Expert: Coronavirus Mental Health Curve Will Take Even Longer To Flatten

The effects on our mental health could be felt long after the coronavirus pandemic ends.

Expert: Coronavirus Mental Health Curve Will Take Even Longer To Flatten

BERGEN COUNTY, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — The effects on our mental health could be felt long after the coronavirus pandemic ends.

As CBS2’s Nick Caloway reported Tuesday, there’s a second curve that needs to be flattened.

Stress, loneliness, depression, and fear are now touching millions of Americans. Even what used to be a simple task like going grocery shopping is now a source of anxiety for many.

“I plan days out and check social media to see who has what and if the lines are long, or if they’re stocked or not stocked, and I usually now hit multiple stores,” one woman said.

“Very, very stressful. It’s making my anxiety go up. I feel like I’m going to need a therapist after this,” another woman said.

And she’s not alone.

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Dr. Robin Goodman is a clinical psychologist in New York. She said the pandemic has become more than a public health crisis. For many, it is traumatic.

“This is a time when people are witnessing or experiencing an event that can be potentially life-threatening, and cause bodily harm,” Goodman said.

MORE: Coronavirus Taking Emotional, Physical Toll On Doctors: ‘I’ve Never Spent So Much Time Crying’

Goodman said for many of us this is the most traumatic event we have witnessed in our lifetimes, and it’s normal to feel a range of emotions.

“When we feel threatened, we may shut down. We may feel helpless. We may feel irritable. We may have trouble concentrating. That is all normal. Think about if you broke your leg, it would make sense that it hurts,” Goodman said.

CORONAVIRUS: NY Health Dept. | NY Call 1-(888)-364-3065 | NYC Health Dept. | NYC Call 311, Text COVID to 692692 | NJ COVID-19 Info Hub | NJ Call 1-(800)-222-1222 or 211, Text NJCOVID to 898211 | CT Health Dept. | CT Call 211 | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

As we all stay home to flatten the COVID-19 curve, the mental health curve will take longer to flatten.

For those who may be experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety, Dr. Goodman has three tips:

  • Be aware of how you’re feeling.
  • Acknowledge and accept that it’s okay to have those feelings.
  • And, finally, act.

“Then do something. Maybe it’s to distract. Maybe it’s more screen time. Maybe it’s go bake cookies. Maybe it’s have a dance party. Maybe it’s text your best friend or your mom and check in,” Goodman said.

Since the outbreak started, physicians and therapists have rapidly pivoted to telemedicine. So, there is still access to care, even in a quarantine.

Source : CBS News York More   

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Cuomo, Trump Say USNS Comfort Is No Longer Needed In New York To Assist In Coronavirus Battle

The Comfort came to New York with 1,000 beds available to treat non-COVID trauma patients only, but there weren't that many of them.

Cuomo, Trump Say USNS Comfort Is No Longer Needed In New York To Assist In Coronavirus Battle

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — After Gov. Andrew Cuomo and President Donald Trump met at the White House on Tuesday, it was determined the USNS Navy hospital ship Comfort is no longer needed in New York.

Trump announced the USNS Comfort will head back to base in Virginia after about three weeks moored in the Hudson River.

“We’ll be bringing the ship back at the earliest time and we’ll get it ready for its next mission,” Trump said.

“We’ve kind of seen a leveling off,” commanding officer Capt. Patrick Amersbach said. “We’ve treated over 170 patients, which includes very complicated COVID-positive patients as well as those COVID-negative.”

Of those 170 patients, 100 have been discharged and 21 are currently still on ventilators, CBS2’s Alice Gainer reports.

Infectious disease had never been treated on the ship before.

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  • Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home
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  • Tips For Parents To Help Kids Cope
  • Complete Coronavirus Coverage

The Comfort came to New York with 1,000 beds available to treat non-COVID trauma patients only, but there weren’t that many of them.

After a desperate plea from the governor, the mission changed to allow for COVID-19 treatment.

It was taken down to 500 beds. Those providing direct patient care were moved off the ship into hotels and disinfecting procedures were ramped up.

A total of five personnel tested positive.

CORONAVIRUS: NY Health Dept. | NY Call 1-(888)-364-3065 | NYC Health Dept. | NYC Call 311, Text COVID to 692692 | NJ Health Dept. | NJ Call 1-(800)-222-1222 or 211, Text NJCOVID to 898211 | CT Health Dept. | CT Call 211

After doing the math, Cuomo says he told the president the ship was no longer needed.

Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, commander for U.S. North Command, was asked about the beds that weren’t filled up at facilities like Comfort and the nearby Javits Center.

“We’re not chasing numbers,” he said. “What we did is we were able to meet the demand signal.”

It’s unclear when exactly the hospital ship will leave New York.

“We’re gonna be here as long as we’re needed. Whatever orders come down from a higher authority, we’ll follow,” Amersbach said.

A spokesman for U.S. Northern Command says it’s working with FEMA to figure out next steps.

Source : CBS News York More   

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