Gitzo Delays the Legende Tripod Three Months, Compounding Woes

Gitzo’s crowdsourced Legende tripod and backpack series has hit another snag: the company has delayed shipping the product for another three months to address “aesthetic” damage. What’s worse, the company’s poor communication has led to a deluge of dissatisfied comments and demands for refunds. On June 7, Gitzo posted an update to its IndieGoGo campaign […]

Gitzo Delays the Legende Tripod Three Months, Compounding Woes

Gitzo’s crowdsourced Legende tripod and backpack series has hit another snag: the company has delayed shipping the product for another three months to address “aesthetic” damage. What’s worse, the company’s poor communication has led to a deluge of dissatisfied comments and demands for refunds.

On June 7, Gitzo posted an update to its IndieGoGo campaign that informed backers of an issue that would delay the shipment of both the tripod significantly.

“Thanks to your feedbacks we learned that very occasionally, during packing and transportation phases, Légende tripod might suffer minor aesthetic damages on limited product surfaces and on aluminum lock knob,” the company writes. “Albeit this won’t affect any functionality of your tripod, we take all these inquiries very seriously as part of our commitment to deliver premium product to our loyal backers, thus we are implementing a packaging upgrade and some improvements to deliver products in impeccable condition.”

This issue was noticed in review of the Legende tripod and backpack: scuffs and scratches were visible on the tripod right out of the box.

Visible black scuff mark and the frayed rubber on the center shaft twist lock.

“While we implement the new shipping pack, we think it’s best to pause delivery and recall outbound shipments and fix it immediately. This will delay remaining shipments of about 3 months maximum, we appreciate your patience,” Gitzo continues. “As usual, we will update you on country list and tracking number notification and our customer service will always be available to keep you updated about progress and to inform you about your current shipment.”

This delay alone wouldn’t necessarily be cause for alarm, but Gitzo’s poor communication to this point has backers on high alert. Last month, Gitzo suddenly took down all references to the Legende tripod and backpack from its company website, leading backers to assume it had been discontinued before it even shipped. To make matters worse, the company refused to publicly answer why this was happening in comments posted to the IndieGoGo campaign. Instead, a company representative repeatedly responded with the same identical statement:

We are very sorry you missed that. If you’d like to receive further information please write us at gitzoinspires@gitzo.com and will follow more updates on this.

Repeated inquiries by PetaPixel to that email address as well as other points of contact were not answered prior to publication, but three days later, a Gitzo representative finally responded and said the company planned to put the two products back on its website after the campaign backers received their shipments in July.

That timeline is likely to shift as the tripod is delayed until at least September.

Even with this response, backers have been dissatisfied with how Gitzo is handling communication and it has led some to call the campaign a “scam” in a number of concerned emails sent to PetaPixel. The comments on the campaign paint a similar story, with several stating they have decided to recoup their investment by disputing the charge with their banks as Gitzo appears to ignore the requests sent directly to them.

“As others have said, if you send Gitzo an email, you can’t expect a reply,” one backer writes. “They don’t seem to reply to all comments, as you can see from the replies from Gitzo in the comments here. In my case, Gitzo promised that they would inform me of the delivery status by tomorrow, and it’s been several days since then and I still haven’t received any email.”

He continues: “The lack of a proper response, whether it’s a comment here or an email, is probably one of the reasons why Gitzo has lost the trust of so many people.”

Some users have reported that they have received the tripod, but it’s unclear how many Gitzo has actually mailed out. Some who purchased a “super early bird” price tier report that they have not received it, for example. Worse, one user found the tripod listed on a Chinese site for immediate purchase, which led them to question the validity of Gitzo’s claims as to why the tripod is delayed.

In general, many backers believe that their experience has greatly tarnished the brand’s reputation.

Gitzo did not respond to a request for comment.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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Samsung’s 50MP JN1 Camera Sensor Has Industry’s Smallest Pixels

Samsung has announced that it is beginning mass production of what it claims has the smallest pixels in the industry: 0.64μm-pixels. The 50-megapixel sensor is called the ISOCELL JN1 and is equipped with ISOCELL 2.0, Smart-ISO, and “Double Super PDAF.” Smaller pixels usually means lower image quality and the possibility of introducing more noise, but […]

Samsung’s 50MP JN1 Camera Sensor Has Industry’s Smallest Pixels

Samsung has announced that it is beginning mass production of what it claims has the smallest pixels in the industry: 0.64μm-pixels. The 50-megapixel sensor is called the ISOCELL JN1 and is equipped with ISOCELL 2.0, Smart-ISO, and “Double Super PDAF.”

Smaller pixels usually means lower image quality and the possibility of introducing more noise, but Samsung specifically chose to push the JN1 down to 0.64μm-pixels so that it could be smaller and therefore see more widespread use in different applications.

As such, the company claims the JN1 is its most versatile sensor yet as it is compatible with existing 1/2.8-inch products and can be used for front-facing, ultra-wide, or telephoto cameras in addition to standard focal lengths. Basically, this one sensor is capable of being employed in any image capture format on modern smartphones. The goal here is to allow users to take 50-megapixel selfies or group pictures as well as high-resolution 4K front-facing video with high-zoom capability, but not limit manufacturers from only using this sensor in that way.

Because the JN1 uses smaller pixels and is, therefore, a smaller sensor overall, Samsung says an added benefit of its design is that it will reduce the size of camera modules by 10 percent. That’s not a huge amount to cut down a camera bump, but in an age where it generally keeps getting bigger, any progress in the other direction is welcome.

The JN1 takes advantage of several Samsung technologies that the company has announced over the last year including its pixel-binning tech, ISOCELL 2.0, Smart-ISO, and Double Super PDAF.

In low light conditions, Samsung’s JN1 utilizes the company’s four-to-one pixel binning technology — Tetrapixel — which merges four adjacent 0.64μm-pixels into one big 1.28μm-pixel to quadruple light sensitivity for brighter 12.5-megapixel photographs.

Samsung detailed ISOCELL 2.0 technology in early March of this year and explains that the ISOCELL Plus technology that lies at its core adds a physical barrier made from a new material (typically this was done with metal) around each pixel that reduces light crossing between them and affecting nearby pixels, which leads to the ability to produce better color.

Smart-ISO is a Samsung HDR technology that allows its sensors to capture both high and low ISO simultaneously, which the company discussed in detail here. While Samsung also developed what it calls Dual Pixel Pro which splits pixels from corner to corner rather than down the center, the JN1 instead uses Double Super PDAF, which the company says features twice the density of pixels used for phase detection (1/16) than its Super Phase Detection (1/32) which supposedly enables the same autofocus performance in up to 60 percent less light.

The JN1 is currently in mass production, so it is possible that it will make an appearance in new smartphones as early as this fall.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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