Hamilton: Not my job to worry about Mercedes PU concerns

Lewis Hamilton says he isn't "giving any energy" to Mercedes' power unit issues despite lingering concerns in the... The post Hamilton: Not my job to worry about Mercedes PU concerns appeared first on F1i.com.

Hamilton: Not my job to worry about Mercedes PU concerns

Lewis Hamilton says he isn't "giving any energy" to Mercedes' power unit issues despite lingering concerns in the Brackley squad's camp.

Hamilton was assigned a new Internal Combustion Engine in Turkey, a fourth element that led to a ten-place gird drop for the Briton at Istanbul Park.

The change came in the wake of Mercedes introducing a fourth engine in Valtteri Bottas' pool of hardware at Monza and subsequent issues impacting customer team Williams, while last weekend, McLaren also fitted Daniel Ricciardo's car with a new engine.

In Turkey, Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff didn't deny the manufacturer's concerns, but insisted that weaknesses had been identified.

''The limits are being pushed and we have seen examples of strange noises in the internal combustion engine," said Wolff.

"At the time we didn't really have an explanation for that and that has caused us problems in the past. We've had engines that simply froze up, now it's more about limiting the problems.

"At this stage it's not possible to change parts, so you can't tackle it that way.

''It has always been very important to find the right balance between a fast engine and one that is reliable, it will continue to be so in the future.

"We won't go into next season with a disadvantage, we know where our weaknesses lie. Now we have to make sure we find solutions to the problems."

©Mercedes

Questioned in Turkey about Mercedes' engine gremlins and the prospect that he may be facing another engine change and grid drop in the remaining races of this season, Hamilton appeared to brush off the concerns.

"I don't really give any energy to it," Hamilton said. "It's not my job to worry about that stuff, so I let the guys focus on that, worry about it.

"My engine is in good condition. My first engine, I think, did six races. We still have engine two, and I think engine three is still there as far as I'm aware.

"Hopefully I don't have to [use a fifth engine], but I can't predict what's up ahead."

  • Read also - Mercedes: Full engine change for Hamilton not beneficial

Wolff confirmed that Hamilton's third engine is still in the Briton's pool of hardware, although Mercedes is mulling if and when it will be re-deployed.

"That’s something we need to assess in the next couple of races," said Wolff. "Because you could decide whether to run it only on Fridays, or also run it on Saturday or Sunday.

"We still have the third engine to help with that but we are not quite sure how far we want to push this engine. It is not necessarily only mileage, it is more about understanding a different reliability topic."

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Vettel: Lack of green relevance puts F1 future at risk

Sebastian Vettel believes that if F1 doesn't become environmentally relevant in the future, the sport will simply fade... The post Vettel: Lack of green relevance puts F1 future at risk appeared first on F1i.com.

Vettel: Lack of green relevance puts F1 future at risk

Sebastian Vettel believes that if F1 doesn't become environmentally relevant in the future, the sport will simply fade into oblivion.

Formula 1 has embarked on a green quest thanks to a number passive and active initiatives, and Vettel, a strong environmental advocate, is attentive to the sport's evolution.

In 2019, F1 announced a plan to have a net-zero carbon footprint by 2030, while its engines have been developed on a hybrid platform since 2014.

The sport's next power unit cycle that is expected to be introduced in 2026 will retain its hybrid component but will rely on bio-fuels to curtail emissions.

But Vettel believes F1's green push isn't enough and embraces a roadmap that won't ensure Grand Prix racing's healthy future.

The four-time world champion is hopeful that innovations to make F1 more sustainable and relevant will appear in the pipeline. But if they don't, the German doubts the sport will survive.

"I think we live in a time where we have innovations and possibilities to arguably make Formula 1 green as well, and not lose any of the spectacle, of the excitement, of the speed, of the challenge, of the passion," said the Aston Martin driver told the media in a wide-ranging interview.

"If anything, we have so many clever people and engineering power here, we could come up with solutions. But the current regulations, I think they're very exciting, the engine is super-efficient, but it's useless.

"It's not going to be an engine formula that you will buy on the road in two years when you decide to buy a new car, for example.

"Therefore, you can argue, what is the relevance? I think there are certain things that people are talking about for the future of the sport in terms of regulations, that could shift the change and shift into more relevant changes.

"And I feel if they come, that's a good thing for Formula 1, and it's also a vital thing.

"But if they don't come, I think I'm not so optimistic. If they don't come, I think that Formula 1 will disappear. And probably rightly so.

"We are at the stage where we know we've done mistakes, and we have no time to keep doing mistakes."

  • Read also: Expanded F1 schedule must be 'sustainable' for personnel - Vettel

Addressing F1's bio-fuel initiative, Vettel was skeptical about the approach, arguing that E10-labeled products are not a "novelty" and that a zero-emission synthetic fuel developed with the engineering support of F1 would prove more effective and useful overall.

"I'm not a specialist exactly on all the fuels, but I will be more of a fan of synthetic fuels rather than biofuels," he said.

"With biofuels, you obviously need to source your carbon from somewhere and I think there might be some problems or some complications there.

"I think it's definitely right that Formula 1 pursues a way to find renewable fuels or a formula for synthetic fuels or usage for synthetic fuels in the future.

"But as it is now, we have an engine in place next year and we're going to have a content of only 10 percent of e-fuels in the car - which from a technology point of view is not a revolution.

"You can already buy that fuel in the pump for several years as a customer around the world. So it's not a novelty.

"I don't think it matches the sort of ambitions that Formula 1 has to be a technological leader. So we react, rather than being proactive and lead the way.

"For synthetic fuels I feel we have the same opportunity. But I am afraid we might react as well, rather than lead the way because the engines will be frozen by '22.

"There is some talk that something might change before, but frozen until at least '25 probably more looking like 2026, so that means another five years of no progress," commented Vettel.

"I think that will put our sport under huge pressure, because I feel in those five years there will be a lot of change hopefully applied around the world, and putting things under pressure that haven't applied any change."

©AstonMartin

Sebastian Vettel believes that if F1 doesn't become environmentally relevant in the future, the sport will simply fade into oblivion.

Formula 1 has embarked on a green quest thanks to a number passive and active initiatives.

In 2019, it announced a plan to have a net-zero carbon footprint by 2030, while its engines have been developed on a hybrid platform since 2014.

The sport's next power unit cycle that is expected to be introduced in 2026 will retain its hybrid component but will rely on bio-fuels to curtail emissions.

But Vettel believes F1's green push isn't enough and embraces a roadmap that won't ensure Grand Prix racing's healthy future.

The four-time world champion is hopeful that innovations to make F1 more sustainable and relevant will appear in the pipeline. But if they don't, the German doubts the sport will survive.

"I think we live in a time where we have innovations and possibilities to arguably make Formula 1 green as well, and not lose any of the spectacle, of the excitement, of the speed, of the challenge, of the passion," said the Aston Martin driver told the media in a wide-ranging interview.

"If anything, we have so many clever people and engineering power here, we could come up with solutions. But the current regulations, I think they're very exciting, the engine is super-efficient, but it's useless.

"It's not going to be an engine formula that you will buy on the road in two years when you decide to buy a new car, for example.

"Therefore, you can argue, what is the relevance? I think there are certain things that people are talking about for the future of the sport in terms of regulations, that could shift the change and shift into more relevant changes.

"And I feel if they come, that's a good thing for Formula 1, and it's also a vital thing.

"But if they don't come, I think I'm not so optimistic. If they don't come, I think that Formula 1 will disappear. And probably rightly so.

"We are at the stage where we know we've done mistakes, and we have no time to keep doing mistakes."

Addressing F1's bio-fuel initiative, Vettel was skeptical about the approach, arguing that E10-labeled products are not a "novelty" and that a zero-emission synthetic fuel developed with the engineering support of F1 would prove more effective and useful overall.

"I'm not a specialist exactly on all the fuels, but I will be more of a fan of synthetic fuels rather than biofuels," he said.

"With biofuels, you obviously need to source your carbon from somewhere and I think there might be some problems or some complications there.

"I think it's definitely right that Formula 1 pursues a way to find renewable fuels or a formula for synthetic fuels or usage for synthetic fuels in the future.

  • Read also: Vettel seeks 'credibility' for green advocacy

"But as it is now, we have an engine in place next year and we're going to have a content of only 10 percent of e-fuels in the car - which from a technology point of view is not a revolution.

"You can already buy that fuel in the pump for several years as a customer around the world. So it's not a novelty.

"I don't think it matches the sort of ambitions that Formula 1 has to be a technological leader. So we react, rather than being proactive and lead the way.

"For synthetic fuels I feel we have the same opportunity. But I am afraid we might react as well, rather than lead the way because the engines will be frozen by '22.

"There is some talk that something might change before, but frozen until at least '25 probably more looking like 2026, so that means another five years of no progress," commented Vettel.

"I think that will put our sport under huge pressure, because I feel in those five years there will be a lot of change hopefully applied around the world, and putting things under pressure that haven't applied any change."

Keep up to date with all the F1 news via and

The post Vettel: Lack of green relevance puts F1 future at risk appeared first on F1i.com.

Source : F1 i More   

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