First Civilian Space Crew Snaps Out-of-This-World Selfie

The SpaceX Inspiration4 space mission was the first-ever orbital spaceflight in which the whole crew was composed of private citizens. While zooming around our planet during the three-day journey, the crew snapped this out-of-this-world selfie that used the Earth as the backdrop. The Inspiration4 space tourism mission launched on September 16th and brought the crew […]

First Civilian Space Crew Snaps Out-of-This-World Selfie

The SpaceX Inspiration4 space mission was the first-ever orbital spaceflight in which the whole crew was composed of private citizens. While zooming around our planet during the three-day journey, the crew snapped this out-of-this-world selfie that used the Earth as the backdrop.

The Inspiration4 space tourism mission launched on September 16th and brought the crew to an orbital altitude of around 364 miles (585km) above the planet. By comparison, the International Space Station (ISS) orbits at around 253 miles (408km), so the Inspiration4 crew had a wider angle of view of the Earth compared to ISS astronauts.

The vantage point and 360-degree cupola were used by the crew throughout the mission to photograph Earth.

Here’s a short video showing mission specialist Chris Sembroski shooting photos from orbit:

Here’s a close-up photo of Sembroski doing his space photography:

Inspiration4 mission Specialist Christopher Sembroski shooting photos from the cupola of the SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience spacecraft. Photo by SpaceX and licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The spacecraft’s cupola was protected by a retractable nosecone during launch and re-entry — this nosecone also contained a special camera that shot photos of the spacecraft during the mission.

The Inspiration4 crew zipped around Earth at about 23 times the speed of sound, circling the globe about once every 90 minutes.

The Inspiration4 mission was also a fundraising campaign for the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to expand childhood cancer research. Over $200 million was raised, including a $50 million contribution by SpaceX founder Elon Musk and a $100 million contribution by billionaire crew member Jared Isaacman, by the time the crew splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean on September 18th.

Many more photos and videos from the flight will presumably be published in the coming days.

“[W]e only had so many ground station passes to transmit video,” Tweets mission commander Jared Isaacman. “NASA and other government users are going to get priority. I suspect a lot of footage will be released shortly. We had quite a few cameras on board.”


Image credits: Header photo by the Inspiration4 crew and licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

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Nikon School to Introduce Live Remote Shooting for Virtual Learning

Nikon has announced that it’ll soon be offering a new virtual photography Nikon School experience called “Live Remote Shooting” that invites photography enthusiasts to learn photography and shoot with Nikon from the comfort of their home. The organization provides courses that cover a wide range of photography aspects, from understanding a camera and lenses, shooting […]

Nikon School to Introduce Live Remote Shooting for Virtual Learning

Nikon has announced that it’ll soon be offering a new virtual photography Nikon School experience called “Live Remote Shooting” that invites photography enthusiasts to learn photography and shoot with Nikon from the comfort of their home.

The organization provides courses that cover a wide range of photography aspects, from understanding a camera and lenses, shooting fashion, landscapes, wildlife, videos, and more. Now, it’s gearing up to expand its educational services to include “Live Remote Shooting,” as first reported by Digital Camera World.

Unlike a traditional workshop, attendees don’t have to travel to a particular location and instead are guided by a Nikon School’s professional trainer via a video call. During this call, the participants can follow the action from the trainer’s point of view, discuss and view the in-camera setup in real-time, and take part by changing camera settings without leaving their desks.

This type of virtual training enables photographers to explore various locations, shoot set-ups, and even different models of equipment — so as long as it is Nikon brand — without the commitment to travel or rent the gear.

Here’s how the Live Remote Shooting system will work: the Nikon School trainer first tethers their camera to a laptop and starts a live stream through a video-hosting platform which enables students to join in. The trainer also shares their screen so that the students can control the tethered camera connected to the laptop.

This allows students to guide the trainer to compose the image while having full manual control over camera settings. Once captured, the images are displayed on the screen. Students can also request particular lenses or cameras, including those that are not yet available in store. After the live shoot has concluded, all captured RAW images are sent to the students so they can post-process them as they wish.

As Nikon leans into virtual education and develops a wide range of online courses, it opens up possibilities for photographers who are not able to travel but still want to enjoy the benefits of interactive learning, led by an experienced trainer.

Here’s a short video introducing Live Remote Shooting workshops:



This new workshop type is set to feature in Nikon School’s event and training line-up starting in October 2021. Nikon School also offers in-person workshops as well as other types of online courses. More information can be found on Nikon School’s website.

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