Erasmus’s extraordinary 62 minute video rant at Aussie ref Nic Berry stuns World Rugby

Rassie Erasmus has offered to stand down from South Africa’s series against the British and Irish Lions after posting online an hour-long video in which he launches an unprecedented attack on Australian referee Nic Berry. Erasmus’ extraordinary monologue lasts 62 minutes and includes 26 clips from Saturday’s 22-17 first Test defeat by the Lions at […]

Erasmus’s extraordinary 62 minute video rant at Aussie ref Nic Berry stuns World Rugby

Rassie Erasmus has offered to stand down from South Africa’s series against the British and Irish Lions after posting online an hour-long video in which he launches an unprecedented attack on Australian referee Nic Berry.

Erasmus’ extraordinary monologue lasts 62 minutes and includes 26 clips from Saturday’s 22-17 first Test defeat by the Lions at Cape Town Stadium, with Berry’s performance repeatedly in the crosshairs.

South Africa’s director of rugby is addressing World Rugby’s head of referees Joel Jutge and director of rugby Joe Schmidt during the video, in which he says he’s willing to quit for the second and third matches of the series.

GOT A SPARE 62 MINUTES? WATCH THE ERASMUS VIDEO HERE

World Rugby is understood to be concerned and disappointed by comments that pile pressure on the officials for Saturday’s second Test and is seeking an explanation from SA Rugby.

“World Rugby notes the comments made by Rassie Erasmus. The nature of these will be raised with the union via the usual official channels and no further comment will be made at this stage,” a statement from World Rugby read on Thursday.

The rant sees Erasmus, dressed in a Springbok training top and cap, provide detailed analysis of every decision he believes Berry got wrong.

The most sensitive of many criticisms is that the Aussie official treated South Africa captain Siya Kolisi and Alun Wyn Jones, the Lions skipper, differently.

“There is a vast difference between who he was taking seriously and who he wasn’t taking seriously,” Erasmus said.

“The way they listened to Siya compared to the way they listened to Alun Wyn was definitely not with the same respect. It shows the difference in attitude towards the Springboks and the Lions.”

Erasmus defends his own bizarre and controversial role as a water carrier, accuses the Lions’ illegal scrummaging of inflicting a neck injury to his prop Ox Nche and blasts Warren Gatland’s objection to Marius Jonker being appointed TMO.

Berry, who is replaced by Ben O’Keeffe for the second Test but will still run the touchline, is the real target as Erasmus highlights perceived inconsistencies and rails at the length of time it took to receive officiating feedback from World Rugby.

“We definitely felt that the way things unfolded on the field, didn’t benefit us by staying quiet,” said Erasmus, the mastermind of South Africa’s 2019 World Cup triumph.

“In my position as director of rugby, if this means I step away from being water carrier, that is fine.

“If this means I get a fine I will step away from the management team. If this means the Springboks will be in trouble I will say I did this in isolation.

“If you think this was going over the top and it shouldn’t go out to the media, I did this in a personal capacity and not as part of the Springboks.

“It is me personally that did this because I believe in fairness. I believe two teams must have equal chance of competing in a match.

“I am not saying the referee was a cheat at all. I am saying we just wanted clarity on a Sunday night which we have now got on a Tuesday.

“I am not very convinced with the clarity with what we got from Nic Berry in this match.

“Let the Springboks and the Lions have equal chance on the field when it comes to laws, respect and the way players get treated.”

Source : The Roar More   

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Who doesn’t wish the incredible Ian Thorpe was an expert commentator for their favourite sport?

Ian Thorpe was the second biggest star of the Sydney Olympics, and he’s fast becoming one the biggest of the Tokyo Games. Who among us casual, once-every-major-meet, swim fans doesn’t pine for the elite analysis he’s providing on Channel Seven’s swimming-heavy coverage of the Olympics in their favourite week-in-week-out code? As an athlete there was […]

Who doesn’t wish the incredible Ian Thorpe was an expert commentator for their favourite sport?

Ian Thorpe was the second biggest star of the Sydney Olympics, and he’s fast becoming one the biggest of the Tokyo Games.

Who among us casual, once-every-major-meet, swim fans doesn’t pine for the elite analysis he’s providing on Channel Seven’s swimming-heavy coverage of the Olympics in their favourite week-in-week-out code?

As an athlete there was a lot of expectation on Thorpe’s young shoulders and he delivered time and again. Now, at 38, and 21 years after his first Olympic gold medal swim, he has the nation in his thrall once more.

Each session has thrown new light on his talents, be it predicting times and winners with freakish accuracy, to describing techincal minutiae in ways that make swimming fascinating to those of us who thought we were just here to enjoy a bit of mindless Aussie gold.

On Thursday, the Channel Seven socials shared an almost 10 minute ‘clip’ of Thorpey deconstructing Ariare Titmus’s state of mind and body which became a remarkable segment that took the viewers through the final 15 metres of Caeleb Dressel’s 100m freestyle victory over Kyle Chalmers.

Who watches a 10 minute clip of anything on the internet? When it’s Thorpey talking about my eighth favourite sport, apparently I do.

Thorpe pinpoints exactly why it was Dressel who gained a .06 second advantage for gold, focussing on a short stretch where the American puts his head down and fangs it, forgoing a breath, to stave off the faster-finishing Australian.

Thorpe’s analysis is bright and colourful but intellectual too. And the segment shows off his versatility.

When asked by host Hamish McLachlan what it is like, being there, metres away from an Olympic gold, gasping for breath, Thorpe’s response stops you cold.

“At this point, when you take a breath, it feels like razor blades are cutting through your lungs.”

His summary of those last decisive metres, the stroke patterns and power shifts, helps you understand how it was won and lost, and elevates an already exciting race to something more momentus, surely the aim of every ananlyst on every sport, everywhere.

Thorpe was great too, on the peculiar experience that Titmus is currently going through.

Having won her first, and quickly after, a second Olympic gold medal, Titmus seemed angry with herself early Thursday when the 4x200m relay team she led off finished with bronze. Titmus clearly felt she had let her team down, even though the first three teams went under the previous world record.

Titmus was back in the pool for the night session and qualified for the 800 metres final, but made her state of mind and body clear.

“I’m absolutely buggered,” she said. “Honestly I’m exhausted. I keep thinking back to Beijing, it was the same as this morning’s heats. Michael Phelps won eight golds. I have done two and I’m wrecked.

“It puts into perspective for me how amazing he was.”

Again, Thorpe was superb in detailing exactly what Titmus was living through right now, having accomplished everything she had dream of early in the meet and now having to fight on through muscle soreness and mental exhaustion too.

“There’s a toll that comes with that,” says Thorpe. “We call her the Terminator but we also see another side to her.

“How drained she must be from the wins, the success, the highs that you get from that. And trying to bring yourself back down to where you can race at your best is a difficult thing to do.”

But of course there’s layers to it, which Thorpe shows us as well in a discussion of what the size of the bubbles under Titmus’s hands during the race tell us about her levels of fatigue and lapses of technique.

And there is a clearly an appetite for this. Ian Thorpe is still a popular champion.

Source : The Roar More   

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