Housing minister to ‘monitor’ rise in landlords asking for rent up front

The government has promised to monitor the impact of landlords charging tenants up to six months’ rent ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Housing minister to ‘monitor’ rise in landlords asking for rent up front | LandlordZONE.

Housing minister to ‘monitor’ rise in landlords asking for rent up front

The government has promised to monitor the impact of landlords charging tenants up to six months’ rent in advance.

MP Tan Dhesi raised the issue in Parliament by asking what plans it had to restrict the number of months’ rent landlords can request upfront and what assessment it had made of the effect on private tenants.

Under-Secretary for Housing, Eddie Hughes, said it was up to landlords and tenants to agree the amount of rent that should be charged and how much should be paid in advance, according to individual circumstances.

He said: “We do not expect it to be the norm that landlords ask for multiple months of rent in advance,” but he added: “We have not assessed the impact…but will continue to monitor this closely.”

, the UK’s largest guarantor service, says landlords need upfront rent as security against international students defaulting on their rent as during the past eight years it has seen thousands of them not even turn up for their tenancy. Group MD Jeremy Robinson (pictured) says the same goes for international working professionals who have no credit history.

He tells LandlordZONE: “Some landlords and letting agents will require a UK tenant to pay rent upfront, more often than not, this is no more than three months’ rent in advance.

“Such UK tenants must have failed a credit check and do not have a UK individual to stand as their guarantor. Companies like Housing Hand can provide a guarantor for both international and UK tenants.”

According to , of the 1750,000 properties it let last year, in 95% of cases, tenants had to provide one month’s rent upfront but of the 9,000 cases where more than one month was required, nearly a quarter asked for six months.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Housing minister to ‘monitor’ rise in landlords asking for rent up front | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

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Activists launch campaign to reverse council’s selective licensing plans

Tenants union Acorn is pushing for a selective licensing scheme in Brighton & Hove, three years after ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Activists launch campaign to reverse council’s selective licensing plans | LandlordZONE.

Activists launch campaign to reverse council’s selective licensing plans

Tenants union Acorn is pushing for a selective licensing scheme in Brighton & Hove, three years after local landlord group iHowz managed to get the Housing Secretary to reject the city’s plans.

Its includes a tongue-in-check competition on social media to see whose rented property has the worst mould while it has also organised a rally in Brighton tomorrow (Saturday 19th June).

Activists say they are escalating efforts to collect evidence of poor housing after the city council reported that recent investigations in four wards – Queen’s Park, St. Peter’s and North Laine, Brunswick and Adelaide and Regency – revealed properties were, “overall found to be in a good condition”.

In 2018, iHowz successfully opposed the council’s plans which would have seen 27,000 rental properties covered by the scheme. Local landlords claimed it was unlawful, unnecessary and not justified by the evidence provided, and would almost certainly lead to rent increases for many private sector tenants in Brighton.

Landlord training

The council has promised to continue collecting evidence and working towards being able to apply for a licensing scheme. However, an iHowz spokesman tells LandlordZONE that together with the council, it implemented a landlord training and accreditation scheme which it believes already goes a long way to meet the charter called for by Acorn.

He adds: “Brighton & Hove, like most local authorities, have seen many budget cuts, but we wonder why Acorn have decided that landlords should be singled out to help top up the missing budget. It is an unfortunate fact that any council bringing in blanket licensing will have the unintended consequence that the cost of licencing will be reflected in rents.”

Acorn has been negotiating with the local authority for more than a year on the issue, and is also calling for an ethical landlords charter to be implemented. Branch secretary Ellen Musgrove (pictured) says its members often report serious issues with landlords that don’t get resolved.

She adds: “If the council can’t find the evidence they need they must be doing something wrong. We have tried to work with the Green administration to improve conditions for renters but the many delays make us question their commitment to standing up to bad landlords in this city.”

Councillor Martin Osborne, lead member for the private sector rented housing, says the desire is there but it is stymied by the thresholds the government has set. “While we do not yet have the evidence we need, we are continuing to collect evidence and work towards being able to apply for such a scheme,” he says.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Activists launch campaign to reverse council’s selective licensing plans | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

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