Eternals Clip: Marvel's Newest, Oldest Heroes Save Some Helpless Humans

The first official clip from Marvel's "Eternals" has arrived, and it features sea monsters and sign language. When a winged murder dragon comes crawling out of the ocean, who's going to be there to save the prehistoric boy it wants to eat? Why, Earth's original superheroes, of course. At 26 films and counting, you might think the Marvel Cinematic Universe has nothing new left to offer, but "Eternals" marks a number of firsts. It's the first MCU film helmed by an Oscar winner for Best Director — Chloé Zhao. It's also the first MCU film to receive a PG-13 rating for "brief sexuality," and it will introduce the first deaf... The post Eternals Clip: Marvel's Newest, Oldest Heroes Save Some Helpless Humans appeared first on /Film.

Eternals Clip: Marvel's Newest, Oldest Heroes Save Some Helpless Humans

The first official clip from Marvel's "Eternals" has arrived, and it features sea monsters and sign language. When a winged murder dragon comes crawling out of the ocean, who's going to be there to save the prehistoric boy it wants to eat? Why, Earth's original superheroes, of course.

At 26 films and counting, you might think the Marvel Cinematic Universe has nothing new left to offer, but "Eternals" marks a number of firsts. It's the first MCU film helmed by an Oscar winner for Best Director — Chloé Zhao. It's also the first MCU film to receive a PG-13 rating for "brief sexuality," and it will introduce the first deaf superhero in the MCU.

Her name is Makkari, and she's played by Lauren Ridloff. In the clip below, you can see her and Kumail Nanjiani's character, Kingo, signing a bit as they come to the rescue.

Eternals Clip

As you can see — and as you can probably guess from their names — Makkari and Kingo aren't messing around. She has Flash-like super-speed, and apparently, enough super-strength to knock a huge monster off a sea cliff. He shoots energy blasts and orbs from his winning finger guns, while their fearless leader, Richard Madden's Ikaris, shoots energy beams out of his eyes like Superman or Cyclops.

According to MCU lore, the Eternals have been around for a good 7,000 years. They don't look a day over 6,000, but you might say their movie is an adventure 7,000 years in the making — not unlike "Jurassic Park," except younger and less prone to spitting poison on actors named Knight who have played characters named Nedry or Newman.

Personally, I can't help but think there's a big missed opportunity here. Why not go further back in time a full 65 million years and have the Eternals fighting dinosaurs? Maybe they could even tame some dinos, saddle them up, and ride around saving cavemen. They could start with the GEICO Caveman, who could be spun off into his own solo film and shared GEICO Cavemen universe.

"Eternals" also stars Gemma Chan, Angelina Jolie, Brian Tyree Henry, Lia McHugh, Don Lee, Barry Keoghan, Salma Hayek, and Kit Harington. Here's the synopsis:

"Following the events of Avengers: Endgame, an unexpected tragedy forces [the Eternals] out of the shadows to reunite against mankind's most ancient enemy, The Deviants."

"Eternals" is in theaters only on November 5, 2021.

Read this next: Spider-Man Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

The post Eternals Clip: Marvel's Newest, Oldest Heroes Save Some Helpless Humans appeared first on /Film.

Source : Slash Film More   

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The AMPTP Has Until October 18 To Make IATSE An Offer They Deserve — Or Else They Strike

Last week, the International Association of Theater and Stage Employees (IATSE) voted to authorize a strike if their leadership couldn't reach a deal on more humane work hours and living wage increases with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). Well, it looks like they just might be heading to the picket lines, and Hollywood is starting to brace for that eventuality. We covered the IATSE demands and why these changes are needed for the everyday on-set employees that make up that union before the vote went into effect. The short version is that the unending crunch... The post The AMPTP Has Until October 18 to Make IATSE an Offer They Deserve -- or Else They Strike appeared first on /Film.

The AMPTP Has Until October 18 To Make IATSE An Offer They Deserve — Or Else They Strike

Last week, the International Association of Theater and Stage Employees (IATSE) voted to authorize a strike if their leadership couldn't reach a deal on more humane work hours and living wage increases with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). Well, it looks like they just might be heading to the picket lines, and Hollywood is starting to brace for that eventuality.

We covered the IATSE demands and why these changes are needed for the everyday on-set employees that make up that union before the vote went into effect. The short version is that the unending crunch time of filming your favorite TV shows, streaming series, and movies is literally endangering the health and safety of the behind the scenes workers. Twelve-hour days are the standard, but it's very common for these to push into 14–17 hour days, and the way scheduling works tends to mean the crew even lose their weekends.

There's another side to this involving "New Media" (ie Netflix, Hulu, and the like) who are wanting to stick with their original, decades-old deal with IATSE that pays their members less and doesn't cover enough of their pension and health care costs. That made sense when those platforms weren't established, but it's hard to argue they're not the dominant force for filmed content these days.

Productions Are Dealing With The Strike Threat In The Worst Way Possible

Once the strike authorization was given by the crew members (with a whopping 98% voting in favor of authorizing a strike), the producers re-entered negotiations. But, according to IATSE president Matthew D. Loeb, the talks don't "reflect any sense of urgency" on the part of the producers, which has brought us to the brink of a strike. 

If a deal is not made over the weekend, all IATSE members will not show up to work on Monday. If they do, it will be with picket signs in hand instead of boom mics and gaffer tape.

Hollywood is preparing for this, and in many cases, they're doing so in the absolute worst possible way. I've been hearing from IATSE sources that some productions have forced last-minute changes to their schedule in order to shoot through the weekend, getting as much in the can as possible before a strike that will surely shut down most productions. This was recently corroborated by IATSE's official Twitter account.

It's an ironic move by the industry considering the whole reason the crew members are willing to walk out and strike is because of insane hours.

Projects Currently Shooting Won't Be The Only Ones Shutting Down

Variety has a couple of stories detailing how different areas of the industry are preparing. One is about the extra duties writers will need to shoulder should writers assistants (who are IATSE) go on strike. It breaks down a lot of organizational stuff, like keeping their own notes and making sure everyone on a show has the most recent pages/up-to-date script. That's the stuff that can slow down production when you remove assistants from the equation. 

Another talks about how networks and streamers will be impacted. I find this one to be pretty curious, particularly that Variety is optimistic that the two sides will reach a deal before a strike can start at 12:01 am PT Monday, October 18, which is not what I've been told from sources within IATSE. 

They also mention how shows currently in production, like Netflix's new season of "Cobra Kai," might have to be paused should a strike occur. They emphasize that, if that happens, it's not a big deal since established streaming services have tons of stuff already wrapped and waiting to come out.

This doesn't strike me as wholly accurate. IATSE covers a wide variety of film workers, including editors. If there is a strike and it's a lengthy one, you're going to see any show not 100% fully finished facing a delay. That could mean stuff like the new season of "Stranger Things" being delayed, even though they've finished shooting.

Every indication I've gotten thus far is that a strike is going to happen. That said, it's always possible the AMPTP will give in to IATSE crew demands over the weekend, and a shutdown can be averted. 

IATSE has the support of just about every Hollywood union, who will stand with them in solidarity, so the pressure on the AMPTP is building. I guess we'll see what happens on Monday.

Read this next: The Best Movies Of 2021 So Far

The post The AMPTP Has Until October 18 to Make IATSE an Offer They Deserve -- or Else They Strike appeared first on /Film.

Source : Slash Film More   

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