Here’s how to find best turnip prices ever on ‘Animal Crossing’

Ally Financial is offering Animal Crossing players an unprecedented chance to make big bucks (or bells) flipping root vegetables.

Here’s how to find best turnip prices ever on  ‘Animal Crossing’

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Animal Crossing: New Horizons players for the next few days will be able to sell their turnips, a key commodity in the video game, for the highest price ever.

Animal Crossing is a hugely popular video game, designed by Nintendo and exclusive to the Switch platform, in which players farm, gather items, and build island homesteads. The favorable exchange rate means that some players will be able to turn big profits on their stashes of the digital root, and use them to buy virtual clothes, furniture, and other in-game accessories.

During the promotion, players will be able to collect 1,000 bells for each turnip. Usually, turnips only sell for 15 to 650 bells each.

The deal will only be available on Ally Island, a location in the game sponsored by digital bank Ally Financial. It’s part of a well-known mini-game within Animal Crossing called the Stalk Market that involves buying and selling turnips. The basic goal parallels that of the real-world stock market: Buy low, sell high.

Though their sales, players collect in-game currency called bells, which can be used to upgrade their characters or islands. Players can also use their earnings to pay off the large mortgages they begin the game with.

To access Ally Island and collect those bells, players must get a code from Ally’s landing page at Turnip.exchange. Turnip sales will be offered starting at 9 p.m. ET on Oct. 23, then during daily windows from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET weekdays and noon to 6 p.m. ET on weekends, through Oct. 27.

Ally said it will manage the anticipated queue of players waiting to reach Ally Island. If there’s substantial demand, players could end up waiting for quite a while.

It may seem strange that Ally, a company offering mortgages and corporate lending, is promoting itself through a game that is aimed at children. But the company’s chief marketing officer, Andrea Brimmer, said that many players are in their late thirties.

“We like the idea that we can use it to teach financial literacy,” she told Fortune. “The entire game is about managing your finances well.”

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Source : Fortune More