Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib

Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib is melt in your mouth tender and juicy prime rib that is cooked to medium rare perfection and marbled with fat. The seared garlic butter herb crust is incredible! Impress your family with this beautiful cut of meat! When making this prime rib add Garlic Parmesan Green beans with Bacon,…

Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib

Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib is melt in your mouth tender and juicy prime rib that is cooked to medium rare perfection and marbled with fat. The seared garlic butter herb crust is incredible!

Impress your family with this beautiful cut of meat! When making this prime rib add Garlic Parmesan Green beans with Bacon, Dad’s Famous Mashed Potatoes and Perfect Soft and Buttery Rolls for a complete meal.

Best Prime Rib Recipe - How to Cook Prime Rib | The Recipe Critic by Alyssa Rivers

The Best Prime Rib

The holidays wouldn’t be complete without a prime rib roast. Well, I am here to bring you the best prime rib recipe with a few tips and tricks for cooking the perfect tender and juicy meat every single time. You are going to bring your A- game to Christmas dinner with a flavorful and bold beef rib roast that is actually really simple to make!

With these easy to follow steps you will have a perfect Christmas dinner that will be loved by all. Prime rib is top of the line meat that tastes just as AMAZING as it looks. The marbled cut and beautiful bone structure is just what you need to have this slice of heaven on your plate. Cooking this beef does not have to take long. It is best to have a crispy outside and a tender, juicy inside. With this garlic butter herb prime rib recipe you will have the PERFECT decadent dinner this holiday season!

Herb Garlic Butter Prime Rib Ingredients

I always buy my roast with the bone. The butcher at our local grocery store cuts the bone but leaves it partially attached and ties it onto the roast. This makes it easier to carve the meat and the bone creates a rack for the meat to cook on. The best part of this recipe is hands down the garlic herb butter that gets rubbed on the roast before it cooks. I am telling you! It gives it the absolute best flavor. You can never go wrong with garlic, butter, and herbs slathered on meat. Am I right? Just look at that amazing crust!!

  • Prime rib: bone in and tied
  • Butter: softened and will blend well with herbs and seasonings.
  • Garlic: cloves that are minced.
  • Thyme: freshly chopped
  • Oregano: freshly chopped
  • Rosemary: freshly chopped
  • Salt and pepper: to taste!

How to Cook Prime Rib

Preparing your meat is a great way to ensure your cooking time is perfected by having an evenly cooked prime rib. Taking out your roast before cooking will help with this process. Making the garlic butter herb sauce is simple and creates a perfect outside crust while soaking it in internally for a juicy and tender prime rib. This  recipe will be a little piece of heaven on your plate. Enjoy this decadent recipe this holiday season with friends and family!

  • Prepare your meat: Remove the prime rib from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before to bring it to room temperature. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.
  • Mix together garlic butter herb sauce : In a small bowl mix butter, garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, salt and pepper. Rub all of the butter on the outside of your prime rib and plave in a roasting pan or large skillet with the fat side up.
  • Cook prime rib: Cook for 15 minutes and reduce the temperature to 325 degrees. It is about 15 minutes per pound of meat. Bake until it reaches an internal temperature of 110 degrees.
  • Let your meat rest: Remove from oven and let it rest with foil for at least 20 minutes. The temperature will rise to 130 degrees for a medium rare prime rib.

Best Prime Rib Recipe - How to Cook Prime Rib | The Recipe Critic by Alyssa Rivers

What Cut Of Meat Is Best?

A prime rib roast, or standing rib roast, is cut from the back of the upper rib section of the steer, and it usually comprises a total of seven ribs. To make the slow roasted Prime Rib, you’ll need a three-bone rib roast, which can be cut either from the chuck end or the loin end of the rib section.

Here are some tips for choosing the best prime rib meat:

  • You will want a bone in prime rib. On average a 2 to 6 pound prime rib has 2 to 3 bones.
  • When ordering from a butcher, ask to keep the strings on it if possible. This will ensure cooking it evenly and keeps its form while cooking.
  • If possible, ask to have the largest deckle. The deckle is tender and the most flavorful piece of meat.

Cooking Information Per Pound?

The bones create a natural roasting rack for the meat. Cook the roast at a higher temperature of 450 degrees for 15 minutes. Then reduce the temperature to 325 degrees and continue to cook until the thermometer reads 110 degrees. About 15 minutes of cooking time per pound.

Best Prime Rib Recipe right out of the oven - How to Cook Prime Rib | The Recipe Critic by Alyssa Rivers

Why is Prime Rib so Good?

Prime rib has a large eye of meat in the center. This is juicy, tender and marbled with fat. It is so tender because the muscles aren’t heavily used and it stays juicy because of all of the fat. It is extremely flavorful and beefy which contributes to the high price.

Every single thing about this recipe is absolute perfection. This is hands down the most delicious recipe that I have every had in my entire life. That is sure saying something! I have never had more tender meat while carving the roast. It just melts in your mouth and the flavor is unreal. I know that your family will love it just as much as we did. It will be the star at your dinner table this holiday!

Best Prime Rib Recipe - How to Cook Prime Rib | The Recipe Critic by Alyssa Rivers

Tips for Making the Perfect Roast

Melt in your mouth prime rib is just what you need to celebrate the holidays this year! A meat thermometer is always a MUST when cooking any type of meat. This will ensure the perfect prime rib dinner every time. These quick and simple tips will help cooking the best prime rib this year!

  • Using a meat thermometer is the best way to ensure a perfect prime rib every time.
  • Take your prime rib out of the refrigerator for about 30 minutes to let it rest before cooking. This will ensure an even cook time.
  • You can remove the bones before cooking but it is not necessary. The bone in adds to the flavor and helps keep the prime rib tender and juicy.
  • Remove your prime rib out of the oven when it is about 5 degrees lower than your temperature you are wanting. Cover your meat and let it rest. It will slowly cook as it is resting.

Cooking Temperatures

Prime rib can be a little intimidating to make because you are trying to achieve the perfect medium rare temperature. Since prime rib can be a bit pricey, the last thing that you want to do is to over cook it. I have had that happen before and it is awful! I highly recommend using an oven thermometer for this recipe. It makes it easy to quickly check to see if it is getting close to the desired temperature.

The closed oven method can be a great one, but I had a roast over cook because I was too trusting. That is where you roast the meat at a 500 degrees for 5 minutes per pound. Then you leave the oven closed for 2 hours and it slowly cooks. If using this method I highly recommend a thermometer inside of the meat so that you can check on it without opening the oven while it cooks.

  • Rare: 120 to130 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Medium Rare: 130 to 135 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Medium: 135 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Medium Well: 145 to 155 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Well Done: 155 degrees Fahrenheit

Best Prime Rib Recipe Cooking in the Pan - How to Cook Prime Rib Perfectly | The Recipe Critic by Alyssa Rivers

Storing Your Meat

Having left over meat is just another way to enjoy it a little longer! You still have all the tender, juicy flavors are infused into the prime rib. Enjoy another slice of heaven a second time around with these storing ideas.

  • How long does prime rib last in the refrigerator: It can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 5 to 7 days.
  • Can you freeze prime rib: Yes! Let it rest until completely cooled. Once cooled, place in an ziplock freezer bag, letting all the air out. Lay flat in the freezer for 1 month. When ready to warm up, place in the refrigerator over night until thawed.
  • How to reheat prime rib: If frozen, let thaw completely. Place in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes or until it has reached the desire internal temperature. Enjoy!

Prime rib sliced with the pink meat showing.

More Beef Recipes to Enjoy

  • Garlic Herb Butter Beef Tenderloin
  • Slow Cooker Beef Tips
  • BEST EVER Beef Bourguignon
  • One Pot Beef Stroganoff
  • Korean Ground Beef and Rice Bowls
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Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib Recipe

Garlic Butter Herb Prime Rib is melt in your mouth tender and juicy prime rib that is cooked to medium rare perfection and marbled with fat.  The seared garlic butter herb crust is incredible!
Course Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword prime rib, prime rib recipe
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 8 people
Calories 548kcal
Author Alyssa Rivers

Ingredients

  • 2-6 pounds bone prime rib boned and tied
  • 1 cup butter softened
  • 5 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 Tablespoon thyme finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon oregano finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon rosemary finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

Instructions

  • Remove the prime rib from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before to bring it to room temperature. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.
  • In a small bowl mix butter, garlic, thyme, oregano, rosemary, salt and pepper. Rub all of the butter on the outside of your prime rib and place in a roasting pan or large skillet with the fat side up.
  • Cook for 15 minutes and reduce the temperature to 325 degrees. It is about 15 minutes per pound of meat. Bake until it reaches an internal temperature of 110 degrees.
  • Remove from oven and let it rest with foil for at least 20 minutes. The temperature will rise to 130 degrees for a medium rare prime rib.

Video

Notes

Updated on December 5, 2020 
Originally Posted on November 17, 2017

Nutrition

Calories: 548kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 53g | Saturated Fat: 27g | Cholesterol: 130mg | Sodium: 1126mg | Potassium: 278mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 769IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 36mg | Iron: 2mg

 

Source : The Recipe Critic More   

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Chocolate Pie Crust (By Hands or with Food Processor)

This Chocolate Pie Crust, or “Chocolate Pâte Sablée” in French, is a simple twist on a classic Shortcrust Pastry. Perfect tart crust for a Fruity or Chocolate Tart Filling, this Chocolate Shortcrust Pastry is super easy to make by hands or with the food processor with 5 ingredients only! Why we love this recipe I... The post Chocolate Pie Crust (By Hands or with Food Processor) appeared first on A Baking Journey.

Chocolate Pie Crust (By Hands or with Food Processor)

This Chocolate Pie Crust, or “Chocolate Pâte Sablée” in French, is a simple twist on a classic Shortcrust Pastry. Perfect tart crust for a Fruity or Chocolate Tart Filling, this Chocolate Shortcrust Pastry is super easy to make by hands or with the food processor with 5 ingredients only!

Why we love this recipe

I simply love making my own pastries for tarts, pies and quiches. Buying a pre-made crust might be convenient, but for me, their textures and flavours are never as good as homemade ones.

Making your own pastry might seem intimidating if it is your first time but trust me, it is actually much easier than it seems! With a few ingredients only (only 5 here!) and some basic must-follow techniques, you will soon become a pastry expert!

There are many different types of pastries that can suit a variety of tart and pies filling, depending on the texture and flavour you are looking for. From a crispy Sweet Shortcrust Pastry, perfect for a creamy filling to a simple Savoury Shortcrust Pastry used to make quiches, you can really play around and experiment.

But when it comes to a chocolate or berry filling, my go to pastry recipe is this Chocolate Shortcrust Pastry. It is the perfect shell for a Chocolate Cherry Tart or a Baked Chocolate Tart for example!

Ingredients

Chocolate Pastry Ingredients laid over a beige napkin.

This chocolate tart pastry is made from 5 basic ingredients only:

  • Flour: Plain / All-Purpose – always sifted!
  • Icing Sugar: or Powdered, Confectioner’s Sugar. Some recipes call for Caster or White Sugar but I personally love to use Icing Sugar to make pastry. This type of sugar combines much more easily with the rest of the dry ingredients.
  • Cacao Powder: the star of the recipe! Always use Unsweetened Cacao Powder (and not drinking chocolate powder…). It is important to sift Cacao Powder before using it as it tends to get lumps when stored.
  • Butter: Unsalted and very Cold. Try to use a good quality butter when you can – it will really help with flavour and texture!
  • Egg: what is used to bind the pastry for this recipe, and give it some richness. I used a medium-size egg.

You can also customise the chocolate pie crust a little bit by adding some Spices to it! I love adding a pinch on Ground Cinnamon or Cardamom for example. A little bit of Salt is also always a great way to boost flavours.

Side view on the baked crust.

How to make Chocolate Tart Dough

One of the great thing about this Chocolate Tart Shortcrust Pastry is that it can be made in two ways: by hands or with a food processor.

I personally always make my Sablé (shortcrust) Pastries in the food processor unless using a Creaming Method like for my Sweet Shortcrust Pastry. I have found that it gives you the most consistent result without making any mess!

That being said, you can absolutely make this chocolate pie crust by hands if you don’t have a food processor. Using a Pastry Cutter/Blender will help you cut the butter into the dry ingredients but you can also do it fully by hands too.

By Hands

  • Sift the Flour, Cacao Powder and Icing Sugar in a large Bowl. Mix to combine.
  • Add the very cold Butter, cut into small cubes. – photo 1
  • Using your fingers or a Pastry Cutter, cut the Butter into the dry ingredients until you get a fine crumb consistency. If making it fully by hands, rub the butter and the powders together between your fingers and palms to create small crumbs (*) – photo 2
  • Add the Egg, preferably pre-whisked so that it combines more easily with the rest of the ingredients. – photo 3
  • Using your hands, work the dough until it starts to come together. You can do this inside the bowl or transfer on your kitchen bench if easier. Lightly knead it until you can assemble it into a ball that sticks together (see troubleshooting below if too sticky or too dry to combine). – photo 4

(*) You shouldn’t see large lumps of butter anymore, or any dry powders. The largest the crumbs, the flakier the pastry will be.

Process Shot Collage: making the pastry by hands.

With a Food Processor

The second technique uses a food processor. The steps are the same, but the blade of the machine will replace your hands to cut the butter into the powders and mix in the eggs!

  • Place the Flour, Cacao Powder and Icing Sugar in the bowl of your food processor and pulse to combine and remove any lumps.
  • Add the very cold Butter, cut into small cubes. – photo 1
  • Pulse for a few seconds to cut the butter into the dry ingredients. You should get some very fine crumbs and no visible large lumps of butter or dry powders. – photo 2
  • Add the Egg, preferably pre-whisked to combine more easily with the rest of the ingredients. – photo 3
  • Pulse again to combine until the dough turns darker and starts to come together. If you press the crumbs together, they should stick and turn into a ball (see troubleshooting below if too sticky or too dry to combine)– photo 4
Process Shot Collage: making the pastry in the food processor.

Rolling the dough

Now that the chocolate pastry is ready, whether it is made by hands or with the food processor, it is time to bring it together and roll the dough.

  • Press the dough together to assemble it into a large ball and slightly flatten it into a disk using your hands. If a bit sticky, dust a little bit of flour under and over the pastry (*) – photo 5
  • Place the chocolate pie crust pastry between large two sheets of baking paper and roll it into a large circle. The thickness is up to you, I personally roll it to be about 3 mm or 1/8 inch. You can roll it thicker if preferred, but I don’t recommend going thinner. – photo 6
  • Put the rolled pie crust over a large flat tray and place in the fridge to rest and chill for at least 1 hour – or up to 24 hours.
  • After resting in the fridge for at least an hour, remove the baking paper. Cut the edges of the pastry to be slightly larger than the tart ring or pan you will use (the highest the edges of the pan, the largest you will need the pastry to be). – photo 7 & 8

(*) If you have worked the chocolate pie crust pastry a bit too much (thus activated the gluten), you will notice that it is not very flexible and a bit hard. If it is the case, leave the dough to relax for 10 to 15 minutes before trying to roll it.

Process Shot Collage: rolling the pastry.

Lining the Tart Pan

It is finally time to line your tart pan or ring! I personally like to use perforated tart rings for the best results, but you can use any type of pans you’d like: metal, ceramic, glass… You can also use this recipe to make Mini Tarts/Tartlets instead of a large Tart/Pie if you want

Note that before lining the pan, you might need to leave the pastry come back to room temperature for a few minutes so that it is easier to handle. If too cold, the pastry might start to crack – but it can easily be patched up with your fingers.

  • Transfer the pastry inside your Tart Ring or Pan. Gently slide the pastry down the edges of the ring/pan to create a right angle (you want to make sure there are no gaps between the bottom and the sides of the pastry). – photo 9
  • Using a small sharp knife, cut out any excess pastry. The knife needs to be positioned flat and parallel to the tart ring/pan to get straight, flat edges. – photo 10 & 11
  • Adjust the crust if needed by patching any cracks or thiner edges – photo 12
  • Dock the pastry with a fork (which means pricking the bottom of the pastry before baking it, which will let any air trapped under the pastry get out). Then place back in the fridge to rest for another hour at least – or up to 24 hours in advance. Place in the freezer while your oven is preheating when ready to bake.

For the baking, follow the filling recipe if it recommends blind-baking it or not. I would personally advise to blind-bake it for 15 minutes to dry out the bottom of the pastry before filling it.

For this specific tart, I made a Chocolate Ganache Filling which did not require any baking so I fully baked the pastry at 160’C/325’F for about 30 to 40 minutes.

Process Shot Collage: lining the tart pan.

Tips & Troubleshooting

Tips to make pastry:

  • Temperatures are extremely important, whether it is the temperature of the ingredients or the chilling of the pastry before baking it. Pastries always need to be very cold to get the best flakey results.
  • Don’t skip on the recommended resting time. It might seem like a long process, but it is the best way to make sure the pastry does not shrink, moves or collapse in the oven.
  • Use a rolling pin with thickness rings to get a even thickness in the pastry.
  • Roll the pastry between two sheets of baking paper. This is a great tip to avoid having the pastry stick to the rolling pin and to get a nice and even flat pastry.
  • Freeze the pastry for about 15 minutes before baking it. It is the best way to insure the butter is very very cold and the crust does not move or collapse in the oven.

Troubleshooting

  • The pastry is too dry to come together: this might be due to the type (and brand) of flour you used or the size of the egg. Add a little bit of very cold water (be careful with the amount, always start with a few drops and add more if necessary) until the pastry comes together.
  • The chocolate pie crust is very sticky: add a little bit of flour
  • The pastry pulls when I roll it / is hard to roll: you probably worked the dough a little bit too much and activated the gluten. Simply leave the pastry to rest for 15 to 20 minutes to relax the gluten before rolling it again.
  • The pastry cracks when I try to line the pan: you might need to let it come back to room temperature for a few minutes if the pastry is hard coming out of the fridge. Cracks can be patched with your fingers once the butter gets softer.
3 small chocolate tartlets shells stacked.

Recipe FAQs

Can I use Lard or Shortening instead of butter?

I have personally never used lard or shortening to make pastry – I am all about the butter! If you do not want to use butter, I recommend finding a recipe specifically made with another fat as I cannot tell if a substitution will work.

You can read more about the different types of fat used to make pastry here.

Can I make the pastry in advance?

Yes – since the pastry shell needs to rest as much as possible, you actually want to prepare it in advance!

The pastry can be stored in the fridge for 24 hours (or up to 2 days) either in a ball wrapped in plastic, pre-rolled between two sheets of baking paper or already lined in the pie pan.

Can I freeze the pastry?

Yes, pastry does freeze well although I personally prefer to make it fresh. The best way to freeze it is already lined in the tart or pie pan, so that your shell is ready to bake straight away (and does not need to thaw to be rolled or lined).

Do I need to blind-bake it?

It depends on the filling, but as a general rule, I always recommend blind-baking it for about 15 minutes at 160’C/325’F. For a filling that does not require baking, the pie crust will take about 30 to 40 minutes to fully bake.

Chocolate Pastry on a white surface over a sheet of baking paper.

More Basic French Pastry Recipes

  • Vanilla Crème Pâtissière (Pastry Cream)
  • Traditional French Crêpes
  • Choux à la Crème (French Cream Puffs)
  • Almond Cream Filling (Frangipane)
  • How to make Profiteroles
  • Chocolate Pastry Cream
  • Choux au Craquelin

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Chocolate Pie Crust

This Chocolate Pie Crust, or "Chocolate Pâte Sablée" in French, is a simple twist on a classic Shortcrust Pastry. Perfect tart crust for a Fruity or Chocolate Tart Filling, this Chocolate Shortcrust Pastry is super easy to make by hands or with the food processor with 5 ingredients only!
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Diet Vegetarian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Resting Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 55 minutes
Servings 1 Tart Crust
Calories 1982kcal
Author A Baking Journey

Ingredients

  • 225 gr (1 1/2 cup) Plain / All-Purpose Flour
  • 20 gr (2 tablesp.) Unsweetened Cacao Powder
  • 50 gr (1/3 cup + 2 tablesp.) Icing Sugar or Powdered Sugar
  • 1 pinch Salt
  • 120 gr (1/2 cup or 1 stick) Unsalted Butter very cold
  • 1 Egg

Instructions

By Hands

  • Sift the Flour, Cacao Powder and Icing Sugar in a large bowl. Mix to combine.
  • Add the very cold Butter, cut into small cubes. Using your fingers or a pastry cutter/blender, cut the butter into the flour until you get a fine crumbs consistency (see note 1).
  • Add the whisked Egg and work the dough to combine it in until the pastry starts to come together (see note 2). The crumbs should stick together when compressed.

With the Food Processor

  • Place the Flour, Cacao Powder and Icing Sugar in the bowl of your food processor and pulse to combine and remove any lumps.
  • Add the very cold Butter, cut into small cubes and pulse until you get a fine crumbs consistency (see note 1).
  • Add the whisked Egg and pulse to combine until a sticky dough starts to come together. If you press the crumbs together, they should stick.

Rolling & Lining the Pan

  • Bring the pastry together into a ball and gently flatten it into a disk. Dust with a little bit of flour if sticky (see note 3).
  • Place the pastry between two sheets of baking paper and roll it into a large circle that has your preferred thickness (see note 4). Put over a flat tray and place in the fridge to rest for at least an hour, or up to 24 hours in advance.
  • Take the pastry out of the fridge and let it come back to room temperature for 5 minutes. Remove the baking paper sheets and place inside your tart ring or pie pan. Gently slide the pastry along the edges of the pan to create a right angle.
  • Using a small sharp knife, cut out any excess pastry. Dock the bottom of the pastry (prick it with a fork) then place it back in the fridge to rest and chill for at least an hour (or up to 24 hours in advance).

Baking the Pastry

  • Preheat your oven on 160'C/325'F and place the pastry in the freezer while the oven is preheating.
  • Blind bake for 15 minutes or fully bake for 30 to 40 minutes, depending on your choice of filling and the recommendation of the filling recipe.

Notes

Disclaimer: for the best results, I highly recommend using the measurements in grams that are more accurate than the ones in cups/spoons.
Yield: this recipe will make a large amount of pastry that will fit most large tart or pie pans. You can also use it to make about 10 tartlets.
Instruction Notes:
  1. You should not see large lumps of butter anymore or any loose dry powders. The largest the crumbs, the flakier the pastry will be.
  2. You can do it inside the bowl or by gently kneading the pastry on your kitchen bench or flat surface. Try not to over-work the pastry.
  3. If too sticky to roll, add a little bit of flour. If too dry and crumble, add a few drops of very cold water and work it into the dough until you get the desired consistency.
  4. I usually roll the pastry to be about 3 mm – 1/8 inch but you can roll it slightly thicker if preferred. I don’t recommend rolling it thiner or it will become hard to transfer into the tart pan without breaking.

Nutrition

Calories: 1982kcal | Carbohydrates: 234g | Protein: 34g | Fat: 106g | Saturated Fat: 65g | Cholesterol: 422mg | Sodium: 124mg | Potassium: 606mg | Fiber: 13g | Sugar: 50g | Vitamin A: 3236IU | Calcium: 113mg | Iron: 14mg

The post Chocolate Pie Crust (By Hands or with Food Processor) appeared first on A Baking Journey.

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