How to stop a panic attack

You can have a panic attack anywhere, at any place and at no specific time. Read more: How to stop a panic attack

How to stop a panic attack

You can have a panic attack anywhere, at any place and at no specific time.

Approximately 13% of people suffer from panic attacks in their lifetime. With high chances of recurring attacks after the initial attack. Panic attacks can negatively affect the quality of life. With people fearing an attack.

Panic attacks can last anywhere from minutes to hours. They also take a heavy toll on the body. If you have been suffering from panic attacks, you can learn these tips to stop panic attacks.

Learn about your triggers

Some people have specific places such as enclosed spaces or objects such as sharp blades that can trigger a panic attack. Avoiding these triggers can reduce the number and intensity of panic attacks.

Knowing if you are having a panic attack

Prevention is better than cure. We all know that to be true. Knowing when the signs of a coming panic attack and stopping it in the track.

Feeling your heart pounding, a sudden surge of fear, sweating, breathlessness, chest pain, trembling in your hands, and dizziness. These are physical signs often present before a panic attack. Recognizing these signs can help you stop panic attacks.

Find a peaceful spot

If you feel a panic attack starting, find a peaceful spot around you. Being in the middle of a crowd or near a busy place might overstimulate you and can also be dangerous if loss of consciousness occurs near stairs or moving traffic.

Sitting or being in a quiet place will help you focus and calm down your feelings.

Diverting your focus

Focusing on a physical object can pull you out from sinking deeper into a panic attack. The sensation of touch can override other stimuli in the environment. This helps ground you and directs your focus to the object. How it feels on touch, its shape and texture all such aspects can break through the storm of thoughts inside your head.

Keeping a familiar object that helps you calm down. It can help stop panic attacks in future. The object can be a small ball, toy, stone or piece of jewellery.

Playing a game

A novel therapy to stop panic attacks has been studied. The approach uses a cellphone to play a chess game. This has helped stop panic attacks in several people in the study. Playing a game of chess with the right level of difficulty before or during the panic attack, can reduce the intensity of the attack. Regular use of this method may help cure the condition.

Practice deep breathing

Deep breathing techniques can help stop a panic attack. Breathlessness usually occurs before and during a panic attack because of rapid breathing. Rapid breathing for longer durations can heighten the feeling of anxiety and lead to loss of consciousness.

Controlling your breathing and taking slow measured breaths can help you calm down. Concentrating on the pace and feeling the air move in and out of your body on inspiration and expiration.

For some people, it can worsen the panic attack. Shift to other techniques if deep breathing does not work for you.

Keep in mind, it will pass

Keep reminding yourself that the panic attack will pass. The thought will reassure you and help stop the panic attack.

Take medications

If you have been prescribed medications by a doctor to control panic attacks, keep them with you. These medications can help control your heart rate, breathing and reduce your blood pressure.

Take those medications if you feel the signs of the panic attack worsening.Some medications can prevent a panic attack from occurring.

But they can be highly addictive, follow the instructions carefully. Do not take these medications with alcohol or drugs containing opioids. They can have life threatening side effects.

Read more:
How to stop a panic attack

Source : Business Matters More   

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Disbelief as Scotland loses out in £1bn carbon capture project

Scotland has been dealt an “economic and environmental” blow after a flagship carbon capture project was sidelined by the UK government, a billionaire businessman has said. Read more: Disbelief as Scotland loses out in £1bn carbon capture project

Disbelief as Scotland loses out in £1bn carbon capture project

Scotland has been dealt an “economic and environmental” blow after a flagship carbon capture project was sidelined by the UK government, a billionaire businessman has said.

Sir Ian Wood, the tycoon and philanthropist, was among the figures expressing disbelief at the decision.

Greg Hands, the energy minister, declared that two English projects, in the northwest around Liverpool and across Humber and Teesside, are to be granted Track 1 status, with access to state support such as the £1 billion carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) infrastructure fund set up in 2018.

The potential for a faster development timetable may see the projects operating by the middle of this decade which would bring substantial investment and thousands of jobs to the areas.

The Scottish cluster, based around the St Fergus gas terminal in the northeast but also incorporating the Grangemouth complex, was announced as a reserve project for Track 1. The cluster, known as the Acorn project, would move up if either of the other two were to fail or be discontinued.

Sir Ian, who is involved in developing an Energy Transition Zone in Aberdeen, said: “This makes little economic or environmental sense and is a real blow to Scotland.

“There is also a huge opportunity for oil and gas firms, domestic supply chain companies and our wider economy to harness the skills and expertise of our current workforce to create many good, green jobs in the coming years and contribute significantly to the net-zero ambition. We have previously made clear that there is a strong case for five or six clusters to be backed now to encourage collaboration across the UK and to accelerate these efforts.

“At the very least I urge the UK government to reconsider their decision and add a third cluster to the Track 1 programme which should undoubtedly be the excellent Scottish bid.”

Carbon capture is seen as a key way to tackle emissions from heavy industry as well as reusing North Sea infrastructure and empty fields. It is expected to work by taking CO2 emissions and then either reusing them or storing them permanently underground.

Michael Matheson, Scotland’s energy secretary, said: “It is clear that the Acorn project is the most cost-effective and deliverable opportunity to deploy a full chain CCS project in the UK. It is therefore completely illogical that the UK government has taken the decision not to award the Scottish cluster clear and definitive Track 1 status.”

Oil and Gas UK, the industry body, also suggested that more than two carbon capture sites would be needed if the country were to become carbon neutral by 2050.

Hands said: “A reserve cluster is one which met the eligibility criteria and performed to a good standard against the evaluation criteria. As such, we will continue to engage with the Scottish cluster throughout phase 2 of the sequencing process, to ensure it can continue its development and planning.”

Read more:
Disbelief as Scotland loses out in £1bn carbon capture project

Source : Business Matters More   

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