of 20 knots

Silent Yachts may have led the way with its electric cruising catamarans but now a Swiss entrepreneur is hoping to appeal to monohull enthusiasts with the first battery-powered trawler yacht, the Eegle 20m.

Designed by Spanish naval architects Bravo Yacht Design, whose previous clients include Rodman, Horizon and Nuva Yachts, it is a 65ft (20m) swift trawler yacht with a top speed of 20 knots and a range of 80nm under electric power alone.

For longer journeys, a petrol-powered generator extends the range to over 1,000nm at its normal cruising speed of 7.5 knots. The first boat is already in-build at French yard Martinez Construction Navale with an expected launch date next year.

Article continues below…


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£1730000

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According to lead designer Tia Simo, the trawler style is particularly well suited to electrification. Its shallow keel allows all of its 600kWh lithium ion batteries to be installed below the water close to the centreline.

This low centre of gravity makes for an extremely stable design, which keeps roll to a minimum and makes the standard fin stabilisers even more effective.

The four compact 150kW motors also take up far less space than big diesel engines and are packaged below the tender garage floor.

Eegle-electric-trawler-yacht-cross-section

No need for an engineroom as the motors and batteries fit beneath the floor

With no complex cooling systems or daily engine checks to worry about, there is no need for a conventional engineroom, freeing up almost all of the lower deck for accommodation.

Each pair of motors is linked to a single gearbox and shaft. In displacement mode, only one motor is running on each shaft but for shorter bursts both motors are engaged to push it into semi-planing mode.

To make the most of this, the hull has been tuned to be at its most efficient at either 7.5 knots or 18 knots.

Eegle-electric-trawler-yacht-hull

Shallow keel is ideal for battery location below the water

The garage itself houses the 50kW petrol range extender as well as a pair of Jet Skis or a single larger tender.

The reason for specifying a petrol rather than diesel generator is partly because of its smaller dimensions and quieter running but also because its 1,000-litre fuel tank can be used to refill the Jet Skis as well.

The final part of the equation is an array of solar panels on the flybridge hardtop and wheelhouse roof capable of generating up to 9kW.

Eegle-electric-trawler-yacht-anchored

Petrol range extender shares its 1,000 litre fuel tank with jetskis

This is enough to propel the Eegle 20m at a modest 3.5 knots on solar power alone, although realistically it will be used in tandem with the batteries to extend the all-electric cruising range beyond 80nm and top-up the batteries when at rest.

The batteries can also be recharged using shore power, with the time taken depending on the number of available sockets and rating of the power supply.

With no engineroom eating into lower deck space, there is room for a larger than normal full-beam owner’s suite towards the aft end of the hull with a separate dressing room, study area and bathroom.

Eegle-electric-trawler-yacht-owners-cabin

Vast master suite has a dressing room, study and bathroom

This still leaves space for two further doubles amidships and a VIP suite in the bow. The other unusual feature of the design is a full-beam saloon that spreads across the space usually occupied by the side decks.

The extra width makes for a very spacious main deck that’s all one level with a curved breakfast bar next to the aft galley, a generous lounging area amidships and a twin helm station forward.

It has all been left open-plan to maximise sightlines and make the most of the 360-degree views. A door next to the helm gives access to the foredeck but it’s not entirely clear how you’d deal with fenders or carry the lazy line forward when mooring stern-to.

Eegle-electric-trawler-yacht-saloon

Curved breakfast bar in full-beam saloon of the Eegle 20m

The man behind the new Eegle brand, Swiss entrepreneur Adrien Antenen, made his money in recycling plants and wants to use his expertise in sustainability to launch a new range of environmentally friendly electric craft.

He commissioned the design from BYD and is financing the build of the first boat with a view to making it a full production yacht. The finished boat will be priced at around €2.5million ex tax.

Tia Simo, lead designer of the Eegle 20m, who studied naval architecture at Southampton University, told MBY: “We share the same idea as the client.

“We have to push to create yachts which are environmentally friendly. If we take care of our seas, we will be able to enjoy it in the future.”

Eegle 20m specification

LOA: 64ft 8in (19.73m)
Beam: 16ft 5in (5.0m)
Displacement: 22.9 tonnes
Power: 4 x 150kW electric motors
Batteries: 600kWh lithium ion
Solar panels: 9kW
Range extender: 50kW petrol
Fuel capacity: 1,000 litres
Cruising speed: 7.5 knots
Top speed: 20 knots
Pure electric range: 80nm@ 7.5 knots
Hybrid electric range: 1,000nm @ 7.5 knots (range extender)

First published in the October 2021 issue of MBY.


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2022 Invincible 33 Catamaran

The 33 Catamaran from Invincible is a formidable fishing machine that's also well-equipped for long hours of casual cruising.

2022 Invincible 33 Catamaran

Overview

I used to dis on catamarans. The early designs were soft-riding but wobbled over the seas like a drunken sailor. That’s all different with Invincible’s Morrelli and Melvin hull designs.

The hull-style name is a mouthful. A “hybrid semi-asymmetrical hull” applies the best characteristics of an asymmetrical catamaran with the stable-at-rest and soft-riding behavior of symmetrical cats. Yep, it’s a mouthful. To visualize an asymmetrical catamaran hull, imagine a V-bottom boat sliced longitudinally from stem to stern. Separate those two halves and you have a symmetrical cat with vertical inboard side walls and tapered outside side walls. A symmetrical cat has identical sponsons, tapered equally inboard and outboard. Blending the two styles provides turn-hugging inboard sponson side walls with wave-deflecting outside side walls. As a result, the boat makes sharp turns without awkward outboard heeling, and even in quartering seas, the sponsons stand firm in the slop. In fact, a catamaran design like this runs better in moderate chop, as if the sponsons know they have a job to do and go right to it. Top off the performance package with double steps, which break surface tension and release the hull from the water as bubble streams are introduced under the hull.


The 33 Catamaran serves up a smooth ride. (Garrett Cortese/)

So, the ride is smooth in rough water, stable when trolling at displacement speeds, and it resists rolling in beam seas—all part of a proven formula for passenger comfort and serious fishing.

Engines

The 33 can be equipped with up to 900 hp, making a pair of Mercury Racing 450R engines top the horsepower heap. With the dual Verado 400s, we made nearly 62 mph with a 6.6-second hole shot, and a quick 11 seconds to 30 mph. I would expect nearly comparable results from Mercury’s newer V-8 300 hp platform.

The helm offers massive room for dual 20-inch (or larger) screens.
The helm offers massive room for dual 20-inch (or larger) screens. (Garrett Cortese/)

Interior and Accessories

The helm station comes from Invincible’s 36, and the three-wide station seating from the 35 cat. The centered helm keeps the skipper’s mates at each elbow. The leaning-post seat is bolstered for three comfortable seating or leaning stations. A step below the helm adds comfort while standing or seated. The station itself offers massive room for dual 20-inch (or larger) screens—in our case, a 9-inch VesselView, an Icom VHF and a Fusion stereo controller. The hardtop stretches wide and aft of the leaning post, keeping the helm glare-free.

Inside the helm, there is ample room for a plumbed head, but the bonus besides storage is spacious access to the back of the instrument panel for maintenance and easy access to batteries, switches and breakers—best of all, they are logically and artfully wired.

But the 33 shines when you stop to fish.

Start with dual livewells. An oval well with a clear acrylic lid in the transom is 65 gallons, pressurized and fed from a sea chest in the starboard sponson with three pumps. There’s also a larger 65-gallon livewell belowdecks in the starboard sponson, so live-baiters can carry and coddle hundreds of baits.

The fighting cockpit is impressively spacious.
The fighting cockpit is impressively spacious. (Garrett Cortese/)

The fighting cockpit is impressively spacious, taking full advantage of the 10-foot-3-inch beam. To port of the transom livewell is a pair of drawers ideal for tackle, ropes, or wash and wax supplies.

A 33 cat is ideal in size for many needs but rare as hens’ teeth on the market. Insetta makes a 35-foot cat with asymmetrical hulls. Sighting down the centerline beneath, you’ll see the vertical sponson walls, but if it’s in the water, you can’t see the hydrofoil spanning from sponson to sponson. The purpose is to give lift, reduce drag, and add stability and comfort to the on-plane ride. Topside, its beam is 5 inches wider at 10 feet, 8 inches, and though the length and beam are larger than the Invincible, somehow Invincible makes the cockpit feel larger.

The center console comes from Invincible’s 35 cat, giving the three-wide seating at the helm and mezzanine. Yet it nests in the deck, preserving wide walkways fore and aft while providing the amenities of the larger vessel.

The mezzanine seat (back of the leaning post) is three-wide, and the seating angle is designed to lean back even when the boat is on plane. Pull the seatback down, releasing the magnetic catches, and three compartments hold four more rigging drawers, three utility boxes and a tool stowage area. Not enough storage? No problem. Cabinets on the port and starboard sides of the leaning-post seat hold utility boxes, drawers and leader hangers.

Four larger fish boxes in the floor can alternatively be used for fenders. They pump out with durable “gulper” pumps instead of temperamental macerators. Two large dry lockers flank the anchor locker at the bow.

A dual lounge sits forward of the helm.
A dual lounge sits forward of the helm. (Garrett Cortese/)

And the final jewel in the Invincible’s spaciously featured fishing and touring machine? A dual lounge sits forward of the helm, with thick cushions, deep bolsters, armrests and handy cup holders. Beneath it? You guessed it—an insulated coffin box that can be opened up for a fish box, divided for preserving iced food, or just used as dry storage.

Invincible’s great ride and spacious deck make it a formidable fishing machine, but one that casual cruisers will be eager to enjoy for long hours on the water.

How We Tested

  • Engines: Dual Mercury 400 Verados
  • Drive/Prop: Mercury Enertia Eco 16″ x 18″ stainless-steel propset
  • Gear Ratio: 1.75:1 Fuel Load: 50 gal. Water on Board: 0 gal. Crew Weight: 600 lb.

High Points

  • Forty-seven rod holders arrayed in gunwales, the transom, and the leaning post and center console.
  • Mezzanine seating converts to a tackle station with spacious storage, including compartments to port and starboard of the leaning post.
  • Foredeck houses an anchor locker flanked by two large storage compartments for fenders.

Low Points

  • Wraparound bow seating would be a nice option for added comfort.
  • Side boarding door would be a nice addition to this design.

Pricing and Specs

Price: See dealer
LOA: 33'11"
Beam: 10'3"
Draft (max): 1'10"(engines up)
Displacement (approx.): 9,800 lb.
Bridge Clearance: 8'8"
Fuel Capacity: 400 gal.
Max Horsepower: 900
Available Power: Outboard power to 900 hp

Speed, Efficiency, Operation

Invincible 33 Catamaran Certified Test Results
Invincible 33 Catamaran Certified Test Results (Boating Magazine/)

Invincible Boats - Opa-Locka, Florida; 305-685-2704; invincibleboats.com

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