Fox News Ran Photoshopped Photos of Seattle Protests

Fox News is being slammed for breaching journalism ethics after it published Photoshopped news photos of protests in Seattle. The outlet has pulled the misleading photos and apologized. The Seattle Times first reported on the digitally altered and misleading photos published in Fox News‘ coverage of Seattle’s Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ), where occupation protesters […]

Fox News Ran Photoshopped Photos of Seattle Protests

Fox News is being slammed for breaching journalism ethics after it published Photoshopped news photos of protests in Seattle. The outlet has pulled the misleading photos and apologized.

The first reported on the digitally altered and misleading photos published in Fox News‘ coverage of Seattle’s Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ), where occupation protesters have taken over approximately six city blocks and declared it to be autonomous.

For several hours on Friday, Fox News‘ homepage featured different photos for its coverage of CHAZ. One of them was of a man with a military-style rifle in front of smashed retail storefronts.

Another showed the exact same man standing next to a sign on a barrier at the CHAZ.

A third photo used on the homepage showed a man running through a street with buildings and a car burning, and Seattle is described as “CRAZY TOWN.”

Problem was, the fire photo didn’t show Seattle at all — it was actually photographed back on May 30th, a week before CHAZ was established, in St. Paul, Minnesota.

And the photos of the rifle-carrying man were composites created by combining multiple news photos together.

Embed from Getty Images

Embed from Getty Images

It’s standard practice for photo illustrations to be clearly labeled as such, and they’re generally used for features and opinion rather than straight news reporting.

Getty Images photographer David Ryder, who shot the two photos above, wasn’t happy with how his photos were used.

“It is definitely Photoshopped,” Ryder tells the Seattle Times. “To use a photo out of context in a journalistic setting like that seems unethical.”

Journalism experts also criticized Fox News for running the photos in its coverage of the CHAZ, which has widely been reported to be mostly peaceful.

“I think it’s disgraceful propaganda and terribly misrepresentative of documentary journalism in times like this, when truth-telling and accountability is so important,” photojournalism ethics expert Kenny Irby tells the Times. “There is no attribution. There is no acknowledgment of the montage, and it’s terribly misleading.”

“For a news photo that is supposed to be of the moment, it is completely egregious to manipulate this the way they have done,” NPPA executive editor Akili Ramsess tells the Times. “It’s one thing for their opinion hosts to state whatever opinion they have, but for their online news platform, they have to follow the ethical norms of any news organization.”

After being contacted by the Seattle Times about the photos, Fox News took them down and updated three of its stories with an apology.

“A FoxNews.com home page photo collage which originally accompanied this story included multiple scenes from Seattle’s ‘Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone’ and of wreckage following recent riots,” the editor’s note reads. “The collage did not clearly delineate between these images, and has since been replaced.

“In addition, a recent slideshow depicting scenes from Seattle mistakenly included a picture from St. Paul, Minnesota. Fox News regrets these errors.”

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Sony Product Advisory: These Popular SD Cards Can Corrupt Your Footage

Four days ago, Sony quietly issued a product advisory for three of its SD card product lines that could potentially corrupt your video footage when used. The company will replace these cards for free if your serial number is affected. The notice—first spotted by Dan Carr over at Shuttermuse—refers to three affected products: The regular […]

Sony Product Advisory: These Popular SD Cards Can Corrupt Your Footage

Four days ago, Sony quietly issued a product advisory for three of its SD card product lines that could potentially corrupt your video footage when used. The company will replace these cards for free if your serial number is affected.

The notice—first spotted by Dan Carr over at —refers to three affected products: The regular SF-M cards, the TOUGH SF-M series, and the TOUGH SF-G series. According to the notice, “data on [these cards] may be damaged or data may not be recorded correctly when shooting video on a camera in [the advertised V60/V90] video speed class mode.”

Sony doesn’t offer any further details about the issue with these cards, except to say that they’ll be offering free replacements from June 11th, 2020 through March 31st, 2022, “subject to the limited warranty that accompanied the SD memory card.”

To find out if your card is affected, flip it over and look for a star mark on the bottom left of the card. That mark means your card is not affected, no matter which of the three product lines its part of. If your card doesn’t have this star mark, you can determine whether or not it’s affected by following the guidelines below:

For Regular SF-M Series Cards

Note: only SF-M cards with “V60, R:277MB/s, and W:150MB/s” written on the front are affected.

For SF-M Series TOUGH Cards

For SF-G Series TOUGH Cards

If your card is affected, Sony asks that you call them at 239-768-7669 or reach out using their chat support—don’t contact the retailer—and the company will facilitate a return-and-replace. According to Carr, who already went through the process, you should be ready to provide:

  • SD card model number
  • SD card serial numbers
  • Date of purchase
  • Place of purchase
  • Your shipping and contact details

To learn more about the replacement program, head over to the Sony support website. Sony doesn’t say how many cards are affected by this defect, but the TOUGH line-up is particularly popular with professional photographers, so we expect that this “replacement program” (a voluntary product recall in all but name) will affect a good chunk of our readers.

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