Godzilla: Why Rodan Chose Ghidorah's Side In King Of The Monsters

King of the Monsters put Rodan on Ghidorah's side, instead of teaming him up with his old ally, Godzilla. Here's why this decision was made.

Godzilla: Why Rodan Chose Ghidorah's Side In King Of The Monsters

In Godzilla: King of the Monsters, Rodan fought on Ghidorah's side and opposed Godzilla and Mothra - why? Traditionally, Rodan is portrayed as one of Godzilla's most reliable allies, but the MonsterVerse has so far sidestepped this relationship. Rodan doesn't even get to meet Godzilla until the movie's final scene, when all four Titans battle each other in Boston.

In Godzilla: King of the Monsters, the winged Titan emerges from his volcano after being awakened by the movie's villains. Shortly afterward, Rodan finds himself in conflict with King Ghidorah. The two engage in a fierce but brief struggle, with Ghidorah emerging victorious. After the fight, Rodan is seen with Ghidorah, who he has now accepted as the King of the Monsters - contrary to the Orca's call. Later, Rodan helps his new master by stopping Mothra from helping Godzilla. Rodan is badly wounded by Mothra, but he survives the fight to witness Ghidorah's defeat at the hands of Godzilla. Rodan, who is soon joined by Behemoth, Scylla, Methuselah, and the third M.U.T.O., bows down to Godzilla, who has replaced "The False King" as the alpha of the Titans.

Related: Godzilla's MonsterVerse Can Now Introduce Biollante (Because Of Ghidorah)

So why did the movie decide to team Rodan with Ghidorah? Godzilla: King of the Monsters director Mike Dougherty explained during a watch party that having Rodan side with Godzilla was actually their original plan. This idea was abandoned, however, because it was decided that having Godzilla, Rodan, and Mothra gang up on Ghidorah in a 3-on-1 match-up would have been unfair. Also, Doughterty pointed out that this fight has been done before, referring to Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster from 1964, the film that introduced Ghidorah and also the first movie in which Godzilla and Rodan shared the screen. In this movie, Mothra shamed Godzilla and Rodan into helping her drive off Ghidorah.

Rodan also fought alongside Godzilla in Invasion of Astro-Monster, Destroy All Monsters, and he used his life essence to bring Godzilla back from the brink of death in Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II. So over the years, Godzilla and Rodan have evolved into Toho's most iconic giant monster team-up. It's worth noting that before King of the Monsters, Rodan had never willingly helped the main villain.  The only time he wasn't Godzilla's ally was in Godzilla: Final Wars, when he was mind-controlled by aliens.

It was disappointing that their relationship from the classic Toho movies wasn't adapted for Rodan's MonsterVerse debut. It certainly would have been fun to see Rodan swoop in and dive-bomb Ghidorah again, but at the same time, it's true that Rodan fighting Ghidorah would have tipped the scales too much in Godzilla's favor, making the film's final showdown grossly unfair. With Ghidorah being left at a severe disadvantage, the fight would have been understandably less exciting.

As much as fans would love to have seen Godzilla and Rodan fight on the same side, it was simply not to be. But, that doesn't mean it won't happen. Unlike Ghidorah and Mothra, Rodan survived the movie. The film's ending set up a future team-up between the two. That means that if  - or some other MonsterVerse film - he could finally work with Godzilla to defeat the enemy.

More: How Godzilla vs Kong Can Bring Back Mothra, Rodan & Ghidorah

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Remothered: Broken Porcelain Preview - Devoted to Giallo Horror

Video games get the classic Italian Giallo treatment with the new survival horror title, Remothered: Broken Porcelain, the sequel to the 2018 hit.

Remothered: Broken Porcelain Preview - Devoted to Giallo Horror

Following the success of the Italian horror game, Remothered: Tormented Fathers in 2018, the team at Stormind Games is back with a sequel that looks to improve on the original while adding new horror elements and higher production values while expanding the lore of the series. Screen Rant was shown , and came away impressed at the improved visuals and focus on cinematic stealth gameplay. The demo was led by writer/director Chris Darrill and producer Antonio Cutrona, who also answered our questions about the provocative horror game.

Remothered: Broken Porcelain is a sequel to the original, but plot details and possible connections to the original game are being kept secret for now. Darrill promises the return of familiar faces from the original, and teases that the two titles are "undeniably connected." Still, he promises that newcomers will be able to dive right into Broken Porcelain without playing Tormented Fathers, since its story does stand on its own, even with the lore connections expanding the larger story at play between the two games.

Related: Giallo Explained: A History Of The Italian Horror Movies

The original Remothered turned heads with its devotion to Giallo horror, or the particular sensibilities of Italian terror. Darrill cites Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, among others, as influences on him and the game, while also pointing out some influence from Stanley Kubrick's in Broken Porcelain's isolated hotel setting.

Speaking of the isolated setting, Darrill says the mountain location for the Ashmann Inn is based on Mount Etna, a real life Italian mountain located near the studio's home in Catania. Between the distinct horror style and general aesthetic groundings, Remothered is firmly rooted in its developer's national identity.

Remothered: Broken Porcelain sees its young heroine, Jennifer, stalked by the mysterious workers at the hotel, who must be avoided. Fortunately, being discovered doesn't trigger an instant Game Over, and Jennifer has the opportunity to hide, fight back, or otherwise escape from enemies. The demo showed Jennifer injuring an opponent with a bloody stab from a pair of scissors, but the developers stopped short of confirming whether or not she'll be able to kill or indefinitely incapacitate any opponents. Either way, Jen has a lot more movement options than Rosemary from the first game, giving players more tools with which to evade and interact with enemy NPCs.

One of the biggest mysteries of Broken Porcelain is the Moth Eye, a mysterious and seemingly supernatural power that allows Jen to take control of a moth and use the flying insect to explore the environments and even solve puzzles by shorting out electrical devices, presumably sacrificing the moth in the process. The Moth Eye can also be used to highlight enemies, causing an outline of foes to temporarily appear, though it does fade with time.

Visually, Broken Porcelain already looks much better than its predecessor. Jennifer's dress and hair have real physics and are affected by weather and movement, and the animations are noticeably lifelike thanks to an in-house motion capture studio. On all fronts, the graphics of Broken Porcelain mark a true leap over Tormented Fathers. The game won't be mistaken for the cutting-edge RE Engine fueling the modern titles, but it's nevertheless proudly punching above its weight class.

There are surely many mysteries to be discovered in the Ashmann Inn, and our demo only scratched the surface of what Broken Porcelain has to offer. Italian Giallo films have always held a special place in the hearts of die-hard horror fans, and the original Remothered displayed a lot of potential while showing how that genre could translate into video game form. With Remothered: Broken Porcelain, the team looks like they've addressed every criticism of the original game and are striving to make the ultimate Italian video game horror experience for the ages.

More: 10 Must-See Giallo-Style Horror Films

Remothered: Broken Porcelain releases this summer for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC.

Source : Screen Rant More   

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