Final Nikon Z9 Teaser Promises Zero Blackout, Official Launch Tomorrow

Nikon has published what is likely to be the final teaser for its forthcoming Z9 camera in which the company shows a high-speed, blackout-free shooting experience and gives another look at what appears to be the unannounced 100-400mm lens. Just like the previous three teasers, this fourth video focuses on one major feature while a […]

Final Nikon Z9 Teaser Promises Zero Blackout, Official Launch Tomorrow

Nikon has published what is likely to be the final teaser for its forthcoming Z9 camera in which the company shows a high-speed, blackout-free shooting experience and gives another look at what appears to be the unannounced 100-400mm lens.

Just like the previous three teasers, this fourth video focuses on one major feature while a few understated details hide in the background. The main point of this video apperars to be the Z9’s ability to capture high frame rate burst photos with zero blackout in the viewfinder, a feature originally seen in the Sony Alpha 9 that has been repeated by both the Alpha 1 and the EOS R3. Not to be left out, Nikon appears to be adding it to the Z9.

Also of note is the appearance of a new Z-mount lens, likely the Nikkor 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6. The lens has been featured as attached to the Nikon camera now at least three times now. The first time was in the second Z9 teaser that featured what was designed to be a wildlife photographer. That video’s main purpose was to show off the Z9’s upcoming 8K recording capability, which the video leads the viewer to believe will have no recording limits when shooting at 24 frames per second. The lens was also barely visible in the leaked Nikon India presentation video from earlier this week. In both those cases, and the third in the video above, the lens is not ever explicitly mentioned nor is it the focus.

One last thing that Nikon very likely specifically added is the appearance of water droplets on the lens and Z9 camera. In the first shot of the camera and photographer below, water is only barely visible:

But later on, the droplets are far more pronounced and very likely specifically added to that shot to convey that the Z9 and the lens will be at least somewhat weather-sealed and resistant to dust and water.

Nikon has officially only hinted at a reimagined rear LCD, 8K recording times, impressive autofocus tracking, and now blackout-free shooting. Unofficially, the Z9 will also feature a super-fast 120 frames per second still capture mode and up to 20 frames per second RAW capture. The camera is expected to feature a resolution of somewhere in the range of 45-megapixels.

While full details on the Z9 have not been released, the wait is almost over. Along with this fourth teaser, Nikon USA has published a countdown clock on its website advertising an online event for the camera that notes October 28 at 8 AM ET as the official launch time.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

How to Leverage Lightroom’s New Masking Tools in Your Workflow

Unless you’ve just emerged from a nuclear fallout bunker, you’ve likely already heard about Lightroom’s impressive new masking tools that Adobe announced at their annual Adobe Max conference. In fact, PetaPixel’s Ryan Mense wrote a wonderful hands-on article covering the expanse of these new masking tools. My goal for this workflow video is to approach […]

How to Leverage Lightroom’s New Masking Tools in Your Workflow

Unless you’ve just emerged from a nuclear fallout bunker, you’ve likely already heard about Lightroom’s impressive new masking tools that Adobe announced at their annual Adobe Max conference. In fact, PetaPixel’s Ryan Mense wrote a wonderful hands-on article covering the expanse of these new masking tools.

My goal for this workflow video is to approach these tools from a practical perspective, without getting mired in some of the more technical aspects of these powerful technologies. It’s not that they are not important or worth knowing. I love nerding out about the intersection of AI and photo editing. But, I also understand that there are many photographers who are simply interested in seeing how these new tools work in a way that would be most applicable within their own post-processing workflows.

The Power of AI-Driven Masking

At a high level, the two most important updates to Lightroom’s selective editing are:

  1. The use of AI to intelligently select the sky and subject(s) in your composition and
  2. The way that you can have multiple selections, or masks, interact with each other by using the Add, Subtract, Invert, and Intersect tools.

In my opinion, these two updates are some of the most significant to come to Lightroom since localized edits were introduced back in 2008 with Lightroom v2. At the risk of gushing, I cannot overstate how much flexibility this new local editing workflow offers photographers. Fine-edged selections that used to take several minutes to refine now occur within 1-2 seconds (at least on my M1 Macbook Air). And with the quasi-logic of the Add and Subtract tools, I can further target the specific areas of my photo that I want to selectively edit.

Unsung heroes

It’s important to also bring up a few other notable updates to Lightroom that may have been lost in all the fanfare. Notably, the “New Coke” version of Lightroom finally got the powerful Color, Luminance, and Depth Range masking tools that Lightroom Classic users have enjoyed for a few years now. As a Lightroom CC user, I cannot begin to express how happy I am to have access to these tools.

And as if mobile photo editing hadn’t been impressive enough with Lightroom iOS/Android, just about all of these new masking tools have made their way to this on-the-go platform. Which, when you take a moment to think about, is truly amazing. Imagine being able to make these fine-tuned edits on your phone.

Onto the workflow video!

Ok, enough gushing. I promised you a workflow video and here it is. Again, my goal for this video was to show you some creative ways to leverage these new masking tools to quickly achieve precise edits. In fact, in some of the photos, 100% of my edits were made using local adjustments with these new masking tools.

I am also working on a few add-on videos that showcase how well these tools sync across devices (start on your phone and finish up on your desktop), as well as how to use the Invert and Intersect masking options. I hope this video helps inspire you to try out these amazing new tools.


About the author: Brian Matiash is a professional photographer, videographer, and published author based in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. His passion is to serve other photographers by helping them grow their own visual pursuits. Learn more about Brian by visiting his website, on Instagram, and on YouTube.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.