How Astronomers Use Gravity as the Ultimate Camera Lens

The Hubble Space Telescope has an incredible camera system in its own right, but thanks to a phenomenon called gravitational lensing it can capture images far beyond what human technology and optical science currently allow. As noted by Fstoppers, NASA explains that extreme gravity can create interesting visual effects that can be observed with the […]

How Astronomers Use Gravity as the Ultimate Camera Lens

The Hubble Space Telescope has an incredible camera system in its own right, but thanks to a phenomenon called gravitational lensing it can capture images far beyond what human technology and optical science currently allow.

As noted , NASA explains that extreme gravity can create interesting visual effects that can be observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. Einstein predicted that mass can distort space, and his theory of relativity describes how mass concentrations distort the space around them. A gravitational lens can occur when a huge amount of matter, like a large cluster of galaxies, creates a gravitational field that distorts and magnifies light from distant galaxies that are behind it, but in the same line of sight.

Basically, gravity distorts space in such a way that it makes an “optic” that channels light towards Hubble and gives it the ability to see galaxies that are normally too far away to be studied with current technology and physical telescopes. NASA describes it as akin to looking through a giant magnifying glass.

“As Hubble looks out into these fields of galaxies, we sometimes see clusters of galaxies. These are galaxies that are held nearby each other by their mutual gravity,” Dr. Jennifer Wiseman, NASA’s Senior Project Scientist, says. “These clusters are massive conglomerations. There’s so much mass that they have an actual observable impact on space-time itself.”

Thanks to Hubble, scientists have been able to see distortions in space around clusters of galaxies.

“The way we see that is when light from a background galaxy travels through that cluster of galaxies or around it, due to this gravitational lensing effect,” Wiseman continues.

The photo below is a galaxy cluster called Abell 370 that contains what NASA describes as “an astounding assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity.” This photo is only made possible thanks to gravitational lensing.

Entangled among the galaxies are mysterious-looking arcs of blue light. These are actually distorted images of remote galaxies behind the cluster. These far-flung galaxies are too faint for Hubble to see directly. Instead, the gravity from the cluster acts as a huge lens in space that magnifies and stretches images of background galaxies like a funhouse mirror. | Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz and the HFF Team (STScI)

“More complex gravitational lensing arises in observations of massive clusters of galaxies. While the distribution of matter in a galaxy cluster generally does have a center, it is never circularly symmetric and can be significantly lumpy. Background galaxies are lensed by the cluster and their images often appear as short, thin “lensed arcs” around the outskirts of the cluster,” NASA elaborates.

“When we look at some of these distorted arcs, we can see more detail than we would have ever been able to see without gravitational lensing, nature’s boost,” Wiseman explains.

Wiseman says that gravitational lensing has allowed them to use Hubble in unexpected ways. Basically treating gravity as nature’s magnifying lens, what it can capture teaches them more about distant galaxies in detail they could never have seen without the phenomenon.

“It also to tells us how dark matter is distributed in those clusters because it turns out that most of the mass that’s distorting space and these clusters of galaxies is made of this unseen dark matter, not the visible stars in the galaxies, and we can’t see the dark matter,” Wiseman says. “But by seeing how this background light is distorted, we can kind of map out where that dark matter is.”

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Gorgeous Starlapse Shot From Upcoming Launch Site of Ariane 6 Rocket

Watching any Milky Way timelapse is almost always an awe-inspiring experience, but add in the stellar location of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Ariane 6 rocket launch site and you’ve got a recipe for something truly special. As Digital Trends reports, the agency is currently preparing for the arrival of Europe’s next-generation launch vehicle. The […]

Gorgeous Starlapse Shot From Upcoming Launch Site of Ariane 6 Rocket

Watching any Milky Way timelapse is almost always an awe-inspiring experience, but add in the stellar location of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Ariane 6 rocket launch site and you’ve got a recipe for something truly special.

As reports, the agency is currently preparing for the arrival of Europe’s next-generation launch vehicle. The above starscape-filled timelapse was filmed around the launch base in French Guiana and lets you “imagine yourself stepping out of the launcher assembly building or standing on the launch pad in front of the 90-meter high mobile gantry, to look at the stars.”

The video opens with a breathtaking view of the Milky Way before shifting gears and showing off several of the night scenes around the ESA’s launch site in South America where Europe’s next-generation heavy-lift rocket will soon lift off from. Comprised of two versions, the Ariane 6 is a modular three-stage launcher (Solid-Cryogenic-Crogenic) and is configured with an A62 with two strap-on boosters and an A64 with four boosters. The entire Ariane 6 sits at just over 60 meters tall (196.85 feet), which is just about the same height as SpaceX’s Falcon 9.

The European Space Agency says the new rocket will weigh nearly 900 tons when launched with a full payload that is “roughly equivalent to one-and-a-half Airbus A380 passenger airplanes.” The video below shows what this launch mission should look like once the rocket finally gets started.

According to the ESA, the launch of the Ariane 6 is comprised of three stages: the two or four strap-on boosters, a core stage, and the upper stage. The core stage propels the Ariane 6 for the first 10 minutes of flight where either the two or four boosters will provide additional thrust at liftoff. The upper stage will be powered by the re-ignitable Vinci engine allowing the Ariane 6 to reach a range of orbits on a single mission to deliver more payloads, with the upper stage burning up two or more times to reach the required orbit. Once the payload has been separated, the rocket will burn a final time to deorbit the upper stage to mitigate space debris.

Exploded view

Sitting at the top of the rocket is the 20 meters (65.6 feet) tall and 5.4 meters (17.7 feet) diameter Ariane 6 fairing which will contain the various payloads and protect them from any thermal, acoustic, or aerodynamic stress during the ascent to space. This section has only recently arrived at the launch facility and will undergo a series of tests before its maiden voyage into outer space. While the rocket was initially scheduled to launch back in 2020, multiple delays — including some caused by the global coronavirus pandemic — have caused the mission to be pushed back until the spring of this upcoming year (2022).

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