How the Spike Protein Hurts the Heart

This video from the Front Line doctors White Coat Summit was published in mid-August. In it, pathologist Dr. Ryan Cole succinctly outlines many of the health challenges associated with the experimental genetic therapy injection program. He asks, after thousands of people have died from the injection, where are the autopsies to investigate this investigational program? In July 2021, the U.S. military published a study in JAMA Cardiology1 in which they asked the question if myocarditis was a possible adverse event following a jab with mRNA COVID-19 injection. They identified 23 men who were diagnosed with myocarditis within 4 days of getting the shot. They determined that there was a diagnosis of myocarditis after “vaccination in the absence of other identified causes.”2 And yet, despite finding myocarditis in previously healthy individuals following the shot, the writers only recommended vigilance. The heart problems in 23 military men who had signed up to protect the citizens of the U.S., “should not diminish overall confidence in vaccinations during the current pandemic.”3 As of September 3, 2021, the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS)4 had received 675,591 reports of adverse events following vaccination. Of these, there were 14,506 deaths, 6,422 heart attacks and 5,371 cases of pericarditis or myocarditis. It is important to note that the VAERS has tracked adverse events since 1990. In 2019, there were 605 reports of deaths from all vaccines given. In 2021, there were 14,594 deaths reported in nine months. Although these numbers are significant, a 2010 Harvard study commissioned by the Department of Health and Human Services revealed data demonstrating the VAERS likely only represents approximately 1% of those who are injured.5 In light of these statistics and knowing the new shot program was experimental, December 18, 2020, the Children's Health Defense chairman and chief legal counsel, Robert F. Kennedy Jr, requested the Biden Administration consider establishing a “comprehensive, high integrity system to monitor adverse outcomes following vaccination.”6 In early 2020, many clinicians, scientists and other health experts warned that millions of people may experience potentially permanent or long-term injury or death after the shot. Interestingly, it is the call for greater surveillance of vaccine injury that has, in part, generated censorship from social media platforms through AI surveillance of your posts. Spike Protein Damages Endothelial Cells and Hurts Heart Dr. J. Patrick Whelan is a pediatric rheumatologist who warned the FDA of the microvascular injury the vaccine may cause to the kidneys, brain, liver and heart before it was released to the public. Whelan specializes in treating children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), which is associated with coronavirus infections.7 He did not dispute the potential benefit the vaccine might have to arrest the spread of the virus, but instead cautioned that recipients may experience permanent damage to their microvasculature. At the time, his concern was based on data scientists and doctors were reporting after an infection with COVID-19 affected multiple organs beyond the lungs. In March 2021, a research study was published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.8 However, it is important to note that the study was preprinted online in December 2020,9 before the first vaccine was administered in the U.S.10 This is important, since the study demonstrated that the spike protein associated with SARS-CoV-2 damages endothelial function.11 In other words, before the emergency use authorization jab that injected instructions to create the spike protein was first administered, the CDC, FDA and NIAID were well aware the spike protein was likely causing damage to the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system. This information was not discussed in the media and not considered by the FDA, and it continues to be buried as government agencies push for 100% vaccination in the U.S. In the study, the researchers created a pseudo-virus12 that contained the spike protein but did not contain the virus. Using an animal model, they showed that the virus was not necessary to create damage and inflammation.13 When the S protein attached to the ACE2 receptor it disrupted signaling to the mitochondria and caused damage and fragmentation. The alterations in mitochondrial function were confirmed as part of the inhibition of ACE2 signaling in the lab. The results also revealed that the virus could induce endothelial cell inflammation and endotheliitis. The protein reportedly decreased ACE2 levels and impaired nitric oxide bioavailability.14 Co-senior scientist of the study, Uri Manor, explained in a press release from Salk Institute:15 “If you remove the replicating capabilities of the virus, it still has a major damaging effect on the vascular cells, simply by virtue of its ability to bi

How the Spike Protein Hurts the Heart

This video from the Front Line doctors White Coat Summit was published in mid-August. In it, pathologist Dr. Ryan Cole succinctly outlines many of the health challenges associated with the experimental genetic therapy injection program. He asks, after thousands of people have died from the injection, where are the autopsies to investigate this investigational program?

In July 2021, the U.S. military published a study in JAMA Cardiology1 in which they asked the question if myocarditis was a possible adverse event following a jab with mRNA COVID-19 injection. They identified 23 men who were diagnosed with myocarditis within 4 days of getting the shot. They determined that there was a diagnosis of myocarditis after “vaccination in the absence of other identified causes.”2

And yet, despite finding myocarditis in previously healthy individuals following the shot, the writers only recommended vigilance. The heart problems in 23 military men who had signed up to protect the citizens of the U.S., “should not diminish overall confidence in vaccinations during the current pandemic.”3

As of September 3, 2021, the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS)4 had received 675,591 reports of adverse events following vaccination. Of these, there were 14,506 deaths, 6,422 heart attacks and 5,371 cases of pericarditis or myocarditis.

It is important to note that the VAERS has tracked adverse events since 1990. In 2019, there were 605 reports of deaths from all vaccines given. In 2021, there were 14,594 deaths reported in nine months.

Although these numbers are significant, a 2010 Harvard study commissioned by the Department of Health and Human Services revealed data demonstrating the VAERS likely only represents approximately 1% of those who are injured.5

In light of these statistics and knowing the new shot program was experimental, December 18, 2020, the Children's Health Defense chairman and chief legal counsel, Robert F. Kennedy Jr, requested the Biden Administration consider establishing a “comprehensive, high integrity system to monitor adverse outcomes following vaccination.”6

In early 2020, many clinicians, scientists and other health experts warned that millions of people may experience potentially permanent or long-term injury or death after the shot. Interestingly, it is the call for greater surveillance of vaccine injury that has, in part, generated censorship from social media platforms through AI surveillance of your posts.

Spike Protein Damages Endothelial Cells and Hurts Heart

Dr. J. Patrick Whelan is a pediatric rheumatologist who warned the FDA of the microvascular injury the vaccine may cause to the kidneys, brain, liver and heart before it was released to the public. Whelan specializes in treating children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C), which is associated with coronavirus infections.7

He did not dispute the potential benefit the vaccine might have to arrest the spread of the virus, but instead cautioned that recipients may experience permanent damage to their microvasculature. At the time, his concern was based on data scientists and doctors were reporting after an infection with COVID-19 affected multiple organs beyond the lungs.

In March 2021, a research study was published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.8 However, it is important to note that the study was preprinted online in December 2020,9 before the first vaccine was administered in the U.S.10

This is important, since the study demonstrated that the spike protein associated with SARS-CoV-2 damages endothelial function.11 In other words, before the emergency use authorization jab that injected instructions to create the spike protein was first administered, the CDC, FDA and NIAID were well aware the spike protein was likely causing damage to the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system.

This information was not discussed in the media and not considered by the FDA, and it continues to be buried as government agencies push for 100% vaccination in the U.S. In the study, the researchers created a pseudo-virus12 that contained the spike protein but did not contain the virus. Using an animal model, they showed that the virus was not necessary to create damage and inflammation.13

When the S protein attached to the ACE2 receptor it disrupted signaling to the mitochondria and caused damage and fragmentation. The alterations in mitochondrial function were confirmed as part of the inhibition of ACE2 signaling in the lab.

The results also revealed that the virus could induce endothelial cell inflammation and endotheliitis. The protein reportedly decreased ACE2 levels and impaired nitric oxide bioavailability.14 Co-senior scientist of the study, Uri Manor, explained in a press release from Salk Institute:15

“If you remove the replicating capabilities of the virus, it still has a major damaging effect on the vascular cells, simply by virtue of its ability to bind to this ACE2 receptor, the S protein receptor, now famous thanks to COVID. Further studies with mutant spike proteins will also provide new insight towards the infectivity and severity of mutant SARS CoV-2 viruses.”

Further Study Demonstrates the Effect of the Spike Protein

Then, a second paper16 was published online March 8, 2021, investigated the potential that the spike protein is an inflammagen, or an irritant that can trigger inflammation at the cellular level. The researchers sought to determine if the spike protein was the underlying cause of the hypercoagulation found with a COVID-19 infection.

Mass spectrometry showed the spike protein damaged fibrinogen, prothrombin and complement 3, all compounds used in coagulation. They suggested that the presence of the protein was contributing to hypercoagulation and may result in large microclots that have been observed in plasma samples from patients infected with COVID-19.

Again, science demonstrated that it wasn't the virus causing endothelial damage that led to organ damage, such as was found in the heart, liver and kidney of COVID-19 patients. Rather, it was the spike protein that was also being injected in a genetic therapy shot program.

A third study published April 27, 2021, again demonstrated in an animal model that exposure to the spike protein alone was enough to induce severe lung damage.17 And yet, there was no move by governmental agencies to slow the distribution of this genetic experiment.

Researchers have continued to study how the spike protein affects the endothelial cells, and ultimately damages the heart muscle. A study published June 2021 in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine18 demonstrated that the spike protein down regulates the expression of junctional proteins found in the arteries. They concluded:

“... these experiments reveal that Spike-induced degradation of endothelial junctional proteins affects endothelial barrier function and is the likely cause of vascular damage observed in COVID-19 affected individuals.”

Even as researchers identify the pathway the spike protein takes to damage the endothelial cells, it is patently ignored by the mainstream media, governmental agencies and many health experts who continue to push the public into vaccinating with a genetic therapy injection that does not effectively keep you from getting the disease or stop you from spreading the disease.

Infection Starts and May Stay in the Lungs

Interestingly, another study19 published in March 2021 questioned if the prevalence of inflammatory heart disease after COVID-19 infection in professional athletes would affect their ability to return to play.

The researchers evaluated 789 professional athletes who had COVID-19 and found no adverse cardiac events in those who underwent cardiac screening. In this group of healthy individuals, it appeared very rare for there to be systemic involvement of the spike protein.

However, in the VAERS reports September 3, 2021, there were a total of 11,793 individuals who suffered heart attack, myocarditis or pericarditis in the nine months that the vaccine had been administered.20 The effect of COVID-19 on the heart is well documented.21

In my interview with Dr. Vladimir Zelenko22 in February 2021, we discussed the treatment of COVID-19 with hydroxychloroquine. At that point, Zelenko had treated 3,000 patients with symptoms of COVID-19 and only three of his high-risk patients had subsequently succumbed to the disease.

While the focus of the interview was on treatment protocols and the use of the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine, Zelenko shared an interesting statistic about his protocol. In the early months of COVID-19, Zelenko decided to treat his high-risk patients as early as possible, without waiting for severe symptoms. This turned out to be one key to his significant success.

His understanding of the mechanism behind hydroxychloroquine and zinc led to using the combination alongside azithromycin, to prevent bacterial pneumonia and other bacterial infections common with COVID.

What is interesting are the statistics for Zelenko’s patients with long haul symptoms. Data from the University of Washington in 2021 found 32.7% of outpatients with COVID-19 go on to experience persistent symptoms.23,24 However, Zelenko had treated 3,000 patients and none who received treatment within the first five days went on to develop long-haul symptoms. His data was from the same period as that of the University of Washington.

While he has had patients with persistent symptoms from COVID-19, they sought medical care after the first five days of symptoms, which meant the inflammatory process had advanced. From his experience, and the experience of the patients he treated, early intervention with the protocol nearly eliminated the risk of persistent symptoms.

Long Haul Symptoms May Be Related to Spike Damage

The symptoms that may last for weeks or months after a COVID-19 infection are referred to as long-haul symptoms. For some, this may be the result of vascular damage caused by the spike protein. The CDC25 reports that a combination of the following symptoms without an active COVID infection can appear weeks after the infection and last for months.

Brain fog described as difficulty thinking or concentrating

Chest pain

Cough and difficulty breathing

Depression or anxiety

Dizziness when first standing

Fast beating heart or pounding heart

Fatigue

Fever

Headache

Joint or muscle pain

Loss of smell or taste

Shortness of breath

Scientists now know that the predominant pathophysiology of COVID-19 includes endothelial damage and microvascular injury, stimulation of hyperinflammation and hypercoagulability.26 A review in Physiological Reports27 examined how the capillary damage and inflammation from endotheliitis triggered by COVID-19 could contribute to the persistent symptoms by interfering with tissue oxygenation.

The combined effects of capillary damage in multiple key organs may accelerate hypoxia-related inflammation and lead to long-haul symptoms. Unlike Zelenko’s patients who did not have long-haul symptoms, participants in an online survey published in EClinical Medicine did not fare so well.28

The study revealed data from 3,762 participants with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 in 56 countries. For the majority, it took greater than 35 weeks to recover from all their symptoms. The data showed that people experienced an average of 55.9 symptoms across 9.1 organ systems. The most frequent symptoms six months after infection were cognitive dysfunction, fatigue and post-exertional malaise.

List of Vaccine Side Effects Is Growing

As the list of people reporting adverse events after the vaccine continues to grow, social media platforms are working just as hard to suppress any information about the list of side effects people are experiencing.

In order to tell their stories, people are posting videos, still photos and evidence of their vaccine injury at No More Silence29 and 1000 COVID Stories.30 One example is Sarah Green, a 16-year-old student who is experiencing debilitating symptoms. This is her story as told by her mother:31

“Within a few weeks, she developed a bad stutter and started experiencing uncontrollable head movements. She looked like someone who has Parkinson’s. She had never stuttered or had these tics before.

She was admitted to the hospital where she spent two nights and underwent numerous tests, before being discharged and told that it was a 'nervous tic,' and to see a mental health provider.

'We asked several times if it could be the vaccine and we were ignored, until one doctor told us that he had no idea what it was, but it was ‘absolutely not the vaccine’ and we couldn’t blame everything on that.'

Her parents argued for a referral to see a neurologist, who diagnosed Sarah with Functional Movement Disorder, and told that it was “related to the vaccine, but not vaccine related.” They also said that it was an ‘extremely rare’ side effect, despite having seen several cases of it in their own practice over the past year.

Sarah had ended the last school year with a 4.7 GPA and was enrolled in an Early College program, on track to graduate with an Associates Degree. Given her current physical condition and limitations, she had no choice but to drop her college classes for this upcoming semester.

She has started her regular classes but has found it impossible to look down or write without triggering violent tremors and spasms. Her teacher will be typing her notes for her.

'I am heartbroken because she has worked so hard and everything has changed for her — and I’m so damn mad! Our whole lives have changed, and for what what? A vaccine that doesn’t even work! My hope is that you, the reader, will be able to make an informed decision when deciding whether you get the vaccine or not. We were not afforded that opportunity.'”

It is crucial to report a vaccine injury or side effect to VAERS, as the data are essential in helping individuals, doctors and researchers make informed decisions. You can make your own report online or using a PDF by going to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.32 You’ll find more information about adverse events and how vaccines affect your health at the National Vaccine Information Center.33

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The truth about adrenal fatigue.

You deserve to feel better. The post The truth about adrenal fatigue. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

The truth about adrenal fatigue.

Reviewed by Helen Kollias, PhD


| | |

Every month, roughly 80,000 people type “what is adrenal fatigue?” into a search bar, hoping for answers.

And the internet gives them plenty. (About 17 million, give or take.)

Click on any number of these offerings and you can read a super-convincing theory about how adrenal fatigue works.

That line of reasoning goes like this:

Prolonged stress or illness overworks your adrenal glands. Eventually, your glands fatigue, and sleep disruptions, cravings, brain fog, exhaustion, and other symptoms set in.

According to certain people on the interwebz, expensive supplements, restrictive eat-this-not-that diet lists, and essential oil blends can turn this sad state of affairs around.

If you’re desperate for help, this adrenal-fatigue theory can seem like manna from Heaven.

Except it’s not true, as we’ll explain below.

Unfortunately this misinformation prevents people from understanding what’s really going on.

In this article, we’ll help you sort the facts from the fiction. By the end, you’ll know the real cause of these symptoms—as well as evidence-based strategies that actually work.

What is adrenal fatigue?

To fully understand adrenal fatigue theory, you need a quick anatomy lesson.

At the top of each of your kidneys, you have an adrenal gland that releases an array of hormones. One of those hormones, cortisol, gets you out of bed, regulates blood pressure, and snaps you to attention during an emergency, among other things.

According to adrenal-fatigue theory, too much stress causes the adrenals to stop functioning properly.

They either don’t generate enough cortisol, or they produce it at the wrong times (like when you’re trying to sleep).

This then leads to symptoms like:

  • feeling tired and lethargic
  • poor healing and recovery
  • aches and pains
  • having salt or sugar cravings
  • having trouble falling asleep or waking up
  • relying on caffeine to get through the day

Those are all real problems. We’re guessing you’ve experienced one (or all) of them. Or you know someone who has. (Because why else would you be reading this story?)

Is adrenal fatigue real?

The truth: There isn’t much evidence in favor of the adrenal fatigue theory.

But there is quite a bit of evidence that refutes it.

After carefully examining 58 different studies, researchers from Brazil found that, in most people tested for adrenal fatigue, cortisol levels were… normal. In other words, their adrenal glands were anything but depleted.1

They concluded: “Adrenal fatigue does not exist.” (Pretty clear where these scientists stand!)

Sure, if you dig around PubMed long enough, you’ll find a few studies that claim to support the adrenal fatigue theory.

Those studies tend to measure fatigue levels—rather than actual adrenal function. In other words, they show that fatigue exists, but not necessarily adrenal fatigue.

So why do so many people swear that adrenal fatigue exists?

That’s probably because their so-called adrenal fatigue symptoms are very real, common—and frustrating.

Tiredness is one of the top reasons people seek medical care. It plagues a lot of folks.2

For most of those people, stress—and not adrenal fatigue—is the more likely problem. (More about this below).

Yet there’s no easy medical test for stress.

There are, however, a wide range of tests for the dozens of complex medical conditions that can also lead to fatigue, including thyroid issues, sleep apnea, and anemia.

This can leave people in a situation where they continually tell their doctors about how crummy they feel.

So their doctors order more tests that reveal nothing out of the ordinary, which can make patients feel unheard and misunderstood.

When someone’s not getting the answers they need, adrenal fatigue theory becomes super attractive.

Adrenal insufficiency

Many people confuse adrenal fatigue with adrenal insufficiency (AI).

However…

Adrenal insufficiency is a recognized medical diagnosis.3

In AI, the adrenal glands don’t produce their full roster of hormones.

This includes cortisol as well as aldosterone (which regulates salt and water balance), DHEA (a “master” hormone necessary for testosterone and estrogen production), plus others.

AI can result from Addison’s disease, a condition where the adrenal glands are physically damaged, often due to an autoimmune reaction where the body attacks its own healthy tissue.

Or, it can result from hormonal signalling problems. Meaning, the hormonal signals from the pituitary or hypothalamus aren’t communicating properly with the adrenal glands.4, 5

The symptoms of AI are typically more severe than those proposed in “adrenal fatigue.”

They include:

  • weight loss and loss of appetite
  • significant joint pain
  • stomach pain and upset
  • dry skin
  • disrupted electrolytes (like sodium and calcium)
  • low blood pressure
  • major fatigue
  • hyperpigmentation (darkened areas of skin)

Adrenal insufficiency can only be diagnosed and treated by a medical doctor.

Stress: The real reason you feel so awful

Here’s what the proponents of adrenal fatigue get right: Stress is a real problem—for a lot of people.

Chronic stress doesn’t just affect the adrenal glands.

Our stress response is a whole-body experience, affecting the nervous, digestive, and immune systems, among many other parts of the body.

Short bouts of stress followed by adequate recovery are no big deal. In fact, that’s how we grow stronger.

If that stress is ongoing and there’s not enough recovery, however, the body starts to break down.

Consider what might happen if you hoisted heavy dumbbells… forever. You wouldn’t get stronger; you’d get weaker.

And that’s what happens when you’re under unrelenting stress, even low-level stress. Chronic stress without respite feels terrible, head-to-toe, as the graphic below shows.

Graphical depiction of a human body with text pointing to various areas. According to the text, stress can tighten muscles, intensify pain, intensify heartburn, make workouts feel impossible, induce forgetfulness and brain fog, increase colds and flu, and boost cravings and hunger.

If you’re experiencing these symptoms, check with your doctor to rule out any medical conditions.

If you leave with a clean bill of health, you may be suffering from the consequences of unrelenting stress, without adequate recovery. Luckily, simple, accessible practices can help.

Reduce stress that’s within your control.

It’s not realistic (or even ideal) to obliterate all stress. But you can turn some stressors down a few notches. Your first step: Identify your areas of stress, using the Stress Web, below, as a guide.

Consider your stress level for each area of the web.

To make this easy, you might download and print out the web so you can color in the areas based on how much stress they deliver.

Let’s say you’re training hard in the gym several days a week. Then you might color in all four sections of the physical part of the circle.

On the other hand, maybe you’re not dealing with any of the financial stressors. In that case, you might not color any of those in.

Once you see which areas pose the most stress, brainstorm ways to reduce those areas of stress.

And know that it’s not always about the big things.

For example, our client, Zahra, noticed that her environmental and mental dimensions of the stress web were particularly high.

After some thought, she made a couple changes. She:

▶ bought noise-cancelling headphones to drown out her household

▶ installed apps on her computer to block certain websites during periods of the day

Those strategies allowed her to cut down on unproductive distractions and focus on her work tasks.

After a month, Zahra was feeling more clear-headed, and actually started enjoying her workday more. Plus, she had way more energy. She hadn’t realized how depleting all those competing distractions had been.

Jack up recovery, in multiple areas of your life.

The more stress we deal with, the more we need to prioritize recovery.

Think of your “mojo reserve” as a jug: Stress drains it, and recovery fills it back up.

Try to fill your jug at least as much as you drain it.

Graphical depiction of a faucet, showing that recovery practices (good nutrition, regular sleep, gentle movement, fulfilling activity, social connections, positive emotions, time in nature, mindfulness) turn on the tap. Stress (poor nutrition, low energy intake, intense exercise, work stress, relationship stress, caregiving, financial stress, loneliness, illness) increase what's leaking out.

Recovery can take many forms. In working with over 100,000 clients, however, we’ve noticed that the following three practices offer an enormous impact.

Eat a nutrient-packed diet

Consume enough calories to support your body and activity levels, with a balance of macronutrients (including carbs!).

Bonus points if you can eat slowly and mindfully. (Here’s why slow eating is way better than dieting: )

For more specific recommendations check out our . Plug in some basic info, and it’ll give you a personalized nutrition plan based on YOUR body, lifestyle, and goals.

Get appropriate levels of exercise

If your intense spin or CrossFit sessions feel more like they’re breaking you down than building you up, lower the intensity and/or duration.

Schedule in recovery days, and consider replacing some of your more intense training sessions with gentle, restorative movement that activates the parasympathetic “calming” nervous system. Think: yoga, tai chi, walks in nature (or “forest-bathing” if you prefer!), stretching, and foam rolling.

Form good sleep habits

While we can’t force ourselves to fall asleep on cue, we do have a lot of control over our sleep hygiene—the habits and routines we engage in around sleep.

Experiment with the following strategies and see what works for you:

  • Power down devices 30 minutes before bed
  • Use a journal to write down thoughts, worries, and reminders before turning off the lights
  • Turn down the thermostat a degree or two
  • Take a hot shower or bath before bed
  • Sleep alone, so you’re not disturbed by your partner or pets

Remember, “experiment” means to try it. Any individual practice may or may not be useful. But you won’t ever really know unless you make a concerted effort to give it a shot.

You can always decide to stop doing it if it doesn’t make a difference. In fact, at PN, when we make a change or try something new, we like to say, “It’s forever for now.”

Adopting this “nothing has to be permanent” mindset might help you (or your clients) be more open to experimentation.

(For a visual guide on how to engineer your life for better sleep, check out: ).

You can build stress muscles.

When you face stressful events—with a strong mindset, relationships, and recovery practices—you grow stronger.

If you’ve been stuck in a downward spiral, small improvements can give you some much needed energy, and hope for a better future.

Eventually, stress can feel like surfing: Challenging and dynamic, without pulling you under.

References

Click here to view the information sources referenced in this article.

1. Cadegiani FA, Kater CE. Adrenal fatigue does not exist: a systematic review. BMC Endocr Disord. 2016 Aug 24;16(1):48.

2. Stadje R, Dornieden K, Baum E, Becker A, Biroga T, Bösner S, et al. The differential diagnosis of tiredness: a systematic review. BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Oct 20;17(1):147.

3. Bornstein SR, Allolio B, Arlt W, Barthel A, Don-Wauchope A, Hammer GD, et al. Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Feb;101(2):364–89.

4. Charmandari E, Nicolaides NC, Chrousos GP. Adrenal insufficiency. Lancet. 2014 Jun 21;383(9935):2152–67.

5. Husebye ES, Allolio B, Arlt W, Badenhoop K, Bensing S, Betterle C, et al. Consensus statement on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with primary adrenal insufficiency. J Intern Med. 2014 Feb;275(2):104–15.

If you’re a health and fitness coach…

Learning how to help clients manage stress, build resilience, and optimize sleep and recovery can be deeply transformative—for both of you.

It helps clients get “unstuck” and makes everything else easier—whether they want to eat better, move more, lose weight, or reclaim their
health.

And for coaches: It gives you a rarified skill that will set you apart as an elite change maker.

PN’s brand-new certification—announcement coming soon!—will show you how.

Want to know more?

The post The truth about adrenal fatigue. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Source : Precision Nutrition More   

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