Homemade Pumpkin Puree

Pumpkin puree that is homemade cannot be beaten! With its fresh taste and amazing texture, once you have tried this you will never go back! It is perfect for all of your fall recipes! I love all things homemade and this recipe is so fun to make! Go ahead and use it in these Mini…

Homemade Pumpkin Puree

Pumpkin puree that is homemade cannot be beaten! With its fresh taste and amazing texture, once you have tried this you will never go back! It is perfect for all of your fall recipes!

I love all things homemade and this recipe is so fun to make! Go ahead and use it in these Mini Pumpkin Pies, this Pumpkin Spice Sheet Cake, and these amazing Pumpkin Scones. They are all SOO good!

Pumpkin puree in a bowl.

Pumpkin Puree

There is always some confusion between pumpkin puree and pumpkin pie filling! People think that you can use them in the same way. But let me tell you what the difference is! Pumpkin pie filling is a pre-made filling that is already mixed with spices and flavoring. You don’t want to use this in recipes because then you will be doubling up on those ingredients and it won’t taste right! Pumpkin puree is pure pumpkin. This is what you see in cans all over at fall time and most pumpkin recipes call for this ingredient!

Do you know how all of the pumpkin recipes are so soft and moist when you eat them? That’s because pumpkin puree has a lot of water content so it helps everything retain that moisture! It is incredibly popular and can be hard to find at the store during the season. That’s why this homemade pumpkin puree recipe is perfect! All you need is a pumpkin. It doesn’t get much easier than that! Plus, your kids will love helping you clean out your pumpkin! Try out the puree in these Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins, Absolutely Perfect Pumpkin Bread, and of course, this classic tried and true Grandma’s Famous Pumpkin Pie.

What Do I Need to Make Homemade Pumpkin Puree?

You need one thing… A pumpkin! Try picking out one that is more flavorful and used for recipes. They will be called a “Sugar Pumpkin.” Just ask for these kinds at the store or pumpkin patch and they will be able to help you find just the right one!

Let’s Make Some Puree!

Making homemade pumpkin puree is not complicated and is actually kind of fun to do! You just need to make sure that you have set aside enough time to roast your pumpkin and you will be all set and ready to go!

  1. Preheat and prep: Preheat the oven to 400° and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Roast: Cut your pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds. (Head to this recipe here to find out how to roast your seeds!) Place cut side down on the baking sheet and roast for 45-60 minutes until it can be easily poked with a fork.. Remove from the oven and allow the pumpkin to cool completely.
  3. Scoop and blend: Use a spoon to remove the softened flesh from the inside of the pumpkin and discard the skin. Press through a potato ricer or use a food processor to blend it up. If you are using a potato ricer you may have to scrape any fibrous pumpkin off the bottom and top of the plate before pressing more through.
  4. Put it in the fridge: Refrigerate pureed pumpkin in an airtight container or freeze in a freezer bag.
6 pictures showing steps on how to roast a pumpkin and scoop out the inside.

Tips for Homemade Pumpkin Puree

Pumpkin puree is easy to make and the taste cannot be beaten by any canned pumpkin! It stores well, so it’s a great item to make from scratch and store in the freezer for the next time a pumpkin craving hits.

  • What kind of pumpkin should I buy to make puree? This part is easy! A pumpkin called a “sugar pumpkin” will work the best for making pumpkin puree! If you use one of these pumpkins then it will help you get a nice thick consistency for your puree. Plus sugar pumpkins have the best flavor!
  • Troubleshooting hard pumpkin: If your pumpkin is fork tender but is still kind of hard when you try to press it through the potato ricer then you can fix that! Try putting the pumpkin in a microwave safe bowl and microwave it on the potato setting before trying to press it through the ricer again.
  • Watery puree: If your puree is watery or you choose to use a pumpkin variety that has a higher water content then you can simmer it on the stovetop. Do this over medium heat so then some of that water evaporates and the puree thickens. 
A close up of pumpkin puree on a spoon.

How to Store Leftovers

You can make this pumpkin puree ahead of time and store it for later! Do this and then you will always have some on hand for all of your fall recipes!

Refrigerator: Store your pumpkin puree in an airtight container and place it in your fridge. It will last about a week.

Freezer: If you want to make extra of this and store it all season then you can freeze it! Go ahead and place it in an airtight container or a large ziplock bag and label it with the date. It can last for up to 3 months! When you are ready to use it then defrost it in your fridge for a day or two.

Soft and Puffy Pumpkin Snickerdoodles

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

Pumpkin Roll Bars

Print

Homemade Pumpkin Puree

Pumpkin puree that is homemade cannot be beat! With its fresh taste and amazing texture, once you have tried this you will never go back! It is perfect for all of your fall recipes! 
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Keyword pumpkin puree
Prep Time 8 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 53 minutes
Servings 1 Will Vary Depending On The Size Of Your Pumpkin
Calories 354kcal
Author Alyssa Rivers

Ingredients

  • 1-2 Pie Pumpkins sometimes called sugar pumpkins

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400° and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Cut your pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds. (Head to this recipe here to find out how to roast your seeds!) Place cut side down on the baking sheet and roast for 45-60 minutes until it can be easily poked with a fork. Remove from the oven and allow the pumpkin to cool completely.
  • Use a spoon to remove the softened flesh from the inside of the pumpkin and discard the skin. Press through a potato ricer or use a food processor to blend it up. If you are using a potato ricer you may have to scrape any fibrous pumpkin off the bottom and top of the plate before pressing more through.
  • Refrigerate pureed pumpkin in an airtight container or freeze in a freezer bag.

Nutrition

Calories: 354kcal | Carbohydrates: 88g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 14mg | Potassium: 4624mg | Fiber: 7g | Sugar: 38g | Vitamin A: 115777IU | Vitamin C: 122mg | Calcium: 286mg | Iron: 11mg
Source : The Recipe Critic More   

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Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs)

These Chouquettes, or little Choux Buns topped with Pearl Sugar, are a traditional French treat you will find in every bakery in France. Perfect for afternoon tea or parties, these sugar puffs pastries can be served on their own or filled with cream. Why we love this recipe Along other delicious desserts like Flan or... Read More The post Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs) appeared first on A Baking Journey.

Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs)

These Chouquettes, or little Choux Buns topped with Pearl Sugar, are a traditional French treat you will find in every bakery in France. Perfect for afternoon tea or parties, these sugar puffs pastries can be served on their own or filled with cream.

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Why we love this recipe

Along other delicious desserts like Flan or Financiers, these Chouquettes are a classic treat you will always find in a French bakery. They are the perfect little bite for afternoon tea ("le goûter" in French): light, airy and slightly crunchy thanks to the pearl sugar topping.

Made from the same classic Choux Pastry dough than Eclairs, Profiteroles, Choux à la Crème or Choux au Craquelin, these Chouquettes are delicious quick and easy to prepare - and even easier to eat. Trust me, you will end up eating at least 5!

Ready in less than an hour, they are a great after school snack (I remember picking up a bag of chouquettes from the local bakery every other day when I was at university) and are also the perfect treat for parties, Holidays or as an edible gift!

What are Chouquettes

Chouquettes (pronounced "shoo-kets") are small choux puffs made from Choux Pastry (Pâte à Choux) topped with Pearl Sugar. They are usually sold at French bakeries plain, but can also be filled with Cream like Whipped Cream, Chantilly Cream or for an even more decadent treat, Pastry Cream or Diplomat Cream (like here).

They are often called the sweet version of Gougères that are little savoury Cheese Puffs made from Choux Pastry and grated cheese.

Ingredients

Ingredients on a white surface.

These Sugar Puffs require the basic ingredients of Choux Pastry with the simple addition of Pearl Sugar.

Although Pearl Sugar is the classic topping for Chouquettes, they are sometimes replaced with mini Chocolate Chips.

I filled these choux buns with a Diplomat Cream, but they can absolutely be served plain without any filling.

3 buns stacked on a small wooden plate with one choux cut in half and filled with cream.

How to make Chouquettes with Pearl Sugar

If you've ever made Choux Pastry before, this chouquette recipe will feel very familiar. That's because making chouquettes is exactly the same as making any other choux pastry recipes!

At this point, the dough is called a "panade" in French.

A good way to dehydrate or dry out the dough as much as possible is to press it against the sides of the pan with a stiff spatula in a rotating movement (you can see the movement in the video found in the recipe card).

You want to make sure that the "panade" gets as dry as possible, which will insure the choux buns rise nicely in the oven.

Process Shot Collage: making the choux pastry on the stove.

To know you have reached the right consistency, poke a finger into the dough and lift it (a little bit of dough should stick to the finger). Turn the finger upside down so that the dough is standing up, then look to see if the dough is slowly falling back down, creating an inverted 'C' shape.

If the dough stands up without falling back at all, you need to add more eggs. If it is too liquid and collapses completely (as opposed to creating a nice 'beak'), you have unfortunately added too much eggs.

Some recipes recommend brushing the cream puffs with an egg wash, but I've personally never found it necessary.

Process Shot Collage: mixing in the eggs, piping the puffs and adding pearl sugar.

Recipe FAQs

Where can I find Pearl Sugar?

Pearl Sugar is basically just small chunks of coarse sugar. You can find pearl sugar online or in speciality shops. Alternatively, you can also make your own pearl sugar from sugar cubes (see tutorial here)!

What if I don't have a Pastry Bag to pipe the Chouquettes?

I have personally never tried the ziplock bag trick to replace a pastry bag. If you don't have a pastry bag, you can also use a small ice cream scoop to shape the chouquettes.

What should I fill the Chouquettes with?

Traditionally they are enjoyed plain, but you can also fill them with basically any cream you want: Whipped Cream, Chantilly Cream, Pastry Cream, Diplomat Cream (used here), or even a Chocolate Pastry Cream or the coffee custard I used inside my Coffee Choux Buns!

How to make sure the Choux Buns don't deflate or collapse?

There are three key elements to make beautiful, puffed choux pastries:
- dry out the dough as much as you can on the stove.
- only add eggs until you reach the desired consistency - even if it is less or more than the recommended quantity.
- bake them for long enough (longer than you think) without opening the oven door, except for once during the baking, and for a second only.

Unbaked chouquette on a baking mat.

Troubleshooting

Side view on the puffs in a grey bowl.

Tips for Success

Storing & Freezing

These Sugar Puffs are best eaten fresh, straight away as they do not keep well for a long time. They should be kept at room temperature otherwise.

If filling with cream, I recommend adding the cream just before serving as it will make the chouquette soggy after a little while. They will also need to be stored in the fridge when filled.

Chouquettes can be frozen - choux pastry does freeze quite well! - but they will be a bit more soggy than when fresh after you thaw them (at room temperature for a few hours). You can re-heat them in the oven for a few minutes so they get a bit more crispy.

One choux sliced in half filled with cream stacked over other chouquettes.

More French Treats

  • Chocolate Orange Tartlets
  • Coffee Financiers
  • Lemon Curd Tartlets
  • Mini Orange Tarts
  • Almond Raspberry Madeleines
  • Mini Chocolate Tarts

Made this recipe? Let us know if you liked it by leaving a comment and rating below! And don't forget to share your creation on Instagram with the hashtag #abakingjourney and tag @a.baking.journey

Recipe

Chouquettes stacked in a grey bowl.
Print

Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs)

These Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs) are Choux Pastry Buns topped with Pearl Sugar. A delicious treat for afternoon tea, a party or as an edible gift for the Holidays!
Course afternoon tea
Cuisine French
Diet Vegetarian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Servings 25
Calories 50kcal
Author A Baking Journey

Ingredients

  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) Water
  • 60 gr (1/4 cup) Unsalted Butter
  • 15 gr (1 tablespoon) Caster Sugar or fine white granulated sugar
  • 75 gr (1/2 cup) Plain / AP Flour
  • 2 Eggs, at room temperature see note below
  • 100 gr (3/4 cup) Pearl Sugar or to taste

Instructions

  • Weight all of your ingredients and pre-whisk the eggs in a small bowl.
  • Preheat your oven on 180'C/350'F. Prepare a large baking tray with a baking mat or paper.
  • Place the Water, Butter and Sugar and a medium size saucepan. Heat up on medium heat until all the butter and sugar has dissolved. 
    125 ml (1/2 cup) Water, 60 gr (1/4 cup) Unsalted Butter, 15 gr (1 tablespoon) Caster Sugar
  • Away from the heat, drop in the sifted Flour at once. Stir with a wooden spoon or stiff spatula until a dough starts to form. Place back on medium heat and keep stirring for a few minutes to dry out the dough as much as possible (see note 1).
    75 gr (1/2 cup) Plain / AP Flour
  • Transfer into the bowl of your mixer (or a mixing bowl if making by hands/with a hand mixer) fitted with the leaf/paddle attachment. Leave to cool down for 10 minutes.
  • Add the whisked eggs a little bit at the time, mixing until the pastry becomes smooth (see note 2). Keep on adding the whisked eggs until you get a soft, supple pastry. You may need more or less egg than recommended (see note 3).
    2 Eggs, at room temperature
  • Tranfer the choux pastry in a pastry bag fitted with a large round piping tip. Pipe small mounds of pastry over the prepared baking tray , leaving some space between each chouquette as they will expand. 
  • Generously sprinkle some pearl sugar over each chouquette.
    100 gr (3/4 cup) Pearl Sugar
  • Bake for 25 minutes, open the oven door for a second to let the steam out then close it off straight away and bake for an additional 10 minutes. The chouquettes should be puffed and golden (see note 4). Leave to cool down completely, then serve straight away.
  • Optionally, fill the chouquettes with your choice of cream or curd.

Video

Notes

General Disclaimer: I highly recommend using the measurements in grams/ml (instead of cups/spoons) for more accuracy and better results.
Ingredients Notes:
  • Eggs: Depending in the size of your eggs, how dry the dough is and the brand of flour you use, you might need a little bit more or less Eggs. Add the eggs a little bit at the time until you get the desired consistency.
  • Pearl Sugar: you can find some online, in speciality shops or make your own by crushing sugar cubes.
Instruction Notes: 
  1. The dough (called "panade" at this points) is ready when you can see a thin skin at the bottom of the saucepan and the dough does not stick to the saucepan anymore. A good way to dry out the dough as much as possible is to press it against the sides of the pan in a rotating movement.
  2. It will look like the dough is splitting every time you add some eggs, it's normal! It will eventually come back together, just keep on mixing.
  3. The exact amount of eggs needed will depend on the brand of flour and how dry the dough got on the stove. To know you've got the right consistency, poke a finger into the dough and lift it (a little bit of dough should stick to the finger). Turn the finger upside down so that the dough is standing up, then look to see if the dough is slowly falling back down, creating an inverted 'C' shape. If the dough stands up without falling back at all, you need to add more eggs. Make sure to add the eggs a little bit at the time to avoid adding too much; you cannot save a choux pastry that has too much eggs and is too liquid.
  4. The exact baking time might vary based on the size of the chouquettes. Make sure not to open the oven door too early or more than once or the chouquettes might collapse.

Nutrition

Calories: 50kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 18mg | Sodium: 6mg | Potassium: 9mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 79IU | Calcium: 3mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Chouquettes (French Sugar Puffs) appeared first on A Baking Journey.

Source : A Baking Journey More   

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