Ella Eyre: O2 Ritz Manchester – live review

Ella Eyre O2 Ritz Manchester 19th October 2021 Ella Eyre staked her claim to be the queen of British pop with a set full of absolute bangers at Manchester’s O2 Ritz. Paul Clarke joined the party and Melanie Smith took the photos. Once upon a time, Ella Eyre was the go-to voice for dance acts […] The post Ella Eyre: O2 Ritz Manchester – live review appeared first on Louder Than War.

Ella Eyre:  O2 Ritz Manchester – live review

Ella Eyre
O2 Ritz Manchester
19th October 2021

Ella Eyre staked her claim to be the queen of British pop with a set full of absolute bangers at Manchester’s O2 Ritz. Paul Clarke joined the party and Melanie Smith took the photos.

Once upon a time, Ella Eyre was the go-to voice for dance acts like Rudimental and Sigala and she released her debut solo album Feline way back in 2015. Apart from a few singles, Eyre had been pretty quiet since, but tonight she staked out a claim to be the queen of British pop.

Eyre had been unlucky with the pandemic as this tour was cancelled twice, and her long-awaited second album had also been delayed, but she still managed to attract a sell-out crowd for her comeback tour. And what a crowd. It had the feel of a particularly raucous school prom mixed with a Club 18-30 pub crawl in Ibiza as a bunch of shirtless lads strutted around in just beach trunks. It was a typically grim Manc night outside, so you had to admire one hardy soul who wandered around in a bikini.

From the moment Eyre bounded on stage in a transparent blue coat, snazzy trousers and long braids she looked every inch the star, and that must come from the belief you possess one of the best pop voices around.

Ella Eyre 16 @ O2 Ritz Manchester 19/10/21

There can be a lot of snobbery around pop acts as if they are somehow inferior to tired old punk acts regurgitating their ‘hits’ for a load of bald blokes. And, of course, that nostalgia has a place, but so does Eyre who created a riotous house party for fans, some of whom were in junior school when she had her first number one hit with Rudimental.

She had the crowd from the first note her well-drilled live band hit, as they blasted into recent single Answerphone Eyre bounced around the stage and was clearly delighted to be back, as the obligatory wall of phones recorded her every move. Crowds like this can be very different to other gigs as the five young women in front of us were not only singing along, but created a live Instagram feed as the show progressed. It’s rare to be interrupted mid-gig and be asked to take a picture, but such is the relaxed atmosphere generated by these wonderfully polite and spirited young music fans, you don’t mind.

Ella Eyre 7 @ O2 Ritz Manchester 19/10/21

And acts like Eyre actually engage with their audience and understand people (and in many cases their parents) had paid good money to be here, so talking to an audience was hardly the chore some acts find to be. That energy and connection came right back in the numerous singalongs throughout the show.

Like many of her competitors including Anne-Marie (who took over vocal duties in Rudimental and Mabel), she sang driving pop songs based on her own emotional ups and downs, which clearly struck a chord as the audience kept joining in. Comeback was a wonderful smack down to a cheating boyfriend, (who always crawled back after being a dick). Eyre jogged on the spot at the top of the white stairs of a simple but effective setup. Another recent single, L.O.V.(e), proved to be another positive song that aimed to empower her fans.

Ella Eyre 8 @ O2 Ritz Manchester 19/10/21Ella Eyre 15 @ O2 Ritz Manchester 19/10/21 It was a brave decision to put Rudimental’s smash Waiting All Night in the middle of the set, but no matter as the place erupted. The venue’s famous dancefloor took a hammering as the whole crowd decided to bounce up and down in time to a timeless banger. Things slowed down a bit for the ballad New Me as Eyre really let rip, that voice soared to smack down another idiot, before ripping into Business, even the backing singers got sassy. She closed with a massive Came Here For Love to a forest of arms. She really owned that collaboration with Sigala, as she should because it was her voice that made all those songs such big hits.

She came back for the encore with just her keyboard player, Eyre offered the empowering We Don’t Have To Take Our Clothes Off, which given the age profile of the crowd was an important anthem in the age of #MeToo. Their parents would have been delighted that a song about having respectful and loving relationships was delivered with real passion. Another collaboration with Sigala, Just Got Paid, sent this good-natured crowd home with a big smile on their faces.

It’s strange that such a quality performer isn’t regularly topping the charts in her own right, so she needs to get that second album out ASAP. With a decent festival season next year, Ella Eyre should be challenging Dua Lipa, Anne-Marie and Mabel for a pop crown she most definitely proved she has the pipes to win.

Photo gallery:

Please note: Use of these images in any form without permission is illegal. If you wish to contact the photographer please email: mel@mudkissphotography.co.uk

You can follow Ella Eyre on Facebook and Twitter.

~

Words by Paul Clarke, you can see his author profile here.

All photos by Melanie Smith – Louder Than War | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Portfolio

The post Ella Eyre: O2 Ritz Manchester – live review appeared first on Louder Than War.

Source : Louder Than War More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year – EP review

The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year (Dammit) CD | DL Out Now Maidstone’s Cato Street Conspiracy have something of a street punk feel, with a pair of boots firmly planted in the ’80s. When it comes to picking a band name that “means something” Cato Street Conspiracy hit the jackpot. If you whack […] The post The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year – EP review appeared first on Louder Than War.

The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year – EP review

The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year

(Dammit)

CD | DL

Out Now

Maidstone’s Cato Street Conspiracy have something of a street punk feel, with a pair of boots firmly planted in the ’80s.

When it comes to picking a band name that “means something” Cato Street Conspiracy hit the jackpot. If you whack Cato Street Conspiracy into a search engine you’ll get countless links to the tale of a group of radicals who were arrested and hanged or transported to Australia after planning to assassinate the British Prime Minister and cabinet in 1820.

Despite the serious name, Cato Street Conspiracy appear to have quite a flippant piss take manner. They are straight up, no-frills punk. They have a touch of what these days is called street punk but used to be more commonly known as Oi!  If you were to drop their songs into one of the recent Riot City or No Future compilation reissues they might sneak in under the radar. Even the lyrics fit that theme.

On this 5 track EP, they veer between two sounds with a pair of boots firmly planted in the 80s. Put together the urgent drums with the rawness of the guitar and the raw raspy vocal on songs like Repent and Carnage and there is a touch of early English Dogs around the time of the Mad Punx and English Dogs 12″. Not quite as high octane or raw but it gives you a sense of their direction of travel. The guitar also reminds me of Blitzkrieg for some reason. At other times they are more in the yobby singalong style of bands like The Ejected and plenty of Oi bands since, seemingly accentuated by clipped high hat and snare. This is especially evident when they deploy call and response choruses E.g. “Got no money…no job” on Got No Money and “Why Wont You….Listen to me” on Listen To Me.

This Time Next Year by Cato Street Conspiracy

While overall I prefer the more upbeat raw songs like Carnage and Repent, the more sedate sing song title track This Time Next Year is notable for a crisp catchy guitar line which evokes (for me) Shot By Both Sides by Magazine. Something the guitar tone, timing and slight bend of the strings fired the neurons in my brain and now I can’t rid of the bloody tune. Even their cultural references reveal something about the age of the band. For this song, they lift Delboy Trotter’s line from Only Fools and Horses for the chorus “Don’t worry son, this time next year we’ll be millionaires”.  That’s certainly not the delusions of the label DIY Dammit records who released the EP.

Dammit records describe themselves as  “a low-key record label from the southeast of the UK that wants to help struggling unsigned bands get their music recorded, published, promoted and sold. We’re not here to make loads of money, just promote good music, YOUR music.”

Available from Dammit records on Bandcamp

Cato Street Conspiracy are on

~

Poor comparisons articulated by Nathan Brown. Check out his Louder Than War Author Archive.

The post The Cato Street Conspiracy: This Time Next Year – EP review appeared first on Louder Than War.

Source : Louder Than War More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.